Sighting in a new Savage 30-06

Sighting in a new Savage 30-06

This is a discussion on Sighting in a new Savage 30-06 within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Ok, so I bought a Savage 111 30-06 and I put a Bushnell 3x9 scope on it. I set up a paper target 16"x24" maybe? ...

Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Sighting in a new Savage 30-06

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array PapaScout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    569

    Sighting in a new Savage 30-06

    Ok, so I bought a Savage 111 30-06 and I put a Bushnell 3x9 scope on it.

    I set up a paper target 16"x24" maybe? Whatever those measure with the five bright red targets on them. Anyway, plenty big enough to test this new toy out, right?

    I backup to just past my 50 yard mark in my range, lean against a fallen tree and rest my elbows on it in a nice comfortable stable position.

    <BANG> - not even on the paper
    <BANG, BANG, BANG, BANG> - shooting at top, bottom, left, right of target trying to get something on paper.

    I went through a box of 20 (my shoulder was a bit sore) and only got one on paper when I aimed about three feet down to the right at about a 45 degree angle from center of paper.

    Now I'm not sure how much adjustment the scope will do. Can it really be this far off? Are the mounts that the local gunshop sold me not the right ones for this rifle?

    Anyone else ever had this? I guess I assumed that a first mount would at least have me on that large of a target from so close in.

    Help!
    "If you so much as bunny hop I'll cut your heart out!" Billy Bob Thornton in The Last Real Cowboys

    "I carry a gun for the same reason that I carry health insurance and a cell phone - be prepared."


  2. #2
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,497
    Yes to all. The mounts could be wrong for the gun, not installed properly etc. The scope can be off (not as likely since it was really far off but possible) was the scope setting on the 0 mark?

    Did you boresight it? This could help you get on paper faster and can be done in your living room with almost no tools. Secure the gun remove the bolt, look through the barrel and adjust crosshairs on scope to match view through barrel. An even better way is to buy a cheap boresighter that slips into the bore, they don't cost much.

    I am sure there are other people on the forum that has better advice than this, so wait until you hear from them.

  3. #3
    JT
    JT is offline
    Distinguished Member Array JT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,425
    Agreed. Getting an inexpensive boresighter is a big time saver. I have this one…

    http://www.riflescopes.com/products/...oresighter.htm
    Blessed be the Lord my rock who trains my hands for war and my fingers for battle. Psalm 144:1

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  4. #4
    Senior Member Array craze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    515
    I would simply suggest moving in closer to say 25yards. This should get you on paper. Get close to zero there then fine tune as you move out. Most scopes 1 click equals 1/4 inch at 100yds. At 25 it will be 4 clicks per 1/4''. To try to guess when you're not even on paper is an exersise of extreme frustration.
    "Some people go to bed with Lucifer..........then cry, cry, cry when they don't greet the day with God."

  5. #5
    Lead Moderator
    Array rocky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    16,033
    Even boresighting thru the barrel will get you on paper.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


    Nemo Me Impune Lacesset

  6. #6
    Member Array Harold Green's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    132

    Here's the sighting in process

    You need to do some specific things in order to sight your rifle in, and all of these can be done at the range. You don't need much in the way of equipment, but a good, solid rest is critical.

    You may want to go to a range that has solid shooting benches and sandbags. If you would like your own sandbags, you can fill ten-inch sections of old pant legs with kitty litter and sew up the ends.

    To start, set up a target at 25 yards, remove the bolt from your rifle, and prop the rifle on the sandbags so it's pointing at the target. You will need it to sit on the sandbags and be steady without you holding it. Look through the barrel and adjust the rifle's position until you can look through the barrel and see the bullseye centered in the bore. Without moving the rifle, look through the scope and turn the adjusting knobs until the cross hairs are centered on the same point your are looking at through the bore.

    Put the bolt back in the rifle and fire three rounds at the target before you adjust the scope. Adjust the scope to move the center of your group to the center of the 25-yard target. As the target's only 1/4th the distance most scope adjustments are calibrated for (usually 100 yards) you'll need to move the knobs four time as many clicks as would be needed at the range the adjustments are calibrated for. That means if you scope knob needs to be moved four clicks to move the group one inch at 100 yards, you will need to move the knob sixteen clicks to move it an inch at 25 yards.

    Repeat this process until your group is centered on the 25-yard target, then post a 100-yard target and fire three rounds at it. Your group should be somewhere on the paper. Use the adjustment knobs to bring your group to the center of the 100-yard target.

    The trajectory the bullets from most high-powered rifles take will cross the line of sight (where your cross hairs are looking) twice during it's travel. The bullet will cross the line of sight going up at about 25 yards, it will peak (at mid-range trajectory) at about 50 yards, and cross the line of sight again at about 100 yards. That's why you need to sight your rifle in first at 25 yards in order to get it on paper at 100 yards. Then you can finish sighting it in at 100 yards.

    All shots should be fired from a solid, sandbag rest in order to minimize human error.

    After you've sighted it in at 100 yards, you can then sight it in for longer ranges if you need to.

    It's not uncommon for a newly scoped rifle to hit nowhere near the paper at 100 yards until you go through this kind of procedure.

    If you still can't bring your rifle to point of aim, you may need to shim your scope. This is very uncommon with modern rifles and mounts, but does happen once in a great while. You may want to get a gunsmith's help with this.

    Also, as others have mentioned, you can speed up this process by bore sighting your rifle using either an optical or laser boresighter.
    "A gentleman will seldom, if ever, need a pistol. However, if he does, he needs it very badly!" -- Sir Winston Churchill

    "He who goes unarmed in paradise had better be sure that is where he is." -- James Thurber

  7. #7
    Senior Member Array PapaScout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    569
    Thanks to all. I bought a bore sighter tonight and will try it soon.
    "If you so much as bunny hop I'll cut your heart out!" Billy Bob Thornton in The Last Real Cowboys

    "I carry a gun for the same reason that I carry health insurance and a cell phone - be prepared."

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array Matthew Temkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    nyc
    Posts
    731
    After it is bore sighted shoot some groups dead center at 25 yards, which will put you about 3 inches high at 100.
    Since for my type of hunting this is a bit high I go back to 100 yards and have the groups at about 1-1/12 inches high.
    Many of my shots are at a very small target--such as the neck at about 80 yards, so I prefer to have pinpoint accuracy as opposed to a long range point blank zero.
    PS..try the 150 grain bullets if deer is to be your primary target.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array PapaScout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    569
    I'm on paper! :) Granted it's only at 25 yards but still paper is paper.

    The Leipold bore sighter (the back-lighted magnetic one that sticks to the muzzle) got me closer but I still had to crank on the scope to get hits.

    Went through another box of 20 (Remington CoreLok 165gr) and no sore shoulder this time. I'll go buy some more and then back out to 100 and see where I am.

    $30 worth of ammo and a $70 bore sighter and I'm excited about bagging a paper target at 25 yards. Geesh! Boys and their toys.
    "If you so much as bunny hop I'll cut your heart out!" Billy Bob Thornton in The Last Real Cowboys

    "I carry a gun for the same reason that I carry health insurance and a cell phone - be prepared."

  10. #10
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,497
    That paper won't laugh at you again

    Shooting stuff is so much fun

  11. #11
    Distinguished Member Array RSSZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,843
    Just read these posts. Gotta say, somethings wrong.

    Can't be the weapon. Have never seen one that bad. Scope ??? We'll with due respect.........you pay $79 for a scope.........your gettin' $79 worth of scope. But......I've owned Busnell's and they have been good "for the money" scopes.

    I usually can boresight a bolt gun to within 2-3" @ 50yds. just by taking out the bolt and looking down the bbl. This,with weapon layed in the groves cut out of a cardboard liquor box.

    I'd say that you have a glitch in your mounting system.

    One of the things that I see people do wrong is torqueing the rings onto the bases only finger tight. You gotta torque the heck outta that big knurled knob with a large screwdriver. Also make sure that the ring screws are torqued evenly and tightly. There is lots of other stuff to check but this oughta do for now.

    Also you do not need to do all that walkin' back and forth out to the 100yd. line. Without knowing what your hunting,at what ranges,using what bullet,the "thumb rule" is >>>dead on at 50,dead on a 150.This will put you as close as you can hold rested accross a stump. Also .5" low at 50 will put you dead on at 200'ish. These figures aren't exact but will allow you to hold hair out to 300+ yds.

    If you need more precise ballistics let me know and I'll check my loading manuals.

    Good luck, and let us know how you make out. -------

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array PapaScout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    569
    No offense taken, RSSZ. I could have spent hundreds $$ on a scope and I went cheap. Cheap rifle, cheap scope, cheap PapaScout. :)

    I have tried moving the scope by hand and it seems to be fine. I did loktite everything when I put it together but I did not measure torque when I tightened. Maybe this is it?

    I've shot thousands of .22 rifle rounds and maybe a hundred in my Dad's 30-30 over the years but do not have much experience with this much rifle. I think the last box of 20 went better than the first box. ;-) Although I don't feel like I tensing for recoil or anything.

    Let me shoot a bit more and see what happens. Now that I'm starting to get some predictability as to where those holes show up I should be able to see if it's me or the setup.

    Ron
    "If you so much as bunny hop I'll cut your heart out!" Billy Bob Thornton in The Last Real Cowboys

    "I carry a gun for the same reason that I carry health insurance and a cell phone - be prepared."

  13. #13
    Distinguished Member Array RSSZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,843
    Nothing cheap 'bout a Savage. I have a 112V that will shoot in the low to mid .300"'s. I also had a Bushnell with BDC(remember the little drums that were interchangeable) on a 7mag that would take woodchucks at 400+yds all day long.

    You don't have to measure torque. The way that the rings go onto the bases(Weaver ?) and the way that the scope goes onto the rings will hold everything pretty tight if you tightened as you would any metal to metal screw. Locktite(blue) is good also. Or clear fingernail polish. Did you use a screwdriver on the ring to base screws? If these loosen your groups will open up very quickly. -----

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Nothing better than cleaning your Savage while listening to Savage!
    By Cold Warrior in forum Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: July 7th, 2010, 08:26 PM
  2. Sighting in an old Python...
    By dagace in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: April 21st, 2009, 03:33 AM
  3. Sighting In My Rifle
    By McPatrickClan in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: November 19th, 2008, 03:06 PM
  4. Idiot sighting
    By Sheldon J in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: September 6th, 2008, 10:28 PM

Search tags for this page

how to sight in my 30-06
,

rifle scopes calibrated for 30-06

,
savage 30-06 sight in
,
sighting in 30-06
,
sighting in a 30-06 rifle
,
sighting in a 3x9 scope
,

sighting in a savage 30-06

,

sighting in my 30-06

,

sighting in my savage 30-06

,
sighting in savage .30-06
,
sighting in savage 111
,

sighting in savage 30-06

Click on a term to search for related topics.