M-1 Garand Problem with Reloads

M-1 Garand Problem with Reloads

This is a discussion on M-1 Garand Problem with Reloads within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I have a WWII, M-1 Garand and she shoots that ol' Greek surplus ammo just fine. I began reloading for the .30-06 caliber for this ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22
Like Tree19Likes

Thread: M-1 Garand Problem with Reloads

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array mano3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wetumpka, AL
    Posts
    1,072

    Question M-1 Garand Problem with Reloads

    I have a WWII, M-1 Garand and she shoots that ol' Greek surplus ammo just fine.

    I began reloading for the .30-06 caliber for this gun and started with 150 grain bullets, as per my Lyman manual.

    When firing my reloads, occasionally a round won't fire (you hear that dreaded loud click) and the bolt and cover gets stuck. It takes an amount of force (rubber hammer) to open the bolt and eject the bad round.

    When examining the round, there's just the slightest dimple on the primer and the round will not fire again, even in different M-1's. In fact, it jams their bolts as well!

    This happens with about 1% of these reloads...

    I understand the occurrence of possible bad primers, but why is the bolt jamming? It's causing a bad situation, as you're out of the fight until you break-out a rubber hammer...
    US Air Force, 1986 - 2007

    "To disarm the people is the best and most effective way to enslave them..." George Mason

    http://www.appleseedinfo.org/

  2. #2
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Condition Yellow
    Posts
    10,349
    Check your bullet depth first, and then measure your brass to see if it needs trimming.
    " Blessed is that man, who when facing death, thinks only of his front sight"
    -Jeff Cooper

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array mano3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wetumpka, AL
    Posts
    1,072
    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    Check your bullet depth first, and then measure your brass to see if it needs trimming.
    Bullet depth appears fine, as for the trimming as well, but I am using Lee equipment and it doesn't seem to be the most precise in those departments...
    US Air Force, 1986 - 2007

    "To disarm the people is the best and most effective way to enslave them..." George Mason

    http://www.appleseedinfo.org/

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array PAcanis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    7,313
    You're resizing and trimming your brass, right?
    I trim to 2.488 and load 150gr Sierra bullets to 3.30".
    mano3 likes this.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Array mano3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wetumpka, AL
    Posts
    1,072
    Quote Originally Posted by PAcanis View Post
    You're resizing and trimming your brass, right?
    I trim to 2.488 and load 150gr Sierra bullets to 3.30".
    I am resizing and trimming. Is that the culprit I'm describing? If so, then I'm doing it wrong! Ugh...
    US Air Force, 1986 - 2007

    "To disarm the people is the best and most effective way to enslave them..." George Mason

    http://www.appleseedinfo.org/

  6. #6
    Distinguished Member Array hdhnict's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Wichita, KS
    Posts
    1,233
    The "slight dimple" remark makes me wonder. Are your primers seated "flush"?
    A primer seated too deep could fail to fire. But unless you have over-cleaned the primer pocket that shouldn't happen.

    Do you full length resize? If you pushed the shoulder back the whole round could go too deep into the chamber.
    COL and case length could be fine, but the shoulder determines where the round chambers.

    The next thing to check would be the firing pin. Yours might be on the ragged edge of being too short.
    Or something (dirt/debris) stopping it occasionally.
    MMinSC likes this.
    I don't carry to deter crime. I carry to defend myself!

  7. #7
    Senior Moderator
    Array gasmitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    12,835
    Just reinforcing suggestions already made:

    Full-length resize! Some rifle dies are neck-sizing only.

    Check your case length - you need a decent pair of dial calipers (not the plastic ones and not the $12 Harbor Fright ones - look in Grainger or McMaster-Carr catalogs and spend at least what you would on a set of dies).

    Based on your symptoms, my guess is that your unfired cartridges are either too long and the neck is getting stuck in the chamber (not real likely on a vintage battle rifle that isn't sporting a new barrel), or the body of the cartridge isn't fully resized after it was last fired (more probable) and it's sticking in the chamber.
    Smitty
    NRA Endowment Member
    NROI Chief Range Officer

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array mano3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wetumpka, AL
    Posts
    1,072
    All signs point to improper re-sizing and trimming... I can fix that!

    Why does it jam the bolt and why won't the rounds fire anymore?
    US Air Force, 1986 - 2007

    "To disarm the people is the best and most effective way to enslave them..." George Mason

    http://www.appleseedinfo.org/

  9. #9
    VIP Member Array PAcanis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    7,313
    Quote Originally Posted by mano3 View Post
    I am resizing and trimming. Is that the culprit I'm describing? If so, then I'm doing it wrong! Ugh...
    Well, if you're full length resizing, then it shouldn't be any more sticky that the HXP.
    You're cleaning your lube off, right? (assuming you are full length resizing)

  10. #10
    Senior Member Array mano3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wetumpka, AL
    Posts
    1,072
    Quote Originally Posted by PAcanis View Post
    Well, if you're full length resizing, then it shouldn't be any more sticky that the HXP.
    You're cleaning your lube off, right? (assuming you are full length resizing)
    Clean, dry and serviceable sir!
    US Air Force, 1986 - 2007

    "To disarm the people is the best and most effective way to enslave them..." George Mason

    http://www.appleseedinfo.org/

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Exact center of CA
    Posts
    2,732
    Quote Originally Posted by mano3 View Post
    All signs point to improper re-sizing and trimming... I can fix that!

    Why does it jam the bolt and why won't the rounds fire anymore?
    Just a guess, Some dimension of the loaded round is just large enough to not allow the bolt to fully close . Its close enough to allow the firing pin to fall but not enough to make a proper strike. The reason it is hard to eject is the bolt and then the firing pin have both tried to wedge it into the chamber. [ Some of the firing pin hit is used up driving it forward ]. The tell tale sign is it also sticks in other guns chambers. If you examine the case closely you will find the scuff marks where its out of spec. look close at the case mouth, the shoulder, and just forward of the extractor groove. This may be as simple as you not completely closing the sizing die on every piece of brass. Its easy to have short stroked one. Or had a bit of debris stopping it short. It would not have been much or it would not have chambered at all. Good Luck DR
    mano3 likes this.

  12. #12
    Senior Moderator
    Array gasmitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    12,835
    Don't forget that a modern bolt-action rifle is a lot more tolerant of oversize cases with respect to ejection due to the camming action of the bolt. Autoloaders lack that capability and are thus more sensitive to oversized cases.
    glockman10mm, mano3 and PAcanis like this.
    Smitty
    NRA Endowment Member
    NROI Chief Range Officer

  13. #13
    Senior Member Array mano3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wetumpka, AL
    Posts
    1,072
    Taking all this in, I think I know what happened - I used a 'new fangled' re-sizing die from Lee on some of my rounds that didn't require lubricating the brass.

    Further research showed me that the die doesn't give the round 100% justice in the re-sizing department and I went back to the regular 'old fashioned' die with lube. Those rounds are not giving me trouble.

    The old ways are sometimes the best ways...

    Thanks for all your input here folks!!!!
    US Air Force, 1986 - 2007

    "To disarm the people is the best and most effective way to enslave them..." George Mason

    http://www.appleseedinfo.org/

  14. #14
    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Exact center of CA
    Posts
    2,732
    What happens if you lubed the lubless die? DR

  15. #15
    VIP Member
    Array nedrgr21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,424
    Glad you got it worked out. I always found a quick shot of OneShot case lube still helpfull on carbide dies.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •