Rifle Scopes/Range finders

This is a discussion on Rifle Scopes/Range finders within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Are there scopes that also are capable of acting as a range finder Also? as l am intending this coming year to mount this on ...

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Thread: Rifle Scopes/Range finders

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    Member Array Draco's Avatar
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    Rifle Scopes/Range finders

    Are there scopes that also are capable of acting as a range finder Also? as l am intending this coming year to mount this on a Remington 700 S.P.S. in .308 my first honest tack driver but must confess my ignorance of optics.
    As this type of rifle/scope combo had until recently left me alone. Every time l tell my wife that's it, this sort of thing happens also how do the series of numbers depicting capabilities
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    Quote Originally Posted by Draco View Post
    also how do the series of numbers depicting capabilities
    Yes, there are range-finding optics, but they are generally VERY expensive. Learn to use a mil-dot type reticle, and you can make some very good range estimations without the extra electronics. Alternatively, buy a separate laser range-finder if you want a quick and easy way to lase distances, and stick with a "standard" optic on the rifle.

    I can't answer the last part of your question (quoted above) because I don't know what you're asking...
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Draco View Post
    Are there scopes that also are capable of acting as a range finder....... also how do the series of numbers depicting capabilities
    Quote Originally Posted by OPFOR View Post
    Yes, there are range-finding optics, but they are generally VERY expensive. Learn to use a mil-dot type reticle, and you can make some very good range estimations without the extra electronics.
    Gotta agree with OPFOR- get a mil-dot scope!

    As to your second part 'series of numbers'.....If you are referring to the numbers like 3-9x40 or 10x42....Those are the scopes magnification & objective lens size. Take the first one 3-9x40, that means that the scope has an ADJUSTABLE or zoom magnification from 3 times to 9 times. The 40 means that the front lens is 40mm in diameter (larger the lens, the more light it gathers). The second set 10x42, means the scope has a FIXED power of 10 times & a 42mm objective lens.
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    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
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    Mil Dot Scope question: If you cover a basketball with the dot at 9x, you then know that the basketball is X distance away becuase you know that basketballs are a standard size. If you pull back to 5x, the dot still won't cover the ball, will it? So is it SOP to memorize all the different distances at varios settings, or always estimate ranges at the same magnification setting? [endof hijack]
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    VIP Member Array Rob72's Avatar
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    Shepherd Scopes are very nice, and (IMO) are more user-friendly than traditional mil-dot. IOR offers osme scopes with similar reticles.

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    Here is a good place to get yourself familiar withe the Mil-Dot system:

    http://www.shooterready.com/mildot.html
    Quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit, occidentis telum est.-Seneca

    "If you carry a gun, people will call you paranoid. If I have a gun, what do I have to be paranoid about?" -Clint Smith

    "An unarmed man can only flee from evil, and evil is not overcome by fleeing from it." -Jeff Cooper

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    Most mil-dots on variable power scopes take into account the level of magnification... BTW, check out the site that goawayfarm linked to, it's very informative...

    And yes, there are other "range finding reticles" out there, all based on (more or less) the same principles. Find one you like, study the heck out of it, practice with it a LOT, and you'll find them to be very accurate (minute of bad guy, anyway) without the extra cost/weight/electronics of a LRF.
    Last edited by OPFOR; December 3rd, 2007 at 12:24 PM.
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

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    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
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    Great link, Thanks.
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    VIP Member Array Supertac45's Avatar
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    Thanks for the link. I'd spend a lot of time looking at resources and info on rangefinders and scopes before buying.
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  11. #10
    Member Array Randy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cupcake
    Mil Dot Scope question: If you cover a basketball with the dot at 9x, you then know that the basketball is X distance away becuase you know that basketballs are a standard size. If you pull back to 5x, the dot still won't cover the ball, will it? So is it SOP to memorize all the different distances at varios settings, or always estimate ranges at the same magnification setting? [endof hijack]
    Quote Originally Posted by OPFOR
    Most mil-dots on variable power scopes take into account the level of magnification...
    Variable power scopes are of two basic types. Front focal plane and rear focal plane.

    Scopes with a rear focal plane must be set to a specific magnification level (usually the highest power setting available) when using the mil-dot, or other internal system, for range estimation. With this type of scope, the reticle maintains its size while the object you are viewing gets larger and smaller as you adjust the power level of the scope.

    Scopes with a front focal plane can be used at any magnification level for range estimation. The reticle stays proportionally the same size as the object you are viewing, that is, the reticle gets larger as you increase magnification and smaller as you decrease magnification.

    The advantage of the front focal plane scope is that you can use it at any power setting for range estimation. Of course, that is also its weakness - the reticle grows in size with the object you are viewing, thus consuming a larger percentage of your field of view.

    Approximately 95% of the scopes on the market are of the rear focal plane design.

    edited to add:
    I meant to answer the basketball question earlier and didn't...
    A basketball is approximately 9.5" in diameter, a standard octagonal stop sign is 30" across the flat edges, a standard vehicle license plate is 12" x 6", a street-mounted collection type mailbox is roughly 20" x 20" and 50" tall, etc...

    Randy
    Last edited by Randy; December 6th, 2007 at 03:40 PM.

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