Why Zero at 25 meters?

Why Zero at 25 meters?

This is a discussion on Why Zero at 25 meters? within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I am wondering does anyone know why the military zeros at 25 meters? Is this supposed to catch the bullet on the rise to a ...

Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Why Zero at 25 meters?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array Paladin132's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    528

    Why Zero at 25 meters?

    I am wondering does anyone know why the military zeros at 25 meters? Is this supposed to catch the bullet on the rise to a certain point and then on the drop at 300 meters? At what point does one have to hold high / low to hit center mass? Amazing as it is, no one ever explained it to me.

    On the same point, what does everyone zero their battlesight to on their AR? Iron sights and red dot optics, or 3 or 4 power but not the more rifle scope things most people think of, but battle optics?


  2. #2
    Senior Member Array Roadrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    NW PA
    Posts
    737
    They zero at 25 meters because it's a lot easier to walk 25 meters to check the target than it is to walk 100 or 200 meters. Zero is performed with the elevation knob at the "8/3 +1 click" position; for the actual 300 meter range, the knob is moved back to the 8/3 setting to compensate for the increased range. If you forget to move the knob back, it's very hard to hit your targets on the 300 meter range.
    - Kurt
    “Freedom is the sure possession of those alone who have the courage to defend it.” ~Pericles of Athens
    Primary Carry - Colt Commander .45 in a Brommeland Max-Con V

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array aus71383's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    2,543
    Marines zero at 36 yards which puts them dead on at 300. I think the Army does the 25 meter thing....not sure what exactly is going on there. If you zero at 50 yards you should be dead on at 250....also a good way to do it. One click on the elevation knob is 1" elevation (on an A2....on the A4's its 1/2") for every hundred meters - so 8/3+1 at 300 meters is 3 inches different than 8/3 at the same range.

    Basically the sights are about 2.5 inches above the bore, so at 7 yards to hit the target you need to "aim" 2.5 inches low - in reality the bore is pointed straight at the target. At 36/50 you'll be dead on (depending where you zeroed) and past that you'll be within a couple inches of point of aim out to 300/250.

    Austin

  4. #4
    BAC
    BAC is offline
    VIP Member Array BAC's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    2,292
    The 300 yard zero is (finally) starting to fall out of use (ala new Army training proposals; not sure when they're supposed to be implimented, but soon). The 200 yard zero is likely a lot more relevant in modern combat, because most engagements are occuring anywhere within that 200 yard range, and a 200 yard zero provides a flatter trajectory and better chance of hits within the 200 yards than the 300 yard zero (which accounts for more of an arched trajectory).


    -B

  5. #5
    VIP Member
    Array OPFOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nomad
    Posts
    4,713
    The answer is in the OP - it is because you will be on at 25 AND 300 (25 as the bullet is rising and 300 as it is decending, with the path of the bullet never being outside of a normal human torso during its flight).
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  6. #6
    VIP Member Array Sig 210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Southwestern OK
    Posts
    2,017
    US Army used to call it the 1,000 inch range. When Kuwait got invaded i was the senior Saudi firing range advisor. Saudis used the FAL and the G-3 and zeroed at 30 meters. US Army units had no end of heartburn over the five meter difference.

  7. #7
    Moderator
    Array buckeye .45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    7,728
    Our RCOs (Rifle Combat Optics) are set at 4X, and we zero them in at 36 yards. They have a built in bullet drop compensator within the reticle, once you get it set, you are good to in in theory out for several hundred yards.

    As far as why 36 yards, OPFOR hit it.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

  8. #8
    Member Array Longbow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Montana, USA
    Posts
    396
    I know that with the 762x39 AK, SKS you battle zero at 25m, this will keep you on a torso size target 19" circle from point blank to 300m. When with these rifles you have your battle zero set, you can then use your 100m 200m site settings and so on and you will be on.
    "Planning to draw and chamber a round after TSHTF is like planning to fasten your seatbelt after you see the other guy run a stopsign..."

    Professional hand engraver.
    To see full picture of knife in Avatar click here

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array Paladin132's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    528
    OK, let me refine the question then please into a realm that i know nothing about. I assumed the bit about 25 to 300... What about optocs, such as the red dot aimpoint or the x3 and x4 acog?

  10. #10
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Fayetteville, AR
    Posts
    13,687
    Alot of info, too much to list or link. Terms to remember, Line-of-sight, and Point of impact.
    zeroing the ar-15 for battle - Crawler.com

  11. #11
    Moderator
    Array buckeye .45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    7,728
    What exactly do you want to know about an ACOG? I'm no expert, but there is one sitting on my issued A4, and its pretty handy to have there.

    They come zeroed at 100 meters and the drop compensator is built into the reticle. Last time we zero'd ours I believe it was at 100 meters as well.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array Paladin132's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    528
    Buckeye - that's basically what I wanted to know. Although I am sure the Army does it their way I have always been impressed with the USMC and their rifle training.

  13. #13
    Moderator
    Array buckeye .45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    7,728
    Yeah, I guess we do a decent job at it. First time I shot at 500 meters, ever, I got black, that was a satisfying feeling with iron sights.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

  14. #14
    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    2,046
    Quote Originally Posted by Paladin132 View Post
    OK, let me refine the question then please into a realm that i know nothing about. I assumed the bit about 25 to 300... What about optocs, such as the red dot aimpoint or the x3 and x4 acog?
    The type of sighting system is generally irrelevant. Be it iron sights, 0 magnification red dot or fixed/variable power scope, the rationale is the same. A bullet, prior to reaching the apex of it's trajectory, crosses the line of sight twice. Once as it rises to meet the line of sight of the sighting system and once again as it drops to hit the target distance. The single biggest reason (at least as I've always believed) to sight in at a shorter yardage is that it is easier to "get on the paper" at 25 yards than 100 yards. Without the use of some type of bore-sighting system, it is entirely possible to be completely off the target at 100 yards. Unless you are shooting with a backstop immediately behind your target, it may be impossible to detect where your bullet is going thus wasting many rounds of ammo just to get on the target. By moving the target in to 25 (or whatever shorter distance), your odds of being on the paper with a newly mounted scope are greatly enhanced. Now, with a laser bore-sighter, I rarely use the 25 yard system anymore. I bore-sight and go directly to 100 yards for refinement. The reason I prefer to sight at 100 (instead of 200, 300, etc.) is that unless you have access to an indoor tunnel range, distances in excess of 100 yards bring wind more into the equation and it's almost impossible to find a windless day in Kansas. By sighing at 100 yards, I can reduce the effect of the wind to a point that allows me to get a better perfect zero and then make actual shot placement adjustments at the time of the critical shot. Hope this makes some sense to you. It seems to make sense as I'm typing it, but I'm not sure I'm conveying my intent as effectively as it could be.

    Hoss
    Sig 239 SAS 40 S&W / Sig 239 9mm / Kahr PM-9 / Walther PPS .40 / Sig P-245 / Ruger LCP
    Beretta Tomcat / Walther PPK / BDA 380 / Taurus 85 / Kel-Tec PF-9 / Am. Derringer 357

    NRA Life Member
    My Web Site

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array sgtD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    2,292
    Here is an informative and quite well done article on the subject that covers several popular calibers.

    zero
    When you've got 'em by the balls, their hearts & minds will follow. Semper Fi.

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Lahner Tactical Training - Extreme CQC (0-5 meters)
    By heylin in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: August 19th, 2011, 04:11 PM
  2. Gas Meters and Dogs- I Got the Pic
    By randytulsa2 in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: December 28th, 2007, 04:00 PM
  3. Rottenweilers and Gas Meters, Circa 1996: Why I love Meter Men
    By randytulsa2 in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: January 24th, 2007, 11:53 AM

Search tags for this page

25 meter sight in
,

25 meter zero

,
25 meter zero target printable
,
25 meter zeroing
,
acog 25 meter zero
,
acog 25meter zero
,

how far is 25 meters

,
how to zero acog with 25 meter target
,
how to zero an acog at a 25 meter target
,
why zero at 25 meters
,
zero acog 25 meter target
,
zero at 25 meters
Click on a term to search for related topics.