Scope adjustment - Page 2

Scope adjustment

This is a discussion on Scope adjustment within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Thanks to all. One more question. Moving towards "L", will move the scope left or the shot left?...

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Thread: Scope adjustment

  1. #16
    Senior Member Array rmilchman's Avatar
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    Thanks to all. One more question. Moving towards "L", will move the scope left or the shot left?

  2. #17
    VIP Member Array nedrgr21's Avatar
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    Adjust scopes and rear sights in the direction you want to move the bullet impact. Since you're shooting high/right, turn the windage adjustment in the "L" (left) direction - if you were shooting open sights, you'd drift the rear sight to the left.

    Here's a good read for you about 22lr ballistics.

  3. #18
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
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    What caliber is your Savage 22? I don't seem to find anything in 22lr for a model 22. Does your rifle shoot 22lr or something else? Not sure if you were referring to the model, or the caliber. I'd need to know this before I post an extensive reply about 22lr.

  4. #19
    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    You've already received advice on how to zero your scope but I do want to get one thing out for you and future new rifle shooters.
    NO boresighter, be it optical or laser, will zero a rifle/scope combination.

    ALL
    it will do is get you on paper. Final zeroing can only be accomplished by shooting the gun. No shortcuts. I don't know why gunshops don't explain this to people when they boresight a new scope for the customer.

    Hoss
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  5. #20
    Senior Member Array rmilchman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ram Rod View Post
    What caliber is your Savage 22? I don't seem to find anything in 22lr for a model 22. Does your rifle shoot 22lr or something else? Not sure if you were referring to the model, or the caliber. I'd need to know this before I post an extensive reply about 22lr.
    It's a model 64, the caliber is 22lr.

  6. #21
    Member Array Snakedriver's Avatar
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    This may sound silly to those who are familiar with scopes, but the turret adjustment screws for windage and elevation are beneath the two screw-on caps on most rifles. They must be removed first in order to make adjustments on the scope. Believe it or not, I had a friend that was trying to make scope adjustments by just screwing and unscrewing the turret caps and couldn't figure out why his impact point wasn't moving. Only some of the expensive sniper type scopes are sans the turret cap covers.
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  7. #22
    Senior Member Array rmilchman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvhoss View Post
    You've already received advice on how to zero your scope but I do want to get one thing out for you and future new rifle shooters.
    NO boresighter, be it optical or laser, will zero a rifle/scope combination.

    ALL
    it will do is get you on paper. Final zeroing can only be accomplished by shooting the gun. No shortcuts. I don't know why gunshops don't explain this to people when they boresight a new scope for the customer.

    Hoss

    Thanks, I was told after the sighting it would be accurate. Live and learn.

  8. #23
    VIP Member Array Yoda's Avatar
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    Double check the scope mount and make sure all of the screws are tight.

    So if your group was 1 inch high and 1 inch to the right you need to turn the top turret 16 clicks to the left and the side turret 16 clicks down.

    Make sure you are using a good solid rest (bean bag, etc) so your flinching will not affect the point of impact.

    Sighting-in is an important part of target shooting. In competitive pellet gun riflery, your first 2 shots are not scored so that you can adjust your sights.
    Yoda, I am, yes.

  9. #24
    Distinguished Member Array C9H13NO3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvhoss View Post
    You've already received advice on how to zero your scope but I do want to get one thing out for you and future new rifle shooters.
    NO boresighter, be it optical or laser, will zero a rifle/scope combination.

    ALL
    it will do is get you on paper. Final zeroing can only be accomplished by shooting the gun. No shortcuts. I don't know why gunshops don't explain this to people when they boresight a new scope for the customer.

    Hoss


    I really really really wish I could convince some of my buddies of that. He asked why I said paying for a bore sight wasn't really worth the money. I told him it just gets you on paper, and you have to do the actual adjustment with shots.

    This is a fellow Marine, and his response was "We boresighted our M4's to our ACOGS on the boat...even the recon snipers boresighted. That's all you need...you don't need to fire anything".

    We argued for about 10 minutes and I gave up and let him believe what he wants. I guess because he saw a sniper do it, it must be right, and there couldn't be any way in hell he would do a good zero before taking a shot that mattered....I hate ignorant people!
    -Ryan

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  10. #25
    Senior Member Array rmilchman's Avatar
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    Is it also safe to assume that depending on the ammo the sight may have to be re-adjusted?

  11. #26
    Distinguished Member Array C9H13NO3's Avatar
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    Yes, and moreso if you change the weight of the bullet.
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  12. #27
    Lead Moderator Array HotGuns's Avatar
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    even the recon snipers boresighted
    IF they had a colimated boresighter, they may have "referenced" it. Meaning that their boresighter has alignment marks on it that they reference to the scope AFTER the scope has been sighted in...with actuall shooting. What it does is ensure that the zero hasnt changed and that nothing has moved. Which is a good thing to do for a gun that is bouncing around in a case, hummer,aircraft,boat or whatever. You do a quick reference and are good to go.

    No "sniper" worth his salt would bore site a rifle and call it good. Anyone that thinks that is mistaken.

    Is it also safe to assume that depending on the ammo the sight may have to be re-adjusted?
    Even that same ammo in different lots can and will show a different point of impact. Any time the ammo is changed at all, the rifle needs to be verified by actually shooting at the zero distance.
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  13. #28
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmilchman View Post
    Is it also safe to assume that depending on the ammo the sight may have to be re-adjusted?
    For your original post, and this question. I won't rehash what others have said already about bore sighting and all. Pretty much, it's going to be what you want to get out of your .22 rifle. Your Savage model 64, magazine fed, semi automatic won't touch the accuracy of a bolt action, but with your own ballistics research, you should be able to impress yourself. Find the ammo that gives the best results for accuracy, and stick with it. Zero it at 25yds, and your zero should still be good for POI at 50yds generally. Nothing goes through my heavy silhouette 10/22 other than 36 or 40gr round nose lead solids with an aftermarket barrel. In my opinion, any rifle in 22lr should start out with lead solids of one brand/manufacturer, all the same design/weight, and shoot a few hundred rounds through before the first cleaning. Zero your scope/rifle during this period, and follow any changes on impact with adjustments to your scope. The lead/wax buildup in the bore will eventually break in your rifle to the most consistency you can expect from it. Make notes of your scope settings at 25, 50, 75, and 100yds. Especially how many clicks you need to go up at each range for the particular brand of ammo. Then clean your rifle, but the bore moderately. Don't ever expect a perfectly clean patch to come out in the end, or you'll be cleaning your rifle more than shooting it, and more than you'll need to IMO. Besides, I feel the base wax/lead coating should remain for the most part. Once you've done these things, you could move to any different ammo, even copper plated HP's if you want. But make note of your scope settings and changes with any change in ammo. I keep data for all the loads I've used on 3"x5" recipe cards....the load and the scope changes again at 25, 50, 75, and 100yds. One of my favorite loads is the Remington 22T Target. It's a 40gr solid and consistent for me and my equipment. Even then, my scope elevation changes from 25-100yds can span 4 clicks on a 1/4" click scope. 29-33 clicks in elevation total from a 25 yard zero to 100yds with that load for me. The 22LR is the 22LR. Know your limits, and the limits of the round. Get a decent scope for your rifle, and stick with that as well. Make a good choice, and you won't be swapping scopes and starting all over again.
    Quote Originally Posted by rmilchman View Post
    I have a Savage 22 with a Blazer 4X32 scope on it. Today was the first time I fired it. At 15 yards I seemed to be dead on target. At 25 my grouping was tight, but the grouping was not in center of the target. When I bought the gun the store used a laser to adjust the scope. The focus was on the wall at about 10 yards.

    My question is, is it the gun, me or a combination. Should I have the scope adjusted at a further distance? The range I go to has a max of 25 yards, although I would like to be accurate at a greater distance.
    Again, the 22lr has it's limitations. Depending on what you want, you can get there.

  14. #29
    Senior Member Array rmilchman's Avatar
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    I'm just shooting for fun with my sons. I understand why in a pistol my glock may not be as accurate as a fixed barrel. Why in a rifle would a bolt action be more accurate then a semi?

  15. #30
    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmilchman View Post
    I'm just shooting for fun with my sons. I understand why in a pistol my glock may not be as accurate as a fixed barrel. Why in a rifle would a bolt action be more accurate then a semi?
    Because in some semi-auto rifles, especially 22s, the only thing holding the bolt closed is spring pressure. By the very nature of the action, the bolt must be able to move to eject and reload a new cartridge. With a bolt rifle, there is a camming action when closing the bolt that locks the bolt tight against the shell casing thus eliminating any movement of the casing at the time of firing. This creates a more consistent alignment of the bullet with the bore.

    Hoss
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