.308 Rifle That I Can Shoot All Day - Page 4

.308 Rifle That I Can Shoot All Day

This is a discussion on .308 Rifle That I Can Shoot All Day within the Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Originally Posted by McPatrickClan For fear of my man card getting pulled, I have to set the record straight. I am not saying that I ...

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Thread: .308 Rifle That I Can Shoot All Day

  1. #46
    VIP Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by McPatrickClan View Post
    For fear of my man card getting pulled, I have to set the record straight.

    I am not saying that I dislike the recoil of the rifle because I am a modern-day Richard Simmons. I am saying that either:

    a) I have no idea how to properly shoot a rifle (I did a little asking-around, etc. and found little in the way of "lessons" for this)

    b) I am shooting properly but am finding that my shots are getting sloppier after about two dozen rounds... wondering if there is something that can be done about this

    While I am on the thinner side of the scale, I am by no means uncomfortable with fielding recoil if that is the reality of shooting a .308 cartridge!
    Do you have a recoil pad on your savage? Or is it just a hard piece of plastic?

    No, you are not a wuss. I'm not recoil shy at all but after 15 or 20 rounds of .308 in a lightweight bolt gun even Hulk Hogan will start to get sloppy. You need to quit so you don't start building bad habbits! Come back and shoot again when you are fresh.
    It is surely true that you can lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink. Nor can you make them grateful for your efforts.


  2. #47
    Senior Member Array McPatrickClan's Avatar
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    There is a brown pad on the back of the stock. I do not know the make or model & it is a bit old. I think replacing the stock will help a lot.

  3. #48
    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McPatrickClan View Post
    For fear of my man card getting pulled, I have to set the record straight.

    I am not saying that I dislike the recoil of the rifle because I am a modern-day Richard Simmons. I am saying that either:

    a) I have no idea how to properly shoot a rifle (I did a little asking-around, etc. and found little in the way of "lessons" for this)

    b) I am shooting properly but am finding that my shots are getting sloppier after about two dozen rounds... wondering if there is something that can be done about this

    While I am on the thinner side of the scale, I am by no means uncomfortable with fielding recoil if that is the reality of shooting a .308 cartridge!
    You really need to ignore this "man-up" garbage. Recoil from a hard-hitting cartridge hurts, plain and simple. Sometimes it hurts just a little bit, sometimes a lot but even recoil that is tolerable at the beginning will become intolerable as your shoulder becomes bruised and you start pounding the bruise with more recoil.

    I have a Remington 700 in 300 Win Mag with a beautiful wood stock. When I first bought it, I mounted a scope and headed out to sight it in. On the first shot, the scope split my forehead open as I was unprepared for that amount of recoil. After 20 rounds, I was folding up a towel and placing it between the gun butt and my shoulder. After another 20 rounds, I couldn't take it anymore and was starting to flinch badly with every shot. Two days later, my entire shoulder was black, blue, green and yellow and hurt like heck. Since the stock on this rifle was so gorgeous, I decided to put a cheap synthetic stock on it so as to not damage the wood stock dragging it through the woods. That cheap stock so changed the recoil signature of the rifle that I can now easily shoot 100 rounds with no ill effects. It was much straighter with less drop at the comb than the factory stock.

    A properly designed replacement stock can greatly reduce felt recoil. It won't reduce actual recoil, but will change the way that recoil hits you. A good gas operated semi-automatic will reduce recoil over a comparable bolt rifle because the gas system siphons off some of the gas to operate the bolt and reduces felt recoil.

    Hoss
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  4. #49
    Senior Member Array McPatrickClan's Avatar
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    Good stuff- thanks CVHoss.

  5. #50
    VIP Member Array maclean3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvhoss View Post
    You really need to ignore this "man-up" garbage. Recoil from a hard-hitting cartridge hurts, plain and simple. Sometimes it hurts just a little bit, sometimes a lot but even recoil that is tolerable at the beginning will become intolerable as your shoulder becomes bruised and you start pounding the bruise with more recoil.

    I have a Remington 700 in 300 Win Mag with a beautiful wood stock. When I first bought it, I mounted a scope and headed out to sight it in. On the first shot, the scope split my forehead open as I was unprepared for that amount of recoil. After 20 rounds, I was folding up a towel and placing it between the gun butt and my shoulder. After another 20 rounds, I couldn't take it anymore and was starting to flinch badly with every shot. Two days later, my entire shoulder was black, blue, green and yellow and hurt like heck. Since the stock on this rifle was so gorgeous, I decided to put a cheap synthetic stock on it so as to not damage the wood stock dragging it through the woods. That cheap stock so changed the recoil signature of the rifle that I can now easily shoot 100 rounds with no ill effects. It was much straighter with less drop at the comb than the factory stock.

    A properly designed replacement stock can greatly reduce felt recoil. It won't reduce actual recoil, but will change the way that recoil hits you. A good gas operated semi-automatic will reduce recoil over a comparable bolt rifle because the gas system siphons off some of the gas to operate the bolt and reduces felt recoil.

    Hoss
    A guy I use to work with hunts whitetails with that exact same rifle. I shot it once ... once was enough! I'm seriously thinking about a .308 instead now that I've had multiple spine surgeries. Anybody know anything about the Remington 700 VTR? Model 700™ VTR™

    I had a 700 BDL in 30-06 but sold it to a buddy at work. I like the -06 round a lot but it seems .308 "should" be slightly easier on recoil.
    Jack

  6. #51
    Distinguished Member Array Gideon's Avatar
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    I shoot a pre 64 model 70 winchester .308 and quite frankly it hurts. 10 rounds and I'm sporting a serious bruise but then again that gun came with a metal butt plate.

    Modern recoil pads are a wonderful thing but having the perfect length stock is CRITICAL to shooting comfort. Get it a bit too long or even a too short and you can't get quite the right cheek weld or the butt isn't high and tight in the shoulder and then... ouch

    I agree that not liking recoil is an honest thing, not a wimpy thing! It's one of the reason I stick with 9mm and .45's and skipped the .40's; because of the snappy feeling of the .40

    shoot what feels good and you can handle and you'll shoot better and more often but I can't imagine who can afford to put a lot of .308's down range without reloading!

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by McPatrickClan View Post
    For fear of my man card getting pulled, I have to set the record straight.

    I am not saying that I dislike the recoil of the rifle because I am a modern-day Richard Simmons. I am saying that either:

    a) I have no idea how to properly shoot a rifle (I did a little asking-around, etc. and found little in the way of "lessons" for this)

    b) I am shooting properly but am finding that my shots are getting sloppier after about two dozen rounds... wondering if there is something that can be done about this

    While I am on the thinner side of the scale, I am by no means uncomfortable with fielding recoil if that is the reality of shooting a .308 cartridge!
    Please don't misunderstand- it's not "man-up garbage" its physiology. .308 Win is not comparable to .300 Win Mag in generated energy, sorry. The more upper body, particularly shoulder, muscle mass you have, the less traumatic it will be. Technology can help with a good bit of management, and proper form will deal with the rest, but there are physical limits to the amount of energy a given individual's body can deal with.

    Now, you are correct, changing your stock and/or recoil pad will help- immensley.

    These are favorites among new rifle shooters. Typically a 1/2" pad is more than adequate for most centerfire calibers, until you get to the Mags. I suspect the KW100 is what you'd need, but the Brownell's tech line can tell you.

    If you aren't sure about your form, you're welcome to my first edition series of Plaster's Ultimate Sniper. In-depth info, and form-building guidelines for any rifle shooter. He is a bit of a plagarist, but I haven't seen anything else that compiles all the info in one place as well. Send me an email, if you want. It's FOC.
    rcox1 AT ouhsc.edu

  8. #53
    Senior Member Array McPatrickClan's Avatar
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    Thanks Rob- e-mail sent.

  9. #54
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    Do you have to have a 308? I understand why you don't want 223 for white tail, but there are several steps between 223 and 308. If you want 30 cal look at 7.62x39. Lots of decent carbine length battle rifles in that round and it is relatively light recoil. How about the 6.8 spc in a AR platform? Not as hard hitting as the 308 but vary capable of taking white tail size game over 300yds. Recoil very similar to the 223, w/ ~30% more energy. (308 has 50% more energy then 63gr 223)
    "The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us." Patrick Henry 1775

    Vegetarian: Indian for inept hunter.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by atctimmy View Post
    Unless you're going to be engaging targets at 300 yds it's too much gun. You can shoot through concrete block with a .308. You could shoot through a BG and then through your wall and then halfway through a neighbors house. A .308 is a heavy hitter.

    A .308 is a great "end of the world as we know it" weapon. A shotgun is a great home defense weapon.

    I Agree Shotgun is best for HD!


    R/S Lego

  11. #56
    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghuqu2 View Post
    .........(308 has 50% more energy then 63gr 223)
    Not to nit-pic (well, not much) but:
    Remington Premier Match Ammunition 308 Winchester 168 Grain Sierra MatchKing Hollow Point
    Muzzle Velocity: 2680 fps
    Muzzle Energy: 2678 ft. lbs.


    Remington Premier Match Ammunition 223 Remington 62 Grain Jacketed Hollow Point
    Muzzle Velocity: 3025 fps
    Muzzle Energy: 1260 ft. lbs.
    That puts the 308 at about 112% more energy than a 223 at the muzzle. The difference becomes more dramatic as range increases as the lighter 223 will shed energy faster than the heavier 308. At 100 yds., the difference is 153% (2303 ft. lbs. for the 308 to 910 ft. lbs. for the 223).

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  12. #57
    Senior Member Array McPatrickClan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghuqu2 View Post
    Do you have to have a 308?
    Honestly, I am not set on a .308 but it seems that finding that "one" rifle that does it all is very difficult. Understandably though, because raining rounds on a pair of intruders in 2,000 square foot home is a different ball game than squeezing the trigger on a whitetail 150 yards away.

    I have pretty much given in to the fact that I will have to keep my .308 bolt-action rifle for big game hunting and then get another weapon for long gun home defense (probably shotgun).

    Just for good measure, I may get a .22 for some fun plinking!

  13. #58
    Member Array Ghuqu2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvhoss View Post
    Not to nit-pic (well, not much) but:
    ...

    Hoss
    Sorry you are correct, I meant to say 223 has ~50% less energy then 308.

    Still, I would seriously look at the 6.8 Rem spc as an 'all around' rifle. I think it will work from zombie to dinner plate.

    If you go w/ an AR platform you can get a 22lr conversion and practice on the cheap! (w/ a 2nd upper in 223 of course)
    "The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us." Patrick Henry 1775

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  14. #59
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    Cool

    Check this XCR out. Be sure to look at the 'New Products' page also.
    Display Products


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    Ruger Frontier, I love mine, used it for a 5 day rifle class with no problem of any kind
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