Browning A-5 Question

Browning A-5 Question

This is a discussion on Browning A-5 Question within the Firearm Cleaning & Maintenance forums, part of the General Firearm Discussion category; Now that I've worked on a customers A-5 Light 12 and my own Sweet 16, I'm convinced of several things regarding John Moses Browning. 1- ...

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Thread: Browning A-5 Question

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    Browning A-5 Question

    Now that I've worked on a customers A-5 Light 12 and my own Sweet 16, I'm convinced of several things regarding John Moses Browning.

    1- The man was a genius.
    2- The man had an extra hand.
    3- He had a streak of sadism.

    The Browning A-5 contains a trigger spring held in place by a retaining pin (Part Number 74). It's a very stiff spring and a monstrous pain in the butt to compress and slide the retaining pin into place. I used the "get more people" method.

    Anyone done this and has more experience? Pliers won't work as there is a lip on the channel the spring sits in.
    bmcgilvray, msgt/ret, OD* and 1 others like this.

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    I agree that Browning designs are grand and also not necessarily easy to strip and reassemble, at least for klutzes like me. Several different Browning designed firearms are in the menagerie here and I've had trouble with them, especially the long guns, even with "NRA Guide To Firearms Assembly" and assorted parts diagrams.

    John Pederson's Remington Model 14 might be worse.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    I agree that Browning designs are grand and also not necessarily easy to strip and reassemble, at least for klutzes like me. Several different Browning designed firearms are in the menagerie here and I've had trouble with them, especially the long guns, even with "NRA Guide To Firearms Assembly" and assorted parts diagrams.

    John Pederson's Remington Model 14 might be worse.
    Complete disassembly of the Winchester 1892 gives me grief!
    "The pistol, learn it well, carry it always ..." ~ Jeff Cooper

    "Terrorists: They hated you yesterday, they hate you today, and they will hate you tomorrow.
    End the cycle of hatred, don’t give them a tomorrow."



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    Yeah Dan. I suppose one could master it if he was about it all the time. I just don't get into the innards of 19th century Browning-designed Winchester lever-actions often enough to become adept.

    Rob's right about that Browning. I have a similar Remington Model 11. Same basic design. A detail strip of that shotgun is an exercise in frustration for me.

    Thing about it is, the Browning designs rarely require detail stripping if their kept clean and maintained. They are stubbornly strong and effective designs. It's when we gather in an old used example that's crudded up with decades of neglect that things get tough.

    Now the Colt Woodsman is another Browning design that even field stripping gives me fits, I'm embarrassed to say.

    Really, only the 1911 gun and to a lesser extent, the High-Power, am I anything approaching proficient.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Thing about it is, the Browning designs rarely require detail stripping if their kept clean and maintained. They are stubbornly strong and effective designs. It's when we gather in an old used example that's crudded up with decades of neglect that things get tough.
    Yep. In this case the trigger spring had corroded and broken at the retaining pin.

    Good to see y'all again, by the way.
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