muzzle load cleaning?

This is a discussion on muzzle load cleaning? within the Firearm Cleaning & Maintenance forums, part of the General Firearm Discussion category; I am very new to the gun world here. When i get home i am going to be getting a muzzle loader for hunting purposes. ...

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Thread: muzzle load cleaning?

  1. #1
    Member Array russ1986's Avatar
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    muzzle load cleaning?

    I am very new to the gun world here. When i get home i am going to be getting a muzzle loader for hunting purposes. I was looking around on some websites like basspro cva ect. I sow special cleaning kits for just muzzle loaders. Is this really needed or can i just use the things i use to clean my 9mm. which is a cleaner/penetrating oil.
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    Member Array JohnD13's Avatar
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    I can't speak to cleaning up with black powder substitutes like Pyrodex or similar products, but, if you use black powder, NEVER use petroleum based products on a muzzleloader for cleaning! You end up with a black tar like mess. Hot water is all you need to clean away black power fowling. TC makes some good products for bore seasoning and rust protection, and I'm sure there are others out there.

  4. #3
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    I have a couple of flintlocks, and if you are using black powder you can clean the weapon using just water and patches.
    Rick

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    Member Array russ1986's Avatar
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    ok thanks i will take a look when i get home in 10 days or so in the store for some stuff any more advice on this will help thanks
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    Member Array rainmaker's Avatar
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    I shoot flint with straight black powder, and hot water + a little dish soap always works for me. Push the ramrod w/soaking wet patch in and out like a plunger. With a caplock, you can fit a plastic or rubber tube over the nipple (other end in a can) to keep the dirty water from spraying all over. With a flintlock, wrap a towel around the stock to help keep the dirty water off the stock and point the touch hole down. Some rifles allow you to easily take the barrell off the stock, which can make things even easier.

    Follow with a couple clean wet patches just to be sure. Follow with dry patches until dry. Follow with light oil. The hotter the water, the better since the bore dries quicker. Cleaning's not complicated, but it can be messy. I don't shoot Pydodex, and I don't know it would any different, but several folks make cleaners specific for Pyrodex.

    Check around your local gun club or range for somebody who shoots muzzleloaders regular. They should be able to give you advice on the care and feeding of a ML, as well as advice on what type you might like to buy.
    Steve

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    Member Array SAnta01's Avatar
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    Above all... MAKE SURE YOUR BARREL IS 100% DRY!!! Before you oil her back up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rainmaker View Post
    Cleaning's not complicated, but it can be messy.
    Never, ever clean a black powder weapon in the house if possible! And if you have to make sure its not on your light colored rug. I speak from experience, fortunatly, NOT mine!

    There is a product that helps bead ands remove water from the barrel, but I can't find the name, and I won't be home to check till mid-November. Meanwhile check this place for black powder supplies:
    Track of the Wolf - Muzzle Loading & Black Powder Guns Kits, Parts, Accoutrements, Rendezvous Gear & Primitive Americana
    Rick

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  9. #8
    Member Array russ1986's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rstickle View Post
    Never, ever clean a black powder weapon in the house if possible! And if you have to make sure its not on your light colored rug. I speak from experience, fortunatly, NOT mine!

    There is a product that helps bead ands remove water from the barrel, but I can't find the name, and I won't be home to check till mid-November. Meanwhile check this place for black powder supplies:
    Track of the Wolf - Muzzle Loading & Black Powder Guns Kits, Parts, Accoutrements, Rendezvous Gear & Primitive Americana
    ok thank you and no i never clean my guns in my house.
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    VIP Member Array xXxplosive's Avatar
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    Warm water with mild dish detergent, then clean water.........then run dry clean patch material through the barrel all the way to the face of the breech plug untill dry.........I let my rifles and/smoothbores stand a couple hours then lube the barrel usually with some patch lube. No oils with petroleum distolites or WD 40 as it kills powder.......

    And....I actually remove the lock and thoroughly clean all the working parts with denatured alchaholl and Q-tips...I know a clean gun is an accurate gun and when I hunt I want no FTF due to maintenance issues...
    Last edited by xXxplosive; October 27th, 2009 at 11:45 AM.

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    I do mine in the kitchen sink...which is stainless steel. The sink is full of water, the hottest it will get.

    The first step is to remove the barrel. The second step is to make a tight fitting plug from patches. I take the nipple off and using the cleaning rod I draw the extremely hot water into the barrel, using the rod as a piston to draw the water in and push the water out.

    At first, the water will be black. As you continue doing it, the water in the barrel will eventually become clean. You may even have to refill the sink again if the water gets dirty.After it is clean and the barrel is dry, you run a patch through the barrel that is saturated with lube. I use the Thompson Center patch lube which is made from vegetable fat. As already mentioned, don't use a lube with petroleum in it as this reacts with the heat and the power residue which makes it really difficult to remove.

    Doing this is the most complete way to clean a barrel. The very hot water will heat the barrel enough to evaporate a lot of the water and once swabbed with a good lube, it should be good to go for quiet awhile. Lube the outside to prevent rust, put the barrel back in and put it up for the next season.
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  12. #11
    VIP Member Array hogdaddy's Avatar
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    +1 on dish soap & hot water, But I use a BUCKET & pull nippel use jag & patch
    Keep it up till water is cleen ; )
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    Member Array chenemf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotGuns View Post
    I do mine in the kitchen sink...which is stainless steel. The sink is full of water, the hottest it will get.

    The first step is to remove the barrel. The second step is to make a tight fitting plug from patches. I take the nipple off and using the cleaning rod I draw the extremely hot water into the barrel, using it the rod as a piston to draw the water in and push the water out.

    At first, the water will be black. As you continue doing it, the water in the barrel will eventually become clean. You may even have to refill the sink again if the water gets dirty.After it is clean and the barrel is dry, you run a patch through the barrel that is saturated with lube. I use the Thompson Center patch lube which is made from vegetable fat. As already mentioned, don't use a lube with petroleum in it as this reacts with the heat and the power residue which makes it really difficult to remove.

    Doing this is the most complete way to clean a barrel. The very hot water will heat the barrel enough to evaporate a lot of the water and once swabbed with a good lube, it should be good to go for quiet awhile. Lube the outside to prevent rust, put the barrel back in and put it up for the next season.

    Ditto on this method. The hotter the water the better especially at the end when you want the heat to dry the barrel.
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  14. #13
    Member Array celticredneck's Avatar
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    Follow the recommendations of both the gun manufacturer and the powder manufacturer.

  15. #14
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    The easist way is to use Gunzilla.

    Gunzilla eliminates using water for cleaning and oiling for lubrication and protection. Clean the gun with Gunzilla as per the instructions and while it is cleaning it will also neutralize the corrosive salts. When the gun is clean, Gunzilla will automatically leave a coating for lubrication and protection.


    here is a testimonial:

    "...Gunzilla's first trip to our muzzleloader deer camp in Michigan's
    Upper Peninsula was a hit. The product worked great for cleaning
    black powder and Pyrodex and even removed a stubborn powder ring
    that conventional cleaners and bore brushes could not. I now use
    Gunzilla on all my firearms due to its effectiveness, non-harmful
    ingredients and easy clean up."

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