"Lock and Load" -- meaning?

This is a discussion on "Lock and Load" -- meaning? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; When the M1 Garand came around, the phrase was Lock the bolt to the rear and load a clip, since the act of loading the ...

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Thread: "Lock and Load" -- meaning?

  1. #31
    Member Array tflhndn's Avatar
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    When the M1 Garand came around, the phrase was Lock the bolt to the rear and load a clip, since the act of loading the clip would release the bolt to close and chamber a round in the process.

    Because of the way it rolls of the tongue and its hollywood usage, the phrase as stuck, even in the military, even though it does not really work for today's weapons (M-16 for example)....

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  3. #32
    Member Array LeChuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    If it started with a M1 Garand, I would have expected "Thumb Clear."



    Guess I'm showing my age, here.
    Ha, no anyone that's fired one can tell you about that. I've done it twice, I can't believe the first time didn't teach me the lesson. I think it actually broke my thumb the second time, not kidding.

    I kind of doubt it's where the term originated, and seeing as how I was not alive nor in the war I can't say whether or not this is where it originated. It's just one of the popular myths that I remember.

  4. #33
    Member Array puffer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeChuck View Post
    Ha, no anyone that's fired one can tell you about that. I've done it twice, I can't believe the first time didn't teach me the lesson. I think it actually broke my thumb the second time, not kidding.


    I was issued an M-I when I entered the Army ( 1960 ) Issued another when I joined the 101st ABN. ( it was replaced with a M-14 in late 1960 )

    M-I "THUMB. = only once. ( day 1 of Basic Issue of Gun.) We were taught how to "clear the thumb" & to this day ( 50 years later ), on the occasions I shoot my M-I I do it automatically.

    As to "lock & Load" I do noy know where it came from, but in my Army days, it was a the "preparatory"Range Command to Commence Firing. ( load, get ready to open fire )

    Puffer

  5. #34
    Member Array LeChuck's Avatar
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    Well you're a better man than I am. It was a hot day and I was a bit sweaty, I think I just slipped. Either that or I got complacent, which won't happen again.

  6. #35
    Distinguished Member Array nutz4utwo's Avatar
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    I always figured the "lock" part referred to locking the lugs of the bolt into the barrel...?
    "a reminder that no law can replace personal responsibility" - Bill Clinton 2010.

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by billfromtx View Post
    Exactly!


    In the Marine Corps when we heard Lock and Load it meant the feces was fixin to make contact with the rotating oscillator!
    In the Security Police, same thing, but we didn't use such nice words LOL LOL, we meant "Chit was going to hit the fan"
    "I dislike death, however, there are some things I dislike more than death. Therefore, there are times when I will not avoid danger" Mencius"

  8. #37
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    My apologies, had to answer that other one, I loved BillfromTXs answer, it was great.

    I've always understood the Load and Lock answer and then it was reversed at some point in time during WWII by whom, I don't know.

    What I do know, it fits perfectly today just the way it is. Some changes are good.
    "I dislike death, however, there are some things I dislike more than death. Therefore, there are times when I will not avoid danger" Mencius"

  9. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by highvoltage View Post
    In a musket you wouldn't lock the hammer back while loading the weapon. The hammer would then be in a position to be released, not very good safety.

    The barrel is loaded with powder, then the ball is rammed down against the load. Only after the ram is clear of the barrel do you lock the hammer back.
    Actually with a flintlock you do lock the hammer back, after a fashion.

    There is a "half-cock" position, that is like a safety position. Half-cock allows the pan to be primed and frizzen closed. When you see a target you then go from half to full cock for the shot. It's the 18th Century equivalent to having "one in the pipe"!
    Rick

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  10. #39
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    Lock and load is a term meant to "lock back the bolt" and begin to load a weapon fed ammo by a belt, "and possibly a clip"

    An armed criminal will kill an unarmed citizen with monotonous regularity.
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  11. #40
    Senior Member Array highvoltage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rstickle View Post
    Actually with a flintlock you do lock the hammer back, after a fashion.

    There is a "half-cock" position, that is like a safety position. Half-cock allows the pan to be primed and frizzen closed. When you see a target you then go from half to full cock for the shot. It's the 18th Century equivalent to having "one in the pipe"!
    Right, but you do that only after you're done playing with the barrel (i.e. loading and ramming).

    So you do all your loading first, then lock the hammer (half-cock, full-cock, etc.).

  12. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by highvoltage View Post
    Right, but you do that only after you're done playing with the barrel (i.e. loading and ramming).

    So you do all your loading first, then lock the hammer (half-cock, full-cock, etc.).
    Actually..... The move to half cock is first on a musket (frizzed open). Since (military) muskets are loaded from a prepackaged paper cartridge containing both powder and the ball, the pan is primed first. The weapon goes to half cock, is primed, frizzen closed. rest of powder poured down barrel followed by the ball, and then rammed home.

    Rifles are loaded with powder, patch and ball first, then primed. Most riflemen I know load and ram with the rifle at half cock and the frizzen open, them prime and close the frizzen.
    Rick

    EOD - Initial success or total failure

  13. #42
    Senior Member Array highvoltage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rstickle View Post
    Actually..... The move to half cock is first on a musket (frizzed open). Since (military) muskets are loaded from a prepackaged paper cartridge containing both powder and the ball, the pan is primed first. The weapon goes to half cock, is primed, frizzen closed. rest of powder poured down barrel followed by the ball, and then rammed home.

    Rifles are loaded with powder, patch and ball first, then primed. Most riflemen I know load and ram with the rifle at half cock and the frizzen open, them prime and close the frizzen.
    Hmm, interesting.

    Here's something else I dug up that explains the safety nature of "half-cock":

    A cock tightly holding a sharp piece of flint is rotated to half-cock, where the sear falls into a safety notch on the tumbler, preventing an accidental discharge.
    That's something that hadn't been mentioned yet. Others mentioned half-cock being a safe position, but hadn't explained why.

  14. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    Q: The phrase "Lock and Load!" means what to you?

    Meaning, if you were to hear the phrase "lock and load" called out to you, what do you think it is you're supposed to do?

    ==========

    (Don't look it up on the internet or elsewhere.)

    I realize there are some prior discussions, some time ago. But it's interesting how many different definitions seem to exist, when asked off the cuff like this. There are certainly many discussions posted here and there, depending where you look.
    What "lock and load" means to me is what was taught to me in basic training 40 years ago--insert a loaded magazine, chamber a round, safety off, prepare to fire on command.
    Lots of history here tho.

  15. #44
    Member Array EXHSLD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rstickle View Post
    Actually..... The move to half cock is first on a musket (frizzed open). Since (military) muskets are loaded from a prepackaged paper cartridge containing both powder and the ball, the pan is primed first. The weapon goes to half cock, is primed, frizzen closed. rest of powder poured down barrel followed by the ball, and then rammed home.

    Rifles are loaded with powder, patch and ball first, then primed. Most riflemen I know load and ram with the rifle at half cock and the frizzen open, them prime and close the frizzen.
    ^^^^^BINGO^^^^^


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    It means get ready to rumble!
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