"Lock and Load" -- meaning? - Page 4

"Lock and Load" -- meaning?

This is a discussion on "Lock and Load" -- meaning? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Don't you know? "Lock and load" was coined by John Wayne in the "Sands of Iwo Jima"....

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Thread: "Lock and Load" -- meaning?

  1. #46
    VIP Member Array zacii's Avatar
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    Don't you know? "Lock and load" was coined by John Wayne in the "Sands of Iwo Jima".
    Trust in God and keep your powder dry

    "A heavily armed citizenry is not about overthrowing the government; it is about preventing the government from overthrowing liberty. A people stripped of their right of self defense is defenseless against their own government." -source


  2. #47
    Senior Member Array Beans's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billfromtx View Post
    Exactly!


    In the Marine Corps when we heard Lock and Load it meant the feces was fixin to make contact with the rotating oscillator!
    As an Old BAR man it was used to incidate that the bolt was locked to the rear, a loaded mag inserted and the war was about to start.

    The same was true for the Machine gunners, except they inserted a belt instead of a magazine.

    USMC 1961-1971 retired

  3. #48
    Member Array das38spl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zacii View Post
    Don't you know? "Lock and load" was coined by John Wayne in the "Sands of Iwo Jima".
    Great movie!!!!
    Love the scene where the "Duke" zonks the Jap in the tractor hopper:
    "Hey! Why'd ya SHOOT him?"
    "I was afraid the FALL might KILL him....!"

  4. #49
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    I'm not surprised if it has historical meaning. Today I believe it means Load a magazine, Chamber a round and Safety on.

    More like load and lock now.
    If you understand, things are just as they are... If you do not understand, things are just as they are....
    - Zen Saying

  5. #50
    Member Array ScotWarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highvoltage View Post
    In a musket you wouldn't lock the hammer back while loading the weapon. The hammer would then be in a position to be released, not very good safety.

    The barrel is loaded with powder, then the ball is rammed down against the load. Only after the ram is clear of the barrel do you lock the hammer back.
    true, but with one caveat: in many muzzleloaders, to lock the hammer back also referred to the half-cock action, which left the priming pan open for loading. the phrase "locked and loaded" as i knew it came about from the idea that the priming pan was charged and the hammer somewhere rearward of the flash hole, be it full or half cock. it meant that you were a firm trigger squeeze away from one dusted BG somewhere.

    i read somewhere about the habit of early Americans, during their insurgency with the UK, would carry the firearm loaded when on the move, so they only had to charge the pan and cock the hammer.

    and as an Army grunt, i have to say, tongue in cheek, only the Marines have the ego to believe the rest of the free world is as USMC-centric as they are....ha ha, Semper Fi, guys.
    "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect every one who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined" ~Patrick Henry

  6. #51
    Member Array ming's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScotWarrior View Post

    and as an Army grunt, i have to say, tongue in cheek, only the Marines have the ego to believe the rest of the free world is as USMC-centric as they are....ha ha, Semper Fi, guys.
    Hey, when you know you are the best you have the right to be USMC-centric.

    Joking aside, you gotta love any grunt.

  7. #52
    Distinguished Member Array razor02097's Avatar
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    There are only 2 types of people...
    Ones that are a United States Marine and those who wish they where.

    Oorah
    There is something about firing 4,200 thirty millimeter rounds/min that makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

  8. #53
    Senior Member Array highvoltage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScotWarrior View Post
    true, but with one caveat: in many muzzleloaders, to lock the hammer back also referred to the half-cock action, which left the priming pan open for loading. the phrase "locked and loaded" as i knew it came about from the idea that the priming pan was charged and the hammer somewhere rearward of the flash hole, be it full or half cock. it meant that you were a firm trigger squeeze away from one dusted BG somewhere.....
    True, with the exception of half-cock. After reading the responses I did some more digging (i.e. Google) and found that half-cock is a actually a safety position. A sear falls into a safety notch on the tumbler thus preventing an accidental discharge. In your scenario you wouldn't be a trigger squeeze away from dusting a BG if the hammer were in half-cock.

  9. #54
    Member Array ScotWarrior's Avatar
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    true, if in half cock. i was trying to remember what i'd heard about the phrase and what it meant. i think faster than i type, but neither is fast...

    btw, that does prompt a question of my own - obviously in half cock you'd need to resume the rearward motion on the hammer prior to ignition. but once at full cock, what's the trigger pull on a musket?

    to all my jarhead friends, again, Semper Fi, and as posted, you gotta love any grunt. even Marines.
    "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect every one who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined" ~Patrick Henry

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by highvoltage View Post
    That's something that hadn't been mentioned yet. Others mentioned half-cock being a safe position, but hadn't explained why.
    Also most modern people actually call the "cock" the "hammer", We just let them do that, it saves on the confusion!!!

    A test of a properly working flintlock safety system is to move the cock to the half cocked position, then support the weight of the musket/rifle by the trigger. If the weapon stays at half cock the system is working correctly!
    Rick

    EOD - Initial success or total failure

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScotWarrior View Post
    btw, that does prompt a question of my own - obviously in half cock you'd need to resume the rearward motion on the hammer prior to ignition. but once at full cock, what's the trigger pull on a musket?
    You have it correct, to remove the weapon from safe you go to full cock, then pull the trigger.

    The trigger pull is something harder to answer, because it varies, just like on todays modern weapons. The lightest trigger pulls are of rifles that have a "set trigger", a system that looks like two triggers inside the trigger guard. The trigger pull after "setting" the trigger can be ounces!

    BTW: another strange fact... Muskets are not really meant to be aimed, they have NO sights!! That thing at the end of the barrel is the bayonet lug!!
    Rick

    EOD - Initial success or total failure

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