A lesson to be learned about trigger jobs

A lesson to be learned about trigger jobs

This is a discussion on A lesson to be learned about trigger jobs within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I have a friend who reworked a trigger one summer on one of his hunting rifles. He made it nice and light and it felt ...

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Thread: A lesson to be learned about trigger jobs

  1. #1
    Ex Member Array one eyed fatman's Avatar
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    A lesson to be learned about trigger jobs

    I have a friend who reworked a trigger one summer on one of his hunting rifles. He made it nice and light and it felt real good. Shot just fine. Along came the hunting season and he was ready to go. He went out to his hunting site and loaded a round. The minute he closed the bolt the round fired. He said what the heck what happened. Loaded up another round and the same thing happened. He had made the trigger so light that the metal contraction in cold weather caused the rifle to fire with the closing of the bolt.

    I've also heard you should reload your ammo according to the temperature and altitude your going to be shooting at. Any thoughts on this? Is there a reloading calculator for this?


  2. #2
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    The temperature thing is IMO taking things a bit far - unless for avid benchrest guys.

    As for the trigger - it is IMO foolish to rework a trigger to that extent - be it handgun, rifle, shottie - whatever. I am keen to have a smooth, creep-free trigger more than ultra light (read over-sensitive) poundage.

    Actual ''set triggers'' are a different matter - but this guy quite obviously got way too enthusiastic with a stone - possibly screwed up sear/notch angles too. New trigger group is his solution - tho better to not overdo things in first place!
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    I don't think you need to reload according to altitude. You will need to re sight in if you change enough elevation though. I do not like reworked triggers unless profesionally done.
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    Good lesson on a trigger. Happily for him, it's not usually too expensive to replace the part he filed down. Hunting rifles should never have a trigger like that. Sniper rifles, yes, hunting, no.

    As for loading, there probably are people who load to the temp and altitude, but I haven't found that it matters. I suppose it could make a difference if you are doing some really long range shooting at targets. I'm not aware of a calculator for it, however.
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    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    Not for Altitude but for temp sure..

    Some powders don't like to prefer the same in the 80 degree summer weather when you loaded them they don't preform the same at all in 0 degree weather you out hunting in..


    This is a big enough issue some Powder Makers like Hodgdon make Extreme powders that are temp insentive

    Matter of Fact i had this problem with the 500 Smith this winter and can only figure it was powder related since they would only pop and Fizz when cold.. But soon as it warmed up to 50 degrees they went BOOM

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    Bud hit it.

    I've also heard you should reload your ammo according to the temperature and altitude your going to be shooting at. Any thoughts on this? Is there a reloading calculator for this?
    There is a good one here....

    JBM Ballistics
    http://www.eskimo.com/~jbm/calculati...culations.html

  7. #7
    Member Array Brian45's Avatar
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    The Speer reloading manuals #9 and #10 recommends using magnum primers if ammunition will be shot at or below 0 degrees F. The Speer #13 recommends magnum rifle primers if ammunition will be fired at or below 20 degrees F.

    I have also heard of problems with using max loads developed at average temperatures in hot temperatures. When I first started reloading a gunsmith I know told me of somebody that went on a African safari and used some hot loads he developed in average temperatures. The gun was damaged when he shot it.
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  8. #8
    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian45
    The Speer reloading manuals #9 and #10 recommends using magnum primers if ammunition will be shot at or below 0 degrees F. The Speer #13 recommends magnum rifle primers if ammunition will be fired at or below 20 degrees F.

    I have also heard of problems with using max loads developed at average temperatures in hot temperatures. When I first started reloading a gunsmith I know told me of somebody that went on a African safari and used some hot loads he developed in average temperatures. The gun was damaged when he shot it.

    Rifles' Handloader is a good Mag to read it warns and tells of this kind of thing happening where the case expands to much due to the extreme heat and can sometime jam and cause a rifle to Blow up

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    Distinguished Member Array RSSZ's Avatar
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    To me temp only matters to the extreme.

    The ammo that I hand loaded right up to the max,for winter night time hunting in Maine(-20deg.) would not be safe to shoot in your AR, hunting summertime critters in AZ. But other than that,I have chrone'ed some of the same loads(of different calibers) with a temp difference of 50-60deg.and I saw such a mild difference in velocity that it wouldn't matter unless you was shootin' 600+ yds. at a softball size target.

    Workin' triggers is another thing alltogether. Some(most) of the trigger realated parts are hard faced. Take that away,with some material,and/or change some angles and ..........OOPS !! ---------Edit >>> this is why some of the "trigger jobs" that I do for my friends are simply a very fine polish(which, if done right, takes some time)and a small bit of well placed moly grease. This,not overlooking the pins that everything swivels/hinges/rotates on. --------
    Last edited by RSSZ; June 27th, 2006 at 09:39 AM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Array David III's Avatar
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    I've seen people run into problems when reloading varmint ammo like 223 and 22-250 where they load right up to (stupid) max pressure and it shoots fine for a three shot group. Then they take off for Wyoming and shoot the gun as fast as they can.
    Something breaks. Cases fail, etc. Hot, hot barrel with max load really doesn't work well. Midrange loads seem to do fine even with a hot barrel.
    I think RSSZ has it on a trigger job, just time polishing and a bit of lube and you get a better trigger. My favorite was a friend who did a trigger job on his AR-15 and then found that instead of getting one round, he had a 3-round trigger. Sure filled the truck full of brass in a hurry!

  11. #11
    Senior Member Array blueyedevil's Avatar
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    Sounds like your buddy just "adjusted" a Rem 700 trigger to below 3.5lbs, 700's are notorious for this exact scenario. If you want to get a crisp pull below 3.5lbs, you need to buy an aftermarket trigger assembly (Jewel, Timney, etc.).

    As for pressure deviations in reloads, it depends on your recipe. Some powders are extremely temp. stable and if loaded correctly with low ES and SD verified by chrony. They can handle pretty extreme temp and altitude variation without significant pressure deviation. Then again a lot of riflemen have only a basic understanding of rifle reloading, so it's no surprise that this is a common problem.

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