handling your guns

This is a discussion on handling your guns within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Am, I the only one who when I get a new gun that I can't shoot, I will just sit and hold it lovingly, maybe ...

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Thread: handling your guns

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array INccwchris's Avatar
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    handling your guns

    Am, I the only one who when I get a new gun that I can't shoot, I will just sit and hold it lovingly, maybe looking specifically at a certain part, polish it a bit, clean it when it dosen't need it, anything to have it in my hands? Am I the only one who does this with a new gun that I havn't shot yet, or are there other people that enjoy just holding and cleaning their guns
    "The value you put on the lost will be determined by the sacrifice you are willing to make to seek them until they are found."

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    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    I do that to some degree. It's important to get familiar with a new carry weapon. Holding it to get used to the feel, weight, sight picture, etc. is a part of that process. The first thing I do is read the manual. The second thing I do is disassemble, clean, and reassembe...it is an important part of learning a new weapon. Understanding the weapon, features, and inspecting it for anything that doesn't look right or feel right is important as well. Snap caps and dry-firing it is also a good part of getting familiar with trigger pull and keeping it on POA. As long as you're taking the proper precautions (triple checking that it is unloaded, muzzle control, etc.) I think that is all part of getting familiar with a new weapon. I personally try to be as familiar as possible with a new weapon before I fire it the first time anyway. I think it's a prudent thing to do as long as you do it safely.
    Know Guns, Know Safety, Know Peace.
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    Senior Member Array Tala's Avatar
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    Before I got to shoot my XD I handled it every night before I went to bed. Like Bugdude said, read the manual, practiced taking it apart and reassembling, anything really, I just had to get a good feel for it.
    I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them. -- John Wayne as John B. Books in "The Shootist"

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    Senior Member Array TheShadow's Avatar
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    Am I the only one who does this with a new gun that I havn't shot yet, or are there other people that enjoy just holding and cleaning their guns
    Yeah my wife thinks I'm cheating on her when I get caught cuddling up with my new purchase...
    * knock knock* "WHAT ARE YOU DOING IN THERE!!!!"

  6. #5
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    I seriously doubt you are the only one. We guns lovers are a passionate group and I can only imagine the stories are very similar. Weeks to months researching and going to gun store to just hold a new hopeful purchase followed by the event. The purchase! Then it goes home and we take it apart, put it together, practice with trigger pull and run it through drills. It is the only way to keep the thrill of the purchase alive until the range day.

    I spend hours with my safe open looking and touching the fine pieces of craftsmanship I have carefully chosen. It is all good stuff! As for my wife, she gets it. She does the same with her hobbies.
    It's not a problem til they make it one!

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    VIP Member Array Eagleks's Avatar
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    It's OK.... you are normal !

    I also clean mine thoroughly, so I"m sure I know how to break it down, etc. as well. It gives me more handling time with it as well.
    I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. --- Will Rogers ---
    Chief Justice John Roberts : "I don't see how you can read Heller and not take away from it the notion that the Second Amendment...was extremely important to the framers in their view of what liberty meant."

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    Member Array Dsimon11's Avatar
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    Haha, you are not alone, I think guys do this with every new toy they acquire.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Array canav844's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BugDude View Post
    I do that to some degree. It's important to get familiar with a new carry weapon. Holding it to get used to the feel, weight, sight picture, etc. is a part of that process. The first thing I do is read the manual. The second thing I do is disassemble, clean, and reassembe...it is an important part of learning a new weapon. Understanding the weapon, features, and inspecting it for anything that doesn't look right or feel right is important as well. Snap caps and dry-firing it is also a good part of getting familiar with trigger pull and keeping it on POA. As long as you're taking the proper precautions (triple checking that it is unloaded, muzzle control, etc.) I think that is all part of getting familiar with a new weapon. I personally try to be as familiar as possible with a new weapon before I fire it the first time anyway. I think it's a prudent thing to do as long as you do it safely.
    Defense tool familiarization. As Massad Ayoob points out, using a firearm is not an instinctual act; therefore we must train and learn to properly manipulate one. Knowing how every last part of your firearm operates, how your holster operates, proper draw, proper room clearing technique, proper flashlight techniques (can you clear your house without illuminating yourself on the walls) trigger discipline, barrel discipline, room clearing (to get to your kids and then out of the house or to a safe room); you can do weak one hand draw reload and malfunction drills with snap caps, you can use 5.11 training barrels (http://www.lapolicegear.com/511-tact...ng-barrel.html) to safely accomplish many other technique practice and training; live fire solidifies everything but building muscle memory and keeping up on those other perishable skills can make your range time more efficient and the rounds you pay to practice with, more valuable. Even just getting a smooth consistent trigger pull and habit of naturally dropping into a good stance are going to make learning and refining other techniques go quicker.

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    I handle them all the time, old and new. I thought everyone did...
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

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    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
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    Yes and no. Yes to the extent of weapon familiarization. Fully agreed on the above regarding manual, disassembly, cleaning and practice. No, to the extent of handling a weapon without a deliberate purpose. Because in my case, I've got weapons all over the place - guns, knives, swords, sticks, staves, and a good number of specialized martial arts weapons. Training with all of these keeps me busy. Every day I practice with at least one weapon, giving it a workout and performing any needed maintenance.

    It's very important that every weapon you own be a natural extension of your body and mind. Sitting around just handling them? No. If you have leisure time, you should be training.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

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    Member Array damien12g's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shockwave View Post
    Yes and no. Yes to the extent of weapon familiarization. Fully agreed on the above regarding manual, disassembly, cleaning and practice. No, to the extent of handling a weapon without a deliberate purpose. Because in my case, I've got weapons all over the place - guns, knives, swords, sticks, staves, and a good number of specialized martial arts weapons. Training with all of these keeps me busy. Every day I practice with at least one weapon, giving it a workout and performing any needed maintenance.

    It's very important that every weapon you own be a natural extension of your body and mind. Sitting around just handling them? No. If you have leisure time, you should be training.
    gotta have some time for fun. since weapons are all over you must not have a family. hence you have more free time.

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    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
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    since weapons are all over you must not have a family. hence you have more free time.
    If I had children running about, I'd have even more to protect and a much higher incentive to train longer and harder. As it is, my regimen involves between 1 to 2 hours a day in physical and weapons training, and 3 hours a week in class. If I could, I'd do more. But just sitting around fondling firearms? You gotta be kidding.

    One of these days, we'll have to have a thread here discussing the modern-day warrior lifestyle. It isn't about stuff, it's about mental and physical preparation for the unknown and unexpected. Since you will rarely, if ever, have advance warning of a serious threat, all you can do is prepare for anything and everything.

    Some people think that "preparation" is buying ammo, or lubricating the firearms, or installing an alarm system, or hardening the doors and windows. Yes, to an extent those things do constitute preparation, but they can all be done with a wallet and some DIY, in between runs to the pizza store and watching stuff on TV. Total preparation means, in my book, hardening the mind and the physical machine that is you to be the best that you can be - regardless of age or limitations. This ought to be the minimum objective, and it's not difficult at all.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

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    It's a touchy, feely thing.....kind of like a new lover.
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    Member Array thedogfather's Avatar
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    Oh yea, I do, especially when I can't get out to shoot as much as I would like. I don't want anyone to feel neglected.

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    Member Array OldLincoln's Avatar
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    Uh, do you wear protection...... Soft lint free white cloves that is? I was taught (over 50 years ago) to NEVER handle a gun without the cotton gloves - period. If a bad guy were coming, it would be: 1) gloves on - check; 2) gun loaded - check; 3) backdrop clear - check; 4) correct shooting position - check; 5) aim correctly - check; 6) breath then hold half - check; 7) slowly squeeze trigger - bang!

    Things have changed a bit since then, but when I inherited my father's Colt Commander, it was in a gun pouch along with a manual and ... gloves. Only need steps 1 & 2 to fondle.

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