Tell me about black powder rifles

This is a discussion on Tell me about black powder rifles within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I just bought a CVA Accura and I am very happy with it. Just pull the trigger on one . You can even shoot it ...

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Thread: Tell me about black powder rifles

  1. #16
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    I just bought a CVA Accura and I am very happy with it. Just pull the trigger on one . You can even shoot it and if you don't like it, get your money back.

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  3. #17
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    Be aware of the twist rate of what you buy, as it will determine what shoots best in your rifle, as opposed to your preferred projectiles. Slower for round balls (1/66), faster for balls and short conicals (1/48) and faster (1/38 or less) for longer conicals and sabots.
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  4. #18
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    I've been doing the same this past year or so. I picked up a T/C Hawken for really cheap. I've been collecting all the stuff needed to shoot BP here and there, but I've yet to shoot the rifle. So, when you get back, we can learn together if you want. Anyway, if you want a Kentucky, then buy a Kentucky. It never made much sense to me to buy something you don't really want only to replace it with what you wanted in the first place.

    Anyway, if you intent is just to kill deer without the extra class or style, an inline is the way to go. If you want an authentic experiance, I'd go with a cap rifle such as a Hawken, and move into the sport from there. The Hawken is really the bench mark do it all entry gun for BP IMO.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  5. #19
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    Sixto, obviously I'm not going to be getting any deer use out of it until next year. I think I may try to get a simple inline to start out with, and to learn on, and then when I get back in the summer for good, get a kit and make a Kentucky. I think for Ohio hunting something more modern and a bit more weather resistant might serve me better. And when it comes to guns, I really want one, or more, of all of them anyways. Class and style aren't my strong suits anyways. But, if you don't plan on deer slaying with your rifle this year, we can learn the nuances this summer and then try to get a deer or two next winter.

    BTW, did the new castle nut ever come in? If it didn't, no worries, but I'm gonna be back in Ohio in a couple of weeks, so if it did, I'll pick it up. I gotta stop looking at Vance's Flyers, the gun safe is already full enough.
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  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guantes View Post
    Be aware of the twist rate of what you buy, as it will determine what shoots best in your rifle, as opposed to your preferred projectiles. Slower for round balls (1/66), faster for balls and short conicals (1/48) and faster (1/38 or less) for longer conicals and sabots.
    Good point to consider.
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  7. #21
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    Yup, I got the castle nut. A cheapo inline isn't a bad way to go, but the used market is flooded with quality cap rifles and you can pick one up cheap. I've learned that there is a ton of difference between the inlines and more primitive rifles, so I'm not sure how much learning will transfer towards your ultimate goal.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  8. #22
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    Sixto, I would have a Hawken if I could have found your deal. I havn't seen any in that condition at that price.

  9. #23
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    I started out with a .45 percussion Kentucky rifle replica 40 years ago and really enjoyed that puppy. It accounted for a lot of squirrels, although the "Kentucky Squirrel Rifle" is usually a .36 or even a .32 caliber. There was a plaque on the side opposite of the lock, and I had my name engraved on it. Even though it is a replica, it is an heirloom to us.

    After giving the Kentucky to my son, I got an inline .50 CVA with a synthetic stock. It was all of $109 from Wally World 15 years ago. It was easier to use and keep dry. I gave it to my step-grandson last year.

    I've always wanted a .58 caliber Civil War replica. I've shot them but never got one. That .58 cal. conical minie ball sure packs a wallop!

    Check this site to see what I'm talking about: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rifles_...ican_Civil_War

    Whatever you get, you will spend a LOT of time cleaning!!!
    Last edited by rglyons; December 5th, 2010 at 12:51 PM.
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  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckeyeLCPL View Post
    But I am a huge military history guy, and eventually would like at least replicas of early American arms, like the Kentucky long rifle.

    I use the Pyrodex pellets when I take the 1851 out, I like it, a lot less for me to screw up that with the actual powder.
    Just a quick point.... If you go with a flintlock at any time plan on using "real" black powder. Pyrodex and flintlocks don't play well together at all. I have yet to hear about a flintlock working will with any of the "modern" black powder substitutes.
    Rick

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  11. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    Yup, I got the castle nut. A cheapo inline isn't a bad way to go, but the used market is flooded with quality cap rifles and you can pick one up cheap. I've learned that there is a ton of difference between the inlines and more primitive rifles, so I'm not sure how much learning will transfer towards your ultimate goal.
    I'll look around at the local used market some when I am home in a couple of weeks, see what I can dig up, especially the week after Christmas could be a good time to do so I would think.

    rglyons - I am aware that with anything BP you spend a lot more time cleaning and loading that you will actually shooting, I am ok with that.

    rstickle, I know that back in the flint/match/wheel lock days they used to have two powders, one that was ground finer for the pan, and then one that was more coarse that was actually the charge for the rifle. If you are going to carry one powderhorn, you might as well carry two I guess. But thank you, I will keep that in mind.
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  12. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckeyeLCPL View Post
    rstickle, I know that back in the flint/match/wheel lock days they used to have two powders, one that was ground finer for the pan, and then one that was more coarse that was actually the charge for the rifle. If you are going to carry one powderhorn, you might as well carry two I guess. But thank you, I will keep that in mind.
    Would you believe.........

    There were (are) actually 4 grades of black powder, FG (1FG) through FFFFG (4FG). and they are usually considered in order cannon, musket, rifled, and (the 4FG) primer.

    All my flintlocks are rifled and I use (FFFG) down the barrel and either FFFG or FFFFG for primer, depending on how fast I need to shoot. Most of the military weapons (muskets) of the period load from a paper cartridge and use 2FG for both both primer and main charge.
    Rick

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  13. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiefjason View Post
    Try to get an inline that either breaks open or opens easily to access the breech plug. If there are lots of moving parts, they will be a real hassle to remove when cleaning. If you can swing the money go for stainless steel. It does not corrode the barrel as easily. However, even with SS I made the mistake of letting it sit after shooting on during ML season. By the time I got to cleaning it there were some pits starting. GRRR. I have a Remington Genesis that I am happy with. When you start shooting, go with the pyrodex pellets or similar. I'm getting ready to move away from sabots and use the Powerbelt bullets that mount on the plastic belts.
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Definitely an inline that breaks at the breach( Its much easier to clean and adress any issues that may arise), and stainless if you can swing it.

    My .45 cal. Black Diamond is SS but the breach plug is not and it does show some rust. Who cares?, its a work gun.

    My son has a Optima, by CVA and we love it.
    It breaks open(kind of like a single shot shotgun), and is way easier to clean than my BL D.

    All you do with an inline is charge the rifle with the correct amount of powder, or pellets,(we stick with 2 -50 gr.) though they can handle 150 gr total., fit your sabot slug( a plastic sleeve with your projectile in it, ram it down all the way,(started of course with a bullet starter), and once its down all the way to the powder, all you have to do is fit a 209 primer in there[in the breach plug] and your ready to touch off a round!!!!

    Great fun
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  14. #28
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    Buckeye, I have owned 3 muzzleloaders. All were just hunting guns, nothing fancy. Here is what I can tell you. If you want an inline to hunt with that is built great and will last a lifetime buy a Thompson Center Omega. They are relatively cheap (around $299). They are built like a tank. They are VERY simple to clean and maintain. Most important, they are dead nuts accurate. They also have a nice one piece stock that shoulders like a bolt gun.

    Other muzzleloaders may come with more "bells" but the Omega, IMO, is the best out there for the money.

    Try to stay away from anything with a two piece stock unless it is a high end gun (TC Encore or similar). The cheaper guns just come with a screw to hold the fore end on. Any change in pressure on this screw can change the point of impact by several inches at 100 yds. I have a NEF muzzleloader that would change POI buy about 5 inches every time I disassembled the gun.

    My advice is to spend a few bucks more and get the TC. If you only want a great hunting gun and not a collector piece you will not regret it.

    Too bad you didn't post this sooner. I'd have given you a CVA for free but my cousin beat you to it. : (


    ETA: Also try 777 powder. It's sugar based instead of sulfur based so you don't need to clean your barrel all the time. Once hunting season starts I shoot my gun once to foul the barrel and then I don't clean it until the season is over. Try that with BP or pyrodex and you'll ruin your gun.
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  15. #29
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    Thanks for the tip on the powder Timmy. Thats something to look out for with the stocks too, hadn't thought of that.

    My favorite gun store back home has the Omega starter kit for $330, its one of the ones I've been eyeballing in their add, since it has all that other random stuff I'll need to go with the rifle.

    I might need your input a bit next year when I start getting into this.
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  16. #30
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    Same advice as when picking your EDC: try out a few and see which tickles your fancy.
    A little less convenient with a rifle that loads from the front end: locate and visit a local muzzle loading club, go to the Log Cabin Shop in Lodi, rub elbows with fellows who shoot BP long guns.
    Several opinions have been offered and all are good.
    My preference in whick black powder rifle, is my own, and that is as it should be: as the wise man said, you pays-a you money and takes-a you choice.
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