640 vs 649

640 vs 649

This is a discussion on 640 vs 649 within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I've been looking a J-frames, and for the life of me I can't figure out the difference between a S&W 640 and 649. The only ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23

Thread: 640 vs 649

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member
    Array Xader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,553

    640 vs 649

    I've been looking a J-frames, and for the life of me I can't figure out the difference between a S&W 640 and 649.

    The only visible difference is that the 640 is somewhat squared off, while the 649 is rounded.

    What is the difference, which do you prefer, and why?


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    9,117
    If I dont have them mixed up, the 640 has a completely concealed hammer making it DAO. The 649 has a hammer shroud giving it the option of cocking it for a single action if desired, but providing snag resisistance of the 640. I have decided on the 649 myself as I like the option of single action, but the snag resistance of the 640.

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member
    Array Xader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,553
    That got my attention.

    I'm a 1911-nut, so SA is a big plus for me.

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    9,117
    The mastery of the double action stroke is paramount if carrying a revolver for SD. It can be shot very accurately this way, and very, very fast. The single action is a good option to have, in my opinion for shots that may be a littke further out there and require more precision. I think of it as a tactical advantage to have both.

  5. #5
    Distinguished Member
    Array Xader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,553
    Oh, I'm absolutely with you on the SD part.

    I'd just love to have the SA option for familiarity's sake, while getting used to shooting a snubby. I don't get to shoot em very often.

    Once the aim is good, then I could work on mastering the DA pull.
    Last edited by Xader; December 14th, 2010 at 07:51 PM.

  6. #6
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    9,117
    Work on the DA stroke first, as its the weapons primary way of being fired.

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    5,272
    And...there are at least two ways to implement double action.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

  8. #8
    Distinguished Member
    Array Xader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,553
    How do you mean?

  9. #9
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    5,272
    There are at least two techniques for double action fire.
    One, is a straight pull through with no pause.
    Two, is pulling until the cylinder locks, a slight pause, then pulling through, giving a feel similar to single action.
    The second method is usually accomplished with the trigger finger inserted farther in, so the tip of the trigger finger touches the frame at the rear of the trigger guard at the point of cylinder lockup.
    With practice, both can be quite fast.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

  10. #10
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    9,117
    I call the first method Guantes mentioned "stacking the trigger".

  11. #11
    Distinguished Member
    Array Xader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,553
    Quote Originally Posted by Guantes View Post
    Two, is pulling until the cylinder locks, a slight pause, then pulling through, giving a feel similar to single action.
    The second method is usually accomplished with the trigger finger inserted farther in, so the tip of the trigger finger touches the frame at the rear of the trigger guard at the point of cylinder lockup.
    With practice, both can be quite fast.
    This method sounds like you're using the trigger to manually cock the hammer, similar to thumbing the hammer on old SA revolvers, leaving it ready to fire in SA.

    Or am I misunderstanding?

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    5,272
    Similar, but there is no catch to hold the hammer when using the trigger.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    9,117
    Xader, for all the publicity and attention the j frames get, they are an experts weapon. I sometimes cringe when I hear them recommended to a first time shooter. The 1911 is one of the easiest guns to shoot. The small snub demands practice and skill to shoot effectively. If you can shoot a DA snub well, you are indeed a good shot.

    The inherent accuracy of the snub is as good as any gun. But mastery of the trigger is vital to bringing this out.

  14. #14
    VIP Member
    Array ksholder's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3,977
    Quote Originally Posted by Guantes View Post
    Two, is pulling until the cylinder locks, a slight pause, then pulling through, giving a feel similar to single action.
    When I do this on my 642, it works fine on 4 chambers, but for the 5th chamber there is no "sweet spot", it simply goes straight through and fires. Does anybody else have this issue? Is it normal? I appreciate your input.
    It's the Land of Opportunity, not the Land of Entitlements - Vote America!!!

    "When governments fear the people there is liberty. When the people fear the government there is tyranny." Thomas Jefferson

    You are only paranoid until you are right - then you are a visionary.

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    5,272
    NO, I would not say that is normal, although I would not consider it a major problem. The two primary variables are the cylinder slots and the portrusions at the base of the star fingers that the hand operates against. I would look for variations in these areas. And/or take it to a smith and have it looked at.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

640 vs 649
,
difference between smith and wesson 640 and 649
,
s&w 640 review
,

s&w 640 vs 649

,

s&w 649 review

,
s&w 649 reviews
,
s&w 649 vs 640
,
smith & wesson 640 vs 649
,
smith and wesson 640 review
,

smith and wesson 640 vs 649

,

smith and wesson 649 review

,
smith wesson 649 review
Click on a term to search for related topics.