Gunsmithing

Gunsmithing

This is a discussion on Gunsmithing within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I would like to improve my gun cleaning skills, and eventually greatly improve my gunsmithing, however I am not particularly sure how to go about ...

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Thread: Gunsmithing

  1. #1
    Member Array Tros's Avatar
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    Question Gunsmithing

    I would like to improve my gun cleaning skills, and eventually greatly improve my gunsmithing, however I am not particularly sure how to go about improving myself on this subject matter.

    I am looking for advice and suggestions. Thank you in advance.
    Beretta 92FS


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    What kind of gun ?

  3. #3
    Member Array Tros's Avatar
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    Well, thats just it. I'd like to be able to improve my general skills for all firearms.

    Or are you suggesting that is how people improve; by focusing on one firearm at a time?
    Beretta 92FS

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    I think one firearm at a time is the way to go ya learn it and move on slow but still if your not going pro

  5. #5
    Member Array Tros's Avatar
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    Well, that makes sense. Thanks, Bud White.
    Beretta 92FS

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array hsuCowboy98's Avatar
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    I got started by breaking down and refinishing mil-surp rifles. There are certain basics that every firearm has in common, and it is the mastery of these specific skills that will lend you a great hand in improving your skills on other weapons.

    I would suggest that you buy a couple of beater weapons, maybe a couple of yugo mausers, or some mosin pistols. Then take them apart, and put them together, clean the dog out of them, and test differant methods of cleaning and maintaining on them. At 90-100 a pop, you can afford to make some mistakes. You can even practice glass bedding, and some other more advanced techniques on these basic weapons. Removing gobs of cosmoline will test anyones mettle after awhile, but you will learn the intricate workings of basic actions, and learn what is normal, and what is not.

    Once youve got that down, move up to something more complex, like SKS' or AK's. Once again more complex=slightly more money, but were not talking thousands here...hundreds is more reasonable. You could even go bargain shopping and pick up some old revolvers and autos to practice on...who cares if they work right..you need to learn right? Look for what causes these to jam, how they work, what normal wear looks like, and what cant be attributed to normal wear.

    By working your way up from basic types of firearm actions to more complex ones, you will build a good solid background, and learn what works and doesnt work in referance to making repairs and improvements. Dont be afraid to try something, and dont be afraid to ask for advice. There are plenty of great sites online to get help from, so use that massive database.

    Ohh, and you will want quality tools. I started with a set from wheeler engineering awhile back, and it has been extremely useful. DONOT use normal automotive tools on your guns, as you will mess up the screws and the areas around them. Use the right tools for the right jobs.
    http://www.battenfeldtechnologies.com/562194.html
    and these
    http://www.battenfeldtechnologies.com/186740.html

    Good luck, and have fun working on your guns.
    Fear No Evil.

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    like me im working on 1911''s right now i do know some ar-15 stuff not a whole lot but enough to get me by for now

    Pretty much same with wheelies colts i know how to work on

    Smith i can get by

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array hsuCowboy98's Avatar
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    Once you step up to an AR-15 with the vast multitude of potential problems, a simple tension problem in a revolver seems easy.
    Fear No Evil.

  9. #9
    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    Hsu is right also start with mil serps i did i start on a sks back when they could be had for 100$

  10. #10
    Distinguished Member Array Black Knight's Avatar
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    Gunsmithing

    Check out the American Gunsmithing Institute. they have many armorers courses on video. As a member you also get a monthly magazine. You also get a certificate for $5.00 off a Brownells catalog. Check them out.

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    Member Array Brian45's Avatar
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    +1 on the AGI videos. I have one for the S&W revolvers. The production quality is poor but the content is excellent.
    NRA Life Member

    "All That Later"

  13. #13
    Member Array Tros's Avatar
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    Thank you all. All helpful posts :)
    Beretta 92FS

  14. #14
    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    Tros some of it is not hard all depends how brave you are and if you will put out $$ for tools


    Here is My combat commander bought last friday i restaked the plunger tube on it

    Refitted the ejector and repinned

    and fit a ambi saftey since I'm a lefty


    All in all about 2 hours worth of work will watching tv and taking dog out




  15. #15
    Distinguished Member Array RSSZ's Avatar
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    Go to the Brownell's site. Order a catalog(free with a order) and take a look in it for the books that they offer. They are some of the simplest to read and understand that I have seen. I have several and they have helped me in the "no booger up" area.

    To me with firearms working slow is the main thing. Before you pick up a tool,stop and think what you want to accomplish and exactly how your gonna proceed. Before you start a job make sure that you have the proper tools to finish it.

    Also as stated above,the tools that you buy for gunsmith duties are unique. Use then ONLY on gunz. Do not over torque.Have some LockTite on hand. Also some very small screwdrivers,ordenary nail files,and small pieces of very fine stones. Would reccommend hard Arkansas. The different grades(smooth/rough) come in a kit from lots of places.

    As stated,get a Brownell's catalog first and start your Christmas list.-------

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