Test a gun without firing it?

This is a discussion on Test a gun without firing it? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I'm just wondering, if I go to look at a used gun is there a good way to tell if the gun is really working ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: test a gun without firing it?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    1,146

    test a gun without firing it?

    I'm just wondering, if I go to look at a used gun is there a good way to tell if the gun is really working properly without actually firing it?

    I was thinking if I brought some snap-caps I would be able to test that it can be chambered, and properly eject a round. With certain kinds I can even test the firing pin. Are there any other tests I can do?

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Distinguished Member Array deadguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    1,612
    it would depend on the shop you buy it from and what they will allow you to do. Also, having knowledge of how a particular gun platform should function without firing it would help as well. Unfortunately, without firing live rounds I don;t think you would ever be able to tell how it will function. People buy new guns everyday that don't function well out of the box.

  4. #3
    Ex Member Array Yankeejib's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    1,003
    Quote Originally Posted by adric22 View Post
    I'm just wondering, if I go to look at a used gun is there a good way to tell if the gun is really working properly without actually firing it?

    I was thinking if I brought some snap-caps I would be able to test that it can be chambered, and properly eject a round. With certain kinds I can even test the firing pin. Are there any other tests I can do?
    It's a lot easier to check out a used revolver than a semi. You can check lock up, alignment, timing, and the firing pin without shooting. With a semi, you're basically field stripping it to look for uncommon wear or anything funky.

    I always look at assembly screws. If knuckleheads have used improper tools to disassemble things, their work is suspect.

  5. #4
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S. Florida, north of the Miami mess, south of the Mouse trap
    Posts
    14,527
    Snapcaps will help but not definite. Drop a wood pencil in the barrel, eraser end first, and pull the trigger. The pencil should pop out, showing that the firing pin/striker is working. In the end, nothing is solid proof other than putting rounds thru it.

    In all used (and many new) tranactions, let the buyer beware.
    azchevy likes this.
    Retired USAF E-8. Avatar is OldVet from days long gone. Oh, to be young again.
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  6. #5
    Member Array Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NW Oregon
    Posts
    320
    Work the action, and inspect the overall condition of the handgun. One way to check the firing pin of a semi-auto is to use a wood pencil with eraser. Make sure the gun shop folks know what you are doing and why. Cycle the action so the pistol is in a cocked condition. Drop the pencil into the barrel, eraser first, so it comes to rest against the breech, muzzle up. Activating the trigger will cause the pencil to be launched from the barrel if the firing pin is in working condition. (With some models, you may have to have an empty magazine inserted to "fire.")
    Follow all safety rules every time you handle a firearm.
    Sui juris
    U.S. Navy Veteran '65-'69
    Retired Police Detective '71 - '01
    LEOSA Certified
    NRA Life Member / SAF Member
    U.S. Constitution (c) 1791, All Rights Reserved.

  7. #6
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    texas
    Posts
    15,093
    I've bought several used guns in my life from reputable dealers and never had a problem,buying from private sellers is where it gets tricky,they may be trying to sell a gun that is either a jam queen or that they screwed up trying to "FIX" it
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
    --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington , DC .

  8. #7
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    ct
    Posts
    1,887
    how to 'test drive' a gun.....semi and revolver is part of a Basic Pistol Class. was it that your instructor ran short of time and skipped that part of the lesson ( course that would be like a driving instructor who doesn't bother to teach you how to back up.....but) or is there a particular type of gun that interests you which is outside what a beginner would be typically interested in? like a 1895 Nagant or a 1914 Mauser?

    -----------------

    any updates on the promised "Carry UnChambered Forum"? seems to have slipped below the radar.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    1,146
    Quote Originally Posted by claude clay View Post
    or is there a particular type of gun that interests you which is outside what a beginner would be typically interested in? like a 1895 Nagant or a 1914 Mauser?
    As stated in another thread, I'm looking at several WWII era guns. Sorry my CHL instructor didn't train me on testing of 1930's era Lugers and Mausers.

  10. #9
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    ct
    Posts
    1,887
    my answer went to the question as the OP phrased it in the current thread. it is not incumbent upon each member here to keep track of what every other member
    may have said in different threads and relative to different ways that ones statements may be connected.

    though i am interested in the promised "Carry UnChambered Thread"

    what became of it?

    -----------> 1895 Nagant is not a Luger. and the 1930's is not near to the numbers in the guns mentioned names. FWIW

  11. #10
    Senior Member Array canav844's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    589
    Glock has several tests for armorers that I can use to verify proper function without firing, on Glocks. When it comes to other firearms if you have an understanding of the engineering you should be able to determine with some certainty of the odds of it being functioning.

    Glock Certified Armorer

  12. #11
    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    1,146
    Quote Originally Posted by claude clay View Post
    my answer went to the question as the OP phrased it in the current thread. it is not incumbent upon each member here to keep track of what every other member may have said in different threads and relative to different ways that ones statements may be connected.
    Yes, except I WAS the original poster on this topic, so the response was addressed at me. And no, I don't think gunsmith classes are part of standard training for carrying a firearm, at least not in Texas.

  13. #12
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,387
    Nope, gunsmithing isn't part of the Texas Concealed Carry curriculum.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  14. #13
    Member Array SC Tiger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Seneca, SC
    Posts
    211
    Quote Originally Posted by adric22 View Post
    Yes, except I WAS the original poster on this topic, so the response was addressed at me. And no, I don't think gunsmith classes are part of standard training for carrying a firearm, at least not in Texas.
    It's not a required part of the SC class either. When I got my CCW it wasn't covered.

  15. #14
    Member Array SC Tiger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Seneca, SC
    Posts
    211
    Quote Originally Posted by Yankeejib View Post
    It's a lot easier to check out a used revolver than a semi. You can check lock up, alignment, timing, and the firing pin without shooting. With a semi, you're basically field stripping it to look for uncommon wear or anything funky.

    I always look at assembly screws. If knuckleheads have used improper tools to disassemble things, their work is suspect.
    I would also look for unusual "wear" in odd places.

    There are standard checks on 1911s and probably several other firearms but you probably want to research the actual gun you are looking at. They all have their little quirks.

  16. #15
    jyo
    jyo is offline
    Member Array jyo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    L.A.
    Posts
    313
    Yes, the pencil test!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

gun without firing pin
,
how can you tell if a gun works
,
how to know if a gun works
,

how to tell if a gun will fire

,

how to tell if a gun works

,
how to test a firing pin
,
how to test a gun
,
how to test fire a gun
,

how to test fire a rifle

,

how to test firing pin

,
test fire guns
,

test firing guns

Click on a term to search for related topics.