Anyone Like the 7X57?

This is a discussion on Anyone Like the 7X57? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Who else out there prefers classic cartridges and rifle performance? If it says "Magnum" on it then I'm not much interested if the bore diameter ...

Results 1 to 13 of 13
Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By bmcgilvray
  • 1 Post By 336A

Thread: Anyone Like the 7X57?

  1. #1
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,894

    Anyone Like the 7X57?

    Who else out there prefers classic cartridges and rifle performance?

    If it says "Magnum" on it then I'm not much interested if the bore diameter is under .30 but I perk up my ears for cartridges of "traditional" or "standard" configuration.

    And, while the grand ol' .30-06 is my very favorite rifle cartridge, I have a lot of affection for the 7X57. Took my bolt-action 7X57 out this morning to try out some batches of new handloads I made up a while back.



    This 7X57 rifle is one of the Interarms Mark X commercial 98 Mauser derivatives from out of Yugoslavia in the very early 1980s. I've had this rifle perhaps 30 years this year. I forget from time to time just how satisfying this rifle and cartridge really are. It's a consistent little performer, shooting most any handloading combination well. The cartridge is sure death to Texas whitetail deer when used with good expanding bullets. It'd probably do for elk with a stiff handload using the 154 grain Hornady Spire Point or other similar bullet.

    The bore has an unusually sparkling bright mirror finish to it's internal surfaces. The bore does clean up quickly and never has a problem with excessive copper fouling or it's removal. I'm old fashioned and like the fact that the rifle features a 24-inch barrel. I like weight, it gives heavy handloads a velocity shot in the arm and also slightly minimizes the perception of the report. I've got a dandy handload with that 154 grain Hornady Spire Point that makes 2784 fps with outstanding accuracy. Just think, .308 equivalent muzzle velocities with that bullet weight and really good down range performance.

    There are couple of things I don't care for about the Mark X rifle. One is the goofy sliding safety which is a completely unnecessary and foolish design. It's an easy matter to substitute a military 98 Mauser cocking piece with a Beuhler safety and this would be proper and more satisfying. Fits perfectly without modification and the sliding safety baggage can be tossed. A friend and I did this to his Mark X years ago but I haven't gotten around to giving my own rifle the treatment.

    The problem centers around an internal lever that connects the safety to the trigger and which rubs and interferes with the trigger pull that is otherwise pretty good. Tinkering can relieve the problem. I've bent on the lever (a formed piece of stiff wire), mostly freeing the trigger from rubbing, but noticed this morning that the trigger did feel like it briefly hung during a squeeze on one shot.

    The stock doesn't have much to recommend it for appearance but makes a perfectly suitable handle to hold on to the rifle. One could put the barreled action in any sort of fancy custom wood he desired and end up with a really good looking rifle. The blue finish is very nice, being deep and dark. Care was taken when the metal surfaces were polished so the finished effect is pleasing. These rifles represented good value in their day.



    The rifle is scoped with an even older Lyman All-American 6X scope featuring a fine crosshair with a 1 M.O.A. target dot. I got the scope used and didn't think much of this style reticle because the dot seemed to big but it has really worked with this rifle. This combination of rifle and scope has delivered the most consistent accuracy of any over-.22-bore-centerfire rifle I have.

    You can see were I didn't bother to wipe the rifle's RIG coat off before hieing to the range, figuring it was hot and the RIG might protect from sweat.

    This image is reduced by 14%, click it to view full size.

    First group fired from a cold, clean barrel. We were playing with H380 powder with all loads fired. Bullet used was a Remington 175 grain Core-Lokt round nose from the old '60s/early '70s red Remington component bullet boxes with the metal reinforced edges. Five shots made a 1 1/2-inch smiley group. I wonder if I'd kept firing if I could have had a perfect circle.


    Next up are three targets are shown in order as groups were fired and scope was tweaked a bit horizontally. I miscalculated the initial horizontal adjustment I made after shooting the 175 grain loads and went too far left.
    This image is reduced by 25%, click it to view full size.


    This image is reduced by 25%, click it to view full size.


    This image is reduced by 25%, click it to view full size.

    Last group found one round a bit out. I'd "ooched" the scope right another click, lightly tapping the adjustment screw afterward. The shot didn't feel quite right when it broke and was the third shot of the group so couldn't have been from the scope settling after adjustment.

    Only one other group was fired this morning and it was looking good until I decided to blow it out to 2 1/2-inches with one shot. It wasn't even on the occasion when the trigger hung either.

    Here's a bit more on the 7X57, posted a few years back
    Cartridge Discussion: The 7X57
    Last edited by bmcgilvray; July 30th, 2011 at 10:57 AM. Reason: Add link
    pistola likes this.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Moderator
    Array gasmitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    10,018
    I'm a big fan of the classic cartridges, but have not yet added them to the battery as yet (other than .30-30). 7x57 and the 6.5 Swede are on the list, and their priority will go up as my handloading prowess increases.

    Dang, you really post some great articles!
    Smitty
    NRA Endowment Member

  4. #3
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Yeah Smitty;

    I let a 6.5X55 get away from me that I was intending to sporterize. I want that round real bad for handloading and hunting fun.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  5. #4
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    ct
    Posts
    1,891
    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Yeah Smitty;

    I let a 6.5X55 get away from me that I was intending to sporterize. I want that round real bad for handloading and hunting fun.
    the M96 is a very fine shooter. like the K 31's they were kept in excellent condition--the metal if not always the wood.
    so if you come across a m96 with nice wood--please do not 'sporterize' it. rather to get a different stock altogether so it can be
    be made whole again. my eyes let it do 2" at 100 yards. my daughter can do a bit better. using 140 sierra and varget. with a scope i think it would be sub-moa
    good luck with your quest.

    BMC nice shooting & reporting. some times to get the best group takes a few (or more) trips to the range.
    a k1911 tried my patientce 12 times before i got it to 1 & 1/2" than my daughter took it...next she'll ask me to wax her car...
    Be aware, be deliberate in your actions and be accurate.
    -------------------
    Why do those elected to positions of power than work so hard
    to deny those same opportunities to the same people who empowered them

  6. #5
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Yeah Claude, you're right. I'm not too keen to sporterize most military rifles these days. The rifle I had was a 1905 dated Carl Gustav that had been imported in the early 1980s with the muzzle threaded for some later attachment. Gave a really ugly appearance. I didn't feel too badly about the notion of sporterizing the otherwise nice rifle. Strangely enough, it was very accurate as it came to me even though the muzzle's crown was an ugly and uneven thing. As it was, after being thrilled with the rifle's accuracy I ended up trading it away before I ever began the project in favor of some other gun I "couldn't live without" at the time. I don't now recall what it was.

    The 6.5X55 cartridge is great!
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  7. #6
    VIP Member
    Array atctimmy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NSA Headquarters
    Posts
    6,356
    I have a post WW2 Yugo M48 Mauser I bought about 8 years ago for $99. It was originally chambered in 8 X 57 and had been the victim of a sporterizing hack job. I redid the whole thing. New stock, new barrel and new trigger. I rechambered it to 7 X 57 too. It looks good and shoots great.

    I'm at work now but I'l post pics later.
    Mark Twain:
    The government is merely a servant -- merely a temporary servant; it cannot be its prerogative to determine what is right and what is wrong, and decide who is a
    patriot and who isn't. Its function is to obey orders, not originate them.

  8. #7
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    8,549
    What's not to like? What a great write up! I always enjoy your interesting and informational threads. This is a cartridge that anyone could make due with for just about any purpose. So many great classic cartridges and rifles that are ignored nowadays because of the supposedly latest and greatest.
    Ignorance is a long way from stupid, but left unchecked, can get there real fast.

  9. #8
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S. Florida, north of the Miami mess, south of the Mouse trap
    Posts
    15,721
    The 7x57 is an outstanding and terribly underated cartridge with mild recoil. Many other rounds have been based on it, and most of them good ones. Good for all medium game and larger with well-placed shots, it's a great addition to any collection. I passed up several great deals on one but just didn't "need" it as my 30-06 filled all my requirements. Should have picked one up. Maybe one day.
    Retired USAF E-8. Remember: You're being watched!
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  10. #9
    VIP Member
    Array msgt/ret's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    7,079
    I used to have a Ruger M77 in 7MM Mag but traded it off due to recoil. Later on a friend let me try his 7X57 at the range, much sweeter shooting and no pounding recoil like the 7MM Mag.
    When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk.
    "Don't forget, incoming fire has the right of way."

  11. #10
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S. Florida, north of the Miami mess, south of the Mouse trap
    Posts
    15,721
    Some big African hunter (Bell?) used to drop elephants with the 7x57. Wouldn't go that far in recommending it, but. . .
    Retired USAF E-8. Remember: You're being watched!
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  12. #11
    Member Array 336A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Conus
    Posts
    89
    Great looking rifle and shooting bmcgilvray. I'm a 7mm nut and would love to some day own my very own 7x57. IMHO it is avery well balanced catridge.
    atctimmy likes this.

  13. #12
    VIP Member
    Array atctimmy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NSA Headquarters
    Posts
    6,356
    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Some big African hunter (Bell?) used to drop elephants with the 7x57. Wouldn't go that far in recommending it, but. . .
    William Dalrymple Maitland Bell, also known as Karamojo Bell used the .275 Rigby (it is a rimmed* version of the 7X57). He used mainly large bore rifles but he experimented with smaller calibers, most notably the .275 Rigby. As a proffesional ivory hunter he killed THOUSANDS of elephants. He tested many rounds just for the sake of seeing how well they would perform.

    He found that when the bullet of a .275 Rigby was properly placed it killed an elephant just as quickly as a big bore express rifle (brain shots only). He also found that penetration into the skull and brain was nearly identical to the big bores. He did note that a poorly place shot from the small caliber was less effective than a poorly place big bore round. The larger round delivering more of a blow and thus stunning the elephant allowing for an easier follow up.

    Nobody knows how many elephants he killed and nobody knows how many he killed with the twin of the 7x57, the .275 Rigby. The lesson here is, as always, bullet placement trumps caliber.

    * There is some debate on the actual specs of the .275 Rigby case.
    Last edited by atctimmy; August 1st, 2011 at 12:45 AM. Reason: spelling
    Mark Twain:
    The government is merely a servant -- merely a temporary servant; it cannot be its prerogative to determine what is right and what is wrong, and decide who is a
    patriot and who isn't. Its function is to obey orders, not originate them.

  14. #13
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    "He did note that a poorly place shot from the small caliber was less effective than a poorly place big bore round."

    Funny how that works. It's not politically correct to assert that line of reasoning when discussing handgun cartridges suitable for self defense, hah!
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

7x57
,

7x57 accuracy

,
7x57 handloads
,

7x57 mauser accuracy

,
7x57 mauser rifle accuracy
,
7x57 mauser vs 30-06
,
7x57 rifle
,
handloading 7x57
,

interarms 7x57

,
interarms 7x57 mauser
,
interarms mark x 7mm mauser
,

interarms mark x 7x57

Click on a term to search for related topics.