Twitching muscle in my arm.

This is a discussion on Twitching muscle in my arm. within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I've had this problem the last 4 or 5 times I've gone to the range. I went again today and had the same problem. Basically ...

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Thread: Twitching muscle in my arm.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Twitching muscle in my arm.

    I've had this problem the last 4 or 5 times I've gone to the range. I went again today and had the same problem. Basically I'm perfectly fine until I've shot off about 25 rounds or so. At that point a muscle in my forearm will start twitching or spasming and it will cause my hand (and gun) to shake really bad from left-to-right. It will go away the moment I let go of the gun or if I point the gun down low. But as soon as I hold the gun up to shoot the target, it starts in again. You'd think I had parkinson's disease from the way it looks. So I'll typically switch to shooting with my left hand, and everything is fine. It is only my right arm that is doing this. Funny thing is, I can't even reproduce the problem outside of the gun range. I can hold my gun at home and point it in the exact same manner, and it doesn't seem to happen. I asked the range master today if he had heard of such a thing and he had not. So I'm kind of stumped. I suspect it is a nerve problem since it only happens when holding my arm in a specific way.

    From a self-defense perspective it doesn't seem to be much of an issue as it doesn't start until I've fired off at least 25 rounds. But it sure does take the joy out of going to the range. As you can imagine, my accuracy drops dramatically after that problem kicks in. I suppose in time I may learn to shoot as well with my left hand, but I sure can't right now.

    Anyone ever experienced this or heard of it before?
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

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  3. #2
    Distinguished Member Array INccwchris's Avatar
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    Don't hold your arm that way, it won't do it then
    "The value you put on the lost will be determined by the sacrifice you are willing to make to seek them until they are found."

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    If you grip too tight that can cause the shakes. Are you shooting one or two hands?
    "I got a lot of problems with you people!" - Frank Costanza

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    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    I'm sorry to hear of your difficulty.

    I'm not a doctor so please take anything I say with a grain of salt. To me, it sounds like muscle fatigue. You're probably over working a muscle with a motor activity that it hasn't had a chance to become accustomed to yet. You might lay off a little to see if it improves. You may also maybe try some light exercises to build strength. If you have some hand grips, try working them every other day and see if that helps.

    At first, I'd probably lay off completely and not do anything for a day or two and see what happens. If it continues in spite of your efforts, it might be time to see a physical therapist. As scary as that sounds, sometimes they can give you the simplest exercises that will help you with your problems. At the time they might even be exercises that seem silly to you.

    Please keep us updated and let us know about your progression.

    Take care,

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    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fastk9dad View Post
    If you grip too tight that can cause the shakes. Are you shooting one or two hands?
    I shoot with two hands. I don't actually hold my gun very tightly, that tends to hurt my accuracy. Oddly enough, when I switch to my left hand to shoot, I am still supporting it with my right hand, but it doesn't shake when playing a supporting role, only when actually holding the gun. I'm only 36 years old, and I've been shooting pistols since I was 18. I can't imagine its old age setting in.

    At first, I'd probably lay off completely and not do anything for a day or two and see what happens. If it continues in spite of your efforts, it might be time to see a physical therapist.
    Defcongun, I appreciate the suggestion, but I'm not sure you fully understood the issue. This pretty much never happens except at the range, which I only go about once every 3 weeks or so. I've thought about asking my doctor about it next time I go in, but I can see the look on his face already when I try to explain exactly when this problem occurs.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

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    JD
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    Quote Originally Posted by INccwchris View Post
    Don't hold your arm that way, it won't do it then

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    VIP Member Array Paco's Avatar
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    In all seriousness, it might be the way you are holding your arm. I have noticed that sometimes if I am holding my arm or legs in a certain way I'll get a twitch that just feels odd. As soon as I move it is gone. I realize that you say it only happens when you are at the range, maybe your issue has to do with the range of motion required for shooting.

    Try to do other things how you shoot, for a little while, and see if it still happens. For example, change the channel on your TV for a few days as if you were shooting. I know it sounds odd, but as an IT guy if I want to find an issue I try to recreate it whenever I can.

    The fun part is if you can recreate it, finding out why it does that. I say ask your Doc, I'm sure asking about going to the range won't freak him out.
    "Don't hit a man if you can possibly avoid it; but if you do hit him, put him to sleep." - Theodore Roosevelt

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    Quote Originally Posted by adric22 View Post
    I've thought about asking my doctor about it next time I go in, but I can see the look on his face already when I try to explain exactly when this problem occurs.
    I'm sure doctor's have heard of worse conditions. My eye doctor didn't even flinch when I told her I wanted prescription shooting glasses.. in fact she recommended a great shooting kit I have been very happy with. Shooting is a sport as well and if your doctor has a problem with that then.. well, I would tell him he could kiss my elbow.

    I would also recommend seeing if you can duplicate the problem by holding a heavier weight in the same manner with which you grip your gun. At least holding a heavier weight like you hold your gun will build up your muscle endurance for holding your gun in general even if it doesn't help you duplicate the problem.

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    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    A lot has been posted lately about doctors & guns, but IMO, if you can't discuss this with your doctor, you are going to the wrong doctor.

    I had this problem after a long layoff from practicing (a few years), and I used the squeeze type handgrips in order to build up wrist and hand strength. This seemed to help considerably. Good luck with your issue.
    "If you make something idiot proof, someone will make a better idiot."

    - Anon

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    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    Gotcha. I was thinking the frequency you were hitting the range was greater than every 3 weeks or so. I thought you might have been zealously practicing and perhaps was hitting the range every few days.

    I agree with everyone else's suggestion; try to duplicate the problem and go from there. If you can replicate it then try different grips and angles to see if you can alleviate the problem.

    Also, if you go to your doctor and ask him/her about it; ask him/her if its possible if you could have tendonitis.

    Hope this helps,

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    An exercise that will help you is to tie a ten pound weight to a 1" dowel rod about two feet long (cut broom handle, whatever). Make the string about 5 feet long and tie the weight on one end and the string in the middle of the dowel. Hold the stick with both arms straight out and wind the weight all the way up and all the way back down. Do this a couple times a day and you will be good to go.
    Two roads diverged in a wood, and Ió
    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.

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    Member Array markush's Avatar
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    I have exactly the same problem. I can sit and dry fire till I'm blue in the face and never get the twitch. Last year I was hitting the range once a week for about 4 months and the round count until the twitch came slowly climbed during that time but would always appear. I haven't been able to make it to the range more then a few times this year and during those few times the round count before the twitch has been quite low. It has to be muscle fatigue but I have no idea how to address the problem or what exercises would help...dry fire practice hasn't seemed to help me.

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    JD
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    Quote Originally Posted by markush View Post
    I have exactly the same problem. I can sit and dry fire till I'm blue in the face and never get the twitch. Last year I was hitting the range once a week for about 4 months and the round count until the twitch came slowly climbed during that time but would always appear. I haven't been able to make it to the range more then a few times this year and during those few times the round count before the twitch has been quite low. It has to be muscle fatigue but I have no idea how to address the problem or what exercises would help...dry fire practice hasn't seemed to help me.
    Google wrist curls and take a look at these: Grip Master

  15. #14
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    I'm thinking its muscle fatigue also because I've had the muscles in my arms twitch when I was doing nothing but watching T.V. I use my arms alot so it stands to reason why they would have fatigue sometimes. My arms don't flinch in the same fashion in how you describe your hands shake but the muscles themselves twitch in such a fashion that I can look down and see them involuntarily flexing, etc.

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