Why do you count the rounds fired?

Why do you count the rounds fired?

This is a discussion on Why do you count the rounds fired? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Seems like everyone knows with great precision how many rounds have been fired in their various guns. Why is that an important statistic to keep ...

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Thread: Why do you count the rounds fired?

  1. #1
    Member Array jdf3834's Avatar
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    Question Why do you count the rounds fired?

    Seems like everyone knows with great precision how many rounds have been fired in their various guns.

    Why is that an important statistic to keep track of?

    How do you keep count (spreadsheet? / marks on the wall? / notepad? / keep box tops? / other?).


  2. #2
    Distinguished Member Array phreddy's Avatar
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    Semi-autos recommend that you change the springs at certain intervals. If you count you have a better chance of changing at the recomended time and not have to deal with failures.

  3. #3
    Member Array ChrisMia's Avatar
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    A few reasons for me:

    1. Before fully trusting a pistol for HD/SD, my test is 200 rds of FMJ and 150 rds of carry HPs without failures. I've obviously gotta monitor how the test is going.

    2. As mentioned above, preventive maintenance in terms of spring replacements, etc.

    3. I like to know how much practice I get into each range session.

    4. I just like to be meticulous with my stuff.

  4. #4
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    Most boxes of ammo come in counts of 50 or 100 rds. It's easy to keep track of your round count if you remember how many boxes you put through a gun at the range, etc. If you want to write it down in a notebook you can.. some people do keep spreadsheets. For some more high-end firearms some people like to keep specific count so if they try to sell them it gives the potential buyer an estimate of how much exactly it has been used.

    And, yes, some springs have a certain "round count life" where you are recommended changing them out.

    As mentioned, if you try to sell the gun a serious buyer will often ask how many rounds have gone through it to assess how used it is.

    It also helps to tell you how the firearm is holding up in general. If you don't know how many rounds you've put through it and you start having problems you might not have an accurate gauge of "well, it's been 200 rounds and started having problems" or "so many rounds between problems," etc. It may help with "diagnostics."

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    I just rely on my trusty Gen 3 Glocks,don't worry about the counting,to much else going on for that.
    jem102 likes this.

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    I'm not a counter. I probably know within a couple hundred rounds how many each guns has, but I don't sweat it.
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  7. #7
    Member Array edlex's Avatar
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    I do it to know when to do a complete disassembly cleaning versus a field strip cleaning as well as all the reasons cited above.

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    I reload,I have no idea how many rounds I put thru each gun,the only guns I really worry about are my carry guns,they get cleaned and lubed and recoil springs changed to keep them running.
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
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  9. #9
    Member Array Shaughn's Avatar
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    I use a log book, because it allows me to track trends and maintenance and if you get to staggering the mind round counts, you take more time inspecting the frame at points where it is known or likely that cracks or stresses can develop.

    Nothing more frustrating and potentially expensive as have a firearms accuracy or reliability fall off and not know what it has performed like in the past, is it bedding, barrel, sights, something loose, a frame crack, magazine that was damaged, a change in the ammunition or something like the manufacturer changing the bullet profile slightly or if it is the shooter.

    With no history, you have to start from bare bones and could waste an entire day locating a problem, that after perusing a carefully kept log book, may be found and dealt with after an hour.

    It is also nice if you reload for said rifle/pistol/revolver and haven't done anything with it for some time, grab the log book and look up what worked before and see if you have any of that particular load on hand or should you need to develop a new load, referencing a current manual, see if they have something that emulates the original loading that worked so well before.

    Like others posted, if selling it a buyer may like to know how many rounds have been fired, is it on the 1 st barrel or the 3 rd, when was it last checked by a smith, has the bedding been redone etc.

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    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    Most of mine I kept an exact count up to 200 rounds before I would carry it (just to ensure reliability) and I know approximations of how many boxes I've put through them. One in particular I have kept an exact count because I read mixed reviews and just thought it would be interesting to keep up with it. That's my Taurus PT709, which has 1,800 rounds through it with no issues at all. Some of my heavy range use guns I shoot a lot and rarely carry (and bought used) I don't keep any count.
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  11. #11
    VIP Member Array chiefjason's Avatar
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    Put me squarely into the "could care less" category.
    I prefer to live dangerously free than safely caged!

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    Senior Member Array IAm_Not_Lost's Avatar
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    I think it depends on how much you shoot, and if you reload exc. For me, like Limatunes said, it's easy to keep track of rounds because I have a decent memory and I buy ammo boxes of 50 or 100. It's simply hard for me NOT to keep a running total in my head without really thinking about it.
    "Brilliant. So now we got a huge guy theory, and a serial crusher theory. Top notch. What's your name?" - Paul Smecker

  13. #13
    Member Array MarkR's Avatar
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    I like to keep track of type and number of rounds for reliability and maintenance purposes. I currently just use a notebook.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array Bob O's Avatar
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    I keep a notebook in my range bag and fill in the round count and date before I leave the range.

    Bobo
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  15. #15
    Distinguished Member Array ripley16's Avatar
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    I keep a range log that shows round counts and other info I like to record. This data is put on a spreadsheet. Round count is used mainly for spring replacement, but also just to know for the heck of it.

    If you sell a gun, the first question a potential buyer will ask is "how many round?"

    I keep records of my car too. Seems better to know these things than not.

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