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is reloading cheaper

This is a discussion on is reloading cheaper within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; When calculating true cost, many forget to factor in the value of their time. Generally, what you get paid an hour for employment is what ...

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  1. #16
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    When calculating true cost, many forget to factor in the value of their time. Generally, what you get paid an hour for employment is what your time is worth.

    But if you enjoy it, quantification goes out the window.
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  2. #17
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    Over the long haul it is worth it. It really depends on how much you shoot and what calibers. If it's just 9mm then probably not. If it's 300 Winchester Mag then it certainly is.
    It is surely true that you can lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink. Nor can you make them grateful for your efforts.

  3. #18
    Member Array gigamortis's Avatar
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    If you do get a progressive press, make sure it is one that is self indexing. This feature will cut down on the chances of double charging.

  4. #19
    VIP Member Array Guns and more's Avatar
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    It may be cheaper AFTER your reloading tools are paid for.
    Then, it's cheaper if your time is worthless.
    But, if you enjoy it, then I say go.
    If you're doing it to save money, no.
    I hear people saying, "I can reload 200 rounds in an hour."
    Really? Tumbling brass, trimming cases, sizing, buying supplies, re-loading?

  5. #20
    Senior Member Array Ring's Avatar
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    it is if you shoot allot... if you only shoot a few a few 100 a year, it will take a long time to pay off...

  6. #21
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    It'll take you a while to load enough ammo to make back the investment in loading equipment, but probably not more than a year.

    Once you've done that, wither you will save money...or you will shoot more for the same money. It shouldn't really cost you more in the long run. It certainly will save you money per round fired in the long run.

    My personal situation was this—I dropped a lot up front for a Dillon RL-550B with a ton of accessories. It ran me about $1100 in start-up costs. I shoot a lot of .45ACP in competition (and so does my g/f); I reload .45ACP for around fifteen cents a round (give or take component prices at the time), and the best bulk ammo I could find commercially (Georgia Arms) is about thirty-five cents a round. It took me 5,500 rounds to make back the original investment, which was less than a year. I am now up to about 15k rounds in about two years of reloading, so, yeah, I am pretty sure I am saving money.

    On the flip side, you could start with a much cheaper setup that will only run you a few hundred dollars to start, and you will pay it off much more quickly and be saving money.
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  7. #22
    Senior Member Array mr surveyor's Avatar
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    I decided to tinker with a bit of realoading early this year, and like everything else I've ever done I wanted to start out with the bare-bones basics in equipment and technique so that I would understand the idiosyncracies (finally got to use that word in a sentence ) of the total exercise. My intention was to work with .45 acp and .357 mag, since they were the most expensive commercial ammunition I use in handguns, but from a "what do I shoot the most" realization I opted for 9mm and .357 mag. So, keeping with my "start with the basics" attitude, I bought the Lee Classic Loaders for the 9mm and .357 mag, as well as a balance scale, micrometer, flaring tool, chamfer tool, and several other assorted tools (about $150 total) and started learning from the ground up. After several months of fooling with the tapered cases of the 9mm and the hand hammered process involved with the Lee Classic Loader I decided to set it aside until I find the space needed to set up a real bench. I just couldn't find a good technique for working with the 9mm with the given tools. But, the straight walled cases of the .357 have been a real joy to work with. No doubt I have already saved money on range fodder by hammering out my own in the last 9-10 months. No doubt I will get a "big boy press" someday, but for now my intention is to study every single part of the process in detail with every round I finish. Besides, all the hammering keeps mrs. surveyor at her end of the house

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  8. #23
    Member Array glock42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack76590 View Post
    I note the OP lives in Paris, France. So US cost comparisons of factory vs. reloaded ammunition may not apply to him.
    i dont live in paris i just put for the fun of it i live in nc

  9. #24
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    thanks for all the info guys

  10. #25
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    If you only shoot a few hundred rounds a month I would suggest you get something like the lee anniversary kit,you can do several hundred cases during each step and load enough to make up the cost fairly quick,later on if you want to upgrade you will still have your single stage in case you are loading for accuracy etc.
    If you belong to a gun club/range you may find some other guys to go in on a bulk primer powder buy to save some money on hazmat and shipping fees.If you have to pay a 25.00 hazmat fee on primers or powder unless you order 3 or 4 8# jugs or 20,000 primers your not gonna get them cheap enough to offset buying them locally IOW if I can get primers online at 16.00 1000,or pay 30.00 1000 locally,and buying powder online at around $12.00 a pound or $20.00+ locally then I gotta be able to justify eating up the $25.00 to $50.00 shipping/hazmat fee.
    The only way to get around the cost of equipment and supplies is to have a friend locally like me that will sell you ammo for a couple dollars over my cost.
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  11. #26
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    Check out Kempf Gun Shop (online) -- they've bundled some nice goodies with the Lee Classic Turret Press Kit.

    My cost to reload a box of 9mm is about $6. I calculated it will pay for itself in about 60 boxes (three months of shooting for me). After that, I save $7-8 per box + will own the equipment for a lifetime.

  12. #27
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    Short answer no, long answer yes...

    First the no... $$$ outlay for dies, powder, primers, brass if you do not have any, bullets, brass polisher, media for same reloading press, powder dump, scales, dedicate an area for you stuff, buy the books for the reloading data, it all adds up...

    Now for the yes, the quiet time, ability to customize your rounds, and the lower per round cost eventually catch up and yes in the end if you shoot a lot you will save money...
    "The sword dose not cause the murder, and the maker of the sword dose not bear sin" Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac 11th century

  13. #28
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    I've been reloading since about 1995. The cost hasn't gone up, percetage wise, as it has for factory loaded ammo. Over the long haul it will save you money.

    I don't use picked up brass at the range....I want to know how many RL are on each batch. I also do not tumble and trim my brass each time. I do check the length as well as over all length after loading. I don't shoot competively anymore so getting the brass to .001 of an inch isn't a big concern for me.

    I am also retires so a few hours in my garage on a single stage press to RL is not wasted time for me.

  14. #29
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    One of the major factors that is being overlooked as a benefit of reloading...

    availability.

    When Ammo went zipping off the shelves due to various circumstances, us reloaders that had sizable stashes of brass,powder,primers,bullets and powder suffered no ill effects.

    We we relatively unaffected by cost increases due to supply and demand.

    No one that considers seriously preparing for the future should overlook reloading capability. When the SHTF, it might could be the difference. If nothing else, it will be valuable as barter.

    In the mean time, it can be therapeutic to reload while listening to classic rock.
    kwoodford and marcclarke like this.
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  15. #30
    tts
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    I found that my investment in reloading equipment for 9MM (about $550 out-the-door) will be recouped in about 59 boxes of shooting with the savings over factory ammo.

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