What Gun to Use for a Story? - Page 4

What Gun to Use for a Story?

This is a discussion on What Gun to Use for a Story? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Yes, Crossman. You can use irony with the word: Cross man - it could actually be approached in two ways: Is he a cross (angry) ...

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Thread: What Gun to Use for a Story?

  1. #46
    Member Array lazytl's Avatar
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    Yes, Crossman. You can use irony with the word: Cross man - it could actually be approached in two ways: Is he a cross (angry) man or does he have messianic (The Cross) fantasies. If the good guy uses the same weapon then we are suggesting dualistic symbolism.


  2. #47
    Member Array BadgerMan's Avatar
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    I like the idea of the Luger, perhaps one carried by someone in the SS? I know the P38 would be more common but I think that more people would recognize the Luger. Along the same lines you could also go with the Walther PP that Hitler committed suicide with, I think the Russians actually have that but maybe someobody steals it to sell it and gets struck by the curse/possession. The problem with those is that it wouldn't make much sense to have the good guy carrying either one in modern times. The Model 29 idea is cool too, most people won't recognize the model number but I bet a lot of people will be familiar with the .44 Magnum, especially if you throw some Harry Callahan style lines in your story.

  3. #48
    Senior Member Array wdbailey's Avatar
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    Honestly, given that such renowned novelist as Robert Ludlum will make reference to "flicking the safety off on the Glock" and saying that the
    "Browning" is the standard issue for US police forces I'd thing that rather than worry about instant recognition by the general public that you just "bite the bullet" and go with something that the gun savvy will recognize and perhaps be offended by

  4. #49
    Member Array steelhawk's Avatar
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    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll give them some thought.

  5. #50
    Member Array lazytl's Avatar
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    Often the ideas we get in high school or college seem inspired but upon further inspection we recognize them as being shallow or juvenile. I'm not saying that's your case as I haven't seen the manuscript, but I do think when the subject has spiritual implications such as possession -- whether you believe in it as a reality or not -- or deep social and political implications, such as handguns, you have deeper questions to ask than what type of handgun to use, and perhaps you are asking yourself those questions. I am new to this forum, but having read posts here the past few weeks it's not hard to recognize the posters who had a lifetime of experience with weapons. These individuals, male and female, are usually past or present LEOs, military members, or have had considerable range training. I don't put myself in their class though I was in the military and have been shooting since I was about six. But, I do have over 40 years experience in writing, editing, and publishing. Only one or two people have suggested a warning about a story that involves a weapon being possessed and I'm surprised there weren't more. I wrote for a gun magazine for eight years. Not being a gun expert, I dealt primarily with the aesthetics and intrinsic values of hunting and social and political issues. In that regard, I know that many "antis" believe that all handguns are possessed. They won't come right and say so, of course, but they get "evil vibes" simply looking at a handgun. One woman, a former editor of mine, told me she gets almost physically ill simply looking at a handgun. Realizing this political environment, I would suggest a story where one only believes a handgun is possessed, but in the end, the responsibility for its mayhem is completely human. I think this would not only be a better approach politically but would add depth and power to the story. The best stories involve empathy: human struggle and conquest; human interaction with life and environment. Good stories also go against the grain and are not predictable. Hence, a story where a gun is supposedly "possessed," which, in the story, feeds fear, bigotry and overreaction from society, but has the moral theme of of personal responsibility has the gravitas and pathos of being publishable and marketable. Though, certainly many of the liberal elements would rather see a story about a possessed handgun. I don't mean this to throw cold water on the idea of nominating all the various firearms we love to hate. There are certainly as many as there are individual tastes.
    JDE101 and wdbailey like this.

  6. #51
    Member Array steelhawk's Avatar
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    lazytl, I sent you a pm.

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    VIP Member Array TWO GUNS's Avatar
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    A Star PD.
    Have Fun and Shoot Straight !!

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