Any problems dry firing revolvers?

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Thread: Any problems dry firing revolvers?

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    Member Array NYMike's Avatar
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    Any problems dry firing revolvers?

    Don't own any but at Cabelas in was looking at the Ruger LCR which by all accounts has an awesome trigger based on cams and little or no stacking. Well imwanted to feel the smooth trigger pull and got yelled at like I was a novice. Was told you don't drop a hammer on an empty chamber. Any validity or is this just another gun store know it all who is misinformed dearly?

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    Senior Member Array Dadsnugun's Avatar
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    I was brought up with the no dry fire rule and it has been a part of my life for so long, I automatically adhere to it. Don't know if technology has eliminated the need or not.
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    My understanding is that unless it is a rimfire weapon, modern firearms can be dry fired without a problem.
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    Member Array rainmaker's Avatar
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    Most, if not all, modern revolvers can be dry fired with no problem, and state so in the operating instructions. However, any firing (dry or live) tends to "ring" the cylinder. A dealer wouldn't want a brand new revolver to show any use - hence the "no dry firing" policy.
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    VIP Member Array JoJoGunn's Avatar
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    Some retailers frown on it and some don't.

    I looked at the Ruger LCR quite a lot before buying one for my wife. All the sales people allowed me to dry fire it as well as my wife, nobody discouraged me or said that we could not.

    Actually the guy behind the counter demonstrated the great trigger pull of the LCR long before I got hold of it. Don't believe that the occasional dry fire will harm a modern revolver but excessive firing may cause problems.

    I think the retailer just wanted you to buy it and not at least get the feel for the thing.
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    Member Array old guy 2's Avatar
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    I dri fire stuff constantly, even rimfires, I did have a pin break on a Charter arms bulldog once rite after I bought it, I have two Ruger 10-22s and a mark 1 or standard that I dri fire hundreds of times, it is easy to see that the pin does not hit the chamber.
    I have dri fired revolvers for 50 years and only broke on fireing pin.

    John

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    You don't want to dry fire a rim fire or a direct firing pin revolver, but most newer revolvers use some sort of a transfer bar, so dry firing isn't going to damage the gun.
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    Regardless of the type of gun, this is more of an etiquette thing. It's best to ask first.

    When I'm handling someone else's iron, I'll ask before doing anything; "Mind if I open the cylinder?" "Mind if I lock back the slide?". 'Simple words that show respect and avoid misunderstandings.
    mano3, chefjon, rdpG19 and 1 others like this.
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    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoJoGunn View Post
    Some retailers frown on it and some don't.

    I looked at the Ruger LCR quite a lot before buying one for my wife. All the sales people allowed me to dry fire it as well as my wife, nobody discouraged me or said that we could not.

    Actually the guy behind the counter demonstrated the great trigger pull of the LCR long before I got hold of it. Don't believe that the occasional dry fire will harm a modern revolver but excessive firing may cause problems.

    I think the retailer just wanted you to buy it and not at least get the feel for the thing.
    The Ruger manual states that dry firing is OK..

    also right from Ruger's website:

    Ruger Frequently Asked Questions

    Can I dry fire my Ruger revolver?
    Yes. All Ruger revolvers can be dry fired without damage, and dry firing can be useful to familiarize the owner with the firearm. However, be sure any firearm is completely unloaded before dry firing!
    That being said, I buy snap caps for all my weapons.... they are cheap.

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    Member Array swmft's Avatar
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    It is the same with all guns it is about the quality of the steal in the pin and fit and finish. With a new gun I can see them not wanting them marked,

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    Member Array rogertc1's Avatar
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    Id question plastic guns like the LCR Buy a Smith.

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    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogertc1 View Post
    Id question plastic guns like the LCR Buy a Smith.
    Have you owned one? What is your experience with them? It is no secret that Ruger makes solid tough revolvers... the 2500 on mine re-affirms that for me. I'd question anyone that hasn't owned what they question and have first hand experience with it.
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    Member Array Fan45acp's Avatar
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    If it hurts Rugers to be dry - fired, then all my Rugers are junk...NOT!!! I dry - fire the thunder out of my Rugers. ALL of em..

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    Member Array jasgo's Avatar
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    I don't see a problem dry firing a quality built centerfire revolver (rimfires can eventually get a ding on the chamber rim and the firing pin get peened). Besides, if it can't hold up to dry firing, then how can you trust it in actual firing. For extensive dry firing, use snap-caps as previously mentioned.

    Maybe the store has a policy of no dry firing to prevent any accidents as a liability thing. Or the people behind the counter aren't true gun experts/shooters/hobbyists. I wouldn't buy from a store that won't let me feel how good the trigger is. It can vary slightly between two different guns of the same model too (i.e. crispness, weight of pull). Almost like a car dealership that won't let you test drive a car you are considering to buy. Take your business elsewhere.

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    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
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    To make things clearer to those that really don't know, the LCR has a ss cylinder, aluminum frame on the .38 model and ss on the 357 model and the only "polymer" is in the FCG housing which mounts to the frame and includes the grip and is made of glass fiber. It is an excellent and innovative design. I do not like to get stuck in old ways, I embrace change..... it is a great revolver.
    JoJoGunn likes this.

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