Good Trade or Not? SW.38 for a Keltec PF9

This is a discussion on Good Trade or Not? SW.38 for a Keltec PF9 within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Someone sent me a picture of a SW 38 and looking to Identify it and it worth? To me it looks like a older sevice ...

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Thread: Good Trade or Not? SW.38 for a Keltec PF9

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array sid1's Avatar
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    Good Trade or Not? SW.38 for a Keltec PF9

    Someone sent me a picture of a SW 38 and looking to Identify it and it worth?
    To me it looks like a older sevice revolver. He wants to trade me for a new Keltec PF9

    Thanks in advance


    IMAG0181


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    2012-04-01_05-22-39_961

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  3. #2
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    Make the trade...now, before he gets away.
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    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
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    I would trade in a heartbeat.

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    Distinguished Member Array sid1's Avatar
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    Just from the Picture can anyone tell the model?

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    VIP Member Array wmhawth's Avatar
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    A Keltec PF9 won't be hard to replace if you miss it. There's no decision to be made here in my opinion.

  7. #6
    Distinguished Member Array sid1's Avatar
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    I am in total agreement with everyones reply. But more importantly looking for someones expertise on this gun and maybe from the picture a date or model on this firearm.
    I know I dont have any more info one this but want to ask everyone on here until I go meet this guy

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    It appears to be the M&P Model 10. After WWII I believe they were marketed as the Victory Model Smith and Wesson .38 Caliber Revolver. I'm sure glockman can give you more info on the gun.
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    Distinguished Member Array sid1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by archer51 View Post
    It appears to be the M&P Model 10. After WWII I believe they were marketed as the Victory Model Smith and Wesson .38 Caliber Revolver. I'm sure glockman can give you more info on the gun.
    Thanks, I am quessing that time period too, on the lines of the britsh snub nose weather if that thats the Victory model I havent a clue. It does look like it has a faint crown marking in the picture.

  10. #9
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    If it is a Victory model, the serial number should start with a V or VS. it should be marked on the butt of the gun, near the lanyard ring.

    Interesting video on the Victory model.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NuN1M6wdZ3Q
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    VIP Member Array Thunder71's Avatar
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    I'd keep the PF9 and just buy it outright.

    Neat, this is post 1234.

  12. #11
    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
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    Check for cracks around the forcing cone. Check lockup on all cylinders. Make the trade with gusto. Enjoy a fine carry piece. I am jealous. This is a great opportunity for you.

  13. #12
    Distinguished Member Array sid1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by azchevy View Post
    Check for cracks around the forcing cone. Check lockup on all cylinders. Make the trade with gusto. Enjoy a fine carry piece. I am jealous. This is a great opportunity for you.
    azchevy, Will do and Thanks for the great tips. I am definitely not a J-frame guy.

  14. #13
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    Not so fast.

    That's a cut-down Smith & Wesson Victory Model by all appearances. Looks to have additional acceptance stamps, likely British, on the frame but due to the injudicious use of the polishing wheel it is hard to tell in the photo. A peek at the serial number on the butt would tell the tale if it is a Victory Model. The serial number will have a "V", "VS", (some say only a few were marked "SV") prefix. If the serial number has no letter prefix at all then it is of pre-war manufacture. If it is a British contract gun then it will have originally been chambered for .38 S&W. Many of the .38 S&W Victory revolvers were reamed out to take .38 Special. Some fret over this but I knew of a lawman who carried a 4-inch conversion .38 Special conversion of a .38 S&W Victory for many years. He only shot Winchester +P 110 grain JGP through it for everything: practice, duty, plinking. It held up fine. Just extracted a .38 Special case with a "step" in the middle.

    Stop and consider this. The revolver is missing the front lug. The ejector rod is just hanging out into space. It is nominally safe to shoot in such a manner but really needs the front locking lug that secures the ejector rod. Colt revolvers don't lock "out front" like Smith & Wesson revolvers but their design is different. The original Smith & Wesson K-Frame as originated in 1899 also didn't have a front locking lug but at its very first design revision Smith & Wesson saw fit to add the front locking point for added strength and serviceability.

    This gun is a indifferently refinished mongrel. It began life as a 4-inch or longer barreled revolver. When the barrel was cut back it was shortened so much the locking lug was lost. Either it has been fitted with a 2-inch M&P ejector rod or the original ejector rod has been shortened. Sort of looks like the later in the photo.

    Unless one is interested in owning a curiosity on the order of the exact same type as Lee Harvey Oswald used to murder officer J. D. Tibbets right after the Kennedy assassination in November of 1963, the revolver is mostly worth the sum of its usable parts. The Victory Models were frequently sold through mail order in the early 1960s. Some firms would re-import them, rechamber them and cut back the barrels to make inexpensive .38 Special snubs.

    It isn't worth the trade.

    For comparison purposes, here is a proper early 1950s commercial Smith & Wesson Military & Police 2-inch .38 Special revolver.



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    VIP Member Array wmhawth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Not so fast.

    That's a cut-down Smith & Wesson Victory Model by all appearances. Looks to have additional acceptance stamps, likely British, on the frame but due to the injudicious use of the polishing wheel it is hard to tell in the photo. A peek at the serial number on the butt would tell the tale if it is a Victory Model. The serial number will have a "V", "VS", (some say only a few were marked "SV") prefix. If the serial number has no letter prefix at all then it is of pre-war manufacture. If it is a British contract gun then it will have originally been chambered for .38 S&W. Many of the .38 S&W Victory revolvers were reamed out to take .38 Special. Some fret over this but I knew of a lawman who carried a 4-inch conversion .38 Special conversion of a .38 S&W Victory for many years. He only shot Winchester +P 110 grain JGP through it for everything: practice, duty, plinking. It held up fine. Just extracted a .38 Special case with a "step" in the middle.

    Stop and consider this. The revolver is missing the front lug. The ejector rod is just hanging out into space. It is nominally safe to shoot in such a manner but really needs the front locking lug that secures the ejector rod. Colt revolvers don't lock "out front" like Smith & Wesson revolvers but their design is different. The original Smith & Wesson K-Frame as originated in 1899 also didn't have a front locking lug but at its very first design revision Smith & Wesson saw fit to add the front locking point for added strength and serviceability.

    This gun is a indifferently refinished mongrel. It began life as a 4-inch or longer barreled revolver. When the barrel was cut back it was shortened so much the locking lug was lost. Either it has been fitted with a 2-inch M&P ejector rod or the original ejector rod has been shortened. Sort of looks like the later in the photo.

    Unless one is interested in owning a curiosity on the order of the exact same type as Lee Harvey Oswald used to murderofficer J. D. Tibbets after the Kennedy assassination in November of 1963, the revolver is mostly worth the sum of its usable parts. The Victory Models were frequently sold through mail order in the early 1960s. Some firms would re-import them, rechamber them and cut back the barrels to make inexpensive .38 Special snubs.

    It isn't worth the trade.

    ]
    Good points. You maybe saved us some money. Blinded by my lust I'd have probably bought the darned thing.

  16. #15
    Distinguished Member Array sid1's Avatar
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    I knew this forum was the place to for the answers. bmcgilvray great detecive work, If I lived closer I would buy you a beer.
    I passed. Instead I went out a bought a Kahr CW. Thanks guys

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