hog hunting/defense experiences with 7.62x39R & 10mm

hog hunting/defense experiences with 7.62x39R & 10mm

This is a discussion on hog hunting/defense experiences with 7.62x39R & 10mm within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I plan on hog hunting with a SKS and just ordered tech sights TS200 peep sights for it since the stock ones are to far ...

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Thread: hog hunting/defense experiences with 7.62x39R & 10mm

  1. #1
    Member Array GregDepot's Avatar
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    hog hunting/defense experiences with 7.62x39R & 10mm

    I plan on hog hunting with a SKS and just ordered tech sights TS200 peep sights for it since the stock ones are to far forward for my eyes. I plan on using 123gr stellier & Bellot SP ammo (for quality) but I could use russian 154gr SP ammo instead if that would be better. I dont really want to spend $30 + shipping on corbon etc 154gr etc. I bought the Glock 20 for defense and 200gr underwood TMJ ammo for it.

    My friend is using a scoped SKS with a CW45 as back up and since hes cheaper than me he probaly will use the best ammo he has in 45 for back up wich is 230 Ranger T series +P. He should be far enough back not to need the hand gun most likely.

    My other friend (not confirmed) has a semi auto 12g Winchester, I have breneke short mag slugs he could use I guess, and he could use my PM9 or Tokarev for back up if he wants (probaly on himself at that point)

    Other may come to I asuming with hunting rifles or if friends they would use various shot guns or a Mosin Nagant if they don't have their own guns.

    The hunt will either be in kansas or most likely around Wichita Falls TX

    Any tips on affordable & avaible ammo, or tactics for hog hunting? I havn't found a ton of info on 10mm used on hogs outside of the youtube vid and variou people just saying they have done it.
    Mossberg Maverick 88, Saiga 12, FN FNAR, SKS, SKS Paratrooper, AK-74, Marlin 60, Mosin Nagant 91/30, Browning A bolt II, Kahr PM9, Hi Point C9, Glock 20 (29 chop), Walther P22, Tauras PT92AF, Colt LE6920, Marlin 60SN, Mak-90


  2. #2
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    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
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    Seems like the hogs around here are primarily nocturnal in nature. I've not had a lot of hog hunting experience. The two I've actually taken were both shot with a .30-06.

    A .257 Roberts with a Hornady Light Magnum factory load won't break down a very large hog running directly away as happened to me once on a "control" hunt. Shot up the backside from 35-40 yards, he squealed, kicked up both hind legs like a bucking bronc and kept on truckin'. He was a big ginger-colored hog and the rancher found him dead a couple of days later at the bottom of a column of circling buzzards. He was happy to be rid of one more. This fellow was bedeviled by hogs a few years ago but went to work on them taking 42 one year and something over 50 the next year. It's been several years since he's had problems with hogs rooting and tearing things up around his ranch so he supposes they've moved on.

    His primary hog killing gun? A Ruger Mini-14 .223 with 55 grain M193 FMJ ammunition, occasionally backed up by a Winchester Model 100 .308. He doesn't care about bringing them to bag but only wants to rid himself of as many as possible. The .223 sometimes worked instantly with precise hits but sometimes he found them dead later with the tell-tale buzzards. The .308 with 150 grain bullets puts them down with more authority, especially when they are far out in the middle of one large field he has. Same for the .30-06 I used on one in the same field, hit in the head broadside at 250 yards with a 150 grain handload wound tight.

    Hogs are considered vermin in this part of west central Texas by most landowners who shoot them whenever possible.

    From a stand, one would probably be fine taking even large hogs with precisely placed shots from an SKS or large caliber handgun but if I was to pursue it seriously I'd look to something with a bit more punch, beginning with the .30-30 with 170 grain bullets or some heavier cartridge.
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society "Get heeled! No really"

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Array yz9890's Avatar
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    I've taken a bunch of hogs with just surplus 7.62x39 through a mini 30. drops them just as fast as any soft nose hunting ammo I've used through my 270, 30-30, and 45-70.

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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    Maybe it's just me,but it sounds like you are planning a huge cluster----,you've never been hog hunting,hopefully you are going with a guide,or somebody that knows how to and has access to land,but you are planning on hunting with people possibly arming them with guns and you sound like you have no idea what their expertise is or if they have even hunted.Sounds to me like a recipe for somebody to get shot.I don't hunt in packs of people that just show up.usually the first indication it's time to get out of Dodge is poor muzzle and trigger discipline.
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
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    Member Array hoghunter84's Avatar
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    I've taken hog with calibers as small as the 17HMR. With the right shot placement you can take hogs with your 7.62X39R. It is a good sized round so there really shouldn't be an issue with it. If you double lung them, they won't run far. Shoot for the high shoulder and you'll take out lungs and front legs so that should drop them instantly. Sometimes they like to "bull doze" but usually by the time you get to them they are dead as can be.

  6. #6
    VIP Member Array farronwolf's Avatar
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    Check over this link. A hogs anatomy is very different than a deer. Vital organs are lower and more forward on hogs than on deer. Unless you are going for a spinal shot, don't shoot high. Right through the ear is optimal in my opinion.

    SKS is fine if you don't mind toting that type of gun, wouldn't be my choice, but use what you got, and make the shot count.


    http://www.dixieslugs.com/images/Ana...e_Wild_Hog.pdf
    Just remember that shot placement is much more important with what you carry than how big a bang you get with each trigger pull.
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    Member Array hoghunter84's Avatar
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    I have to disagree with this^.

    If you have a good rest or the hog is still go for a head shot. Most of the time a hog is feeding and rooting up the ground. Trying to hit a moving target is hard enough. Trying to kill a wounded hog is harder. Taking out a large vital organ is the way to go. Don't mess around with trick shots when you pay for a hunt or dot get to go often. Get the job done with a guaranteed kill.

    Note: When a hog is standing still they know something isn't right and will usually run off. Choose your shots carefully. A wounded and angry hog is a great danger to you and/or your partner.
    erichwstein likes this.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array Beans's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoghunter84 View Post
    I have to disagree with this^.

    If you have a good rest or the hog is still go for a head shot. Most of the time a hog is feeding and rooting up the ground. Trying to hit a moving target is hard enough. Trying to kill a wounded hog is harder. Taking out a large vital organ is the way to go. Don't mess around with trick shots when you pay for a hunt or dot get to go often. Get the job done with a guaranteed kill.

    Note: When a hog is standing still they know something isn't right and will usually run off. Choose your shots carefully. A wounded and angry hog is a great danger to you and/or your partner.
    I grew up on a farm in Missouri and we raised Hogs.
    A wounded and angry hog is a great danger to you and/or your partner
    is dangerous to everybody and everything that gets in his way.

  9. #9
    Member Array GregDepot's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info,

    As for dukalmighty, my friend with the scoped sks is experienced in all sorts of hunting to include hogs. We have all served or are currenty serving in the Military and familar with various firearms and none of us are mentaly challenge or a lawyer on Dick Chaney's list. So if its my time be shot or killed so be it, but I'm not to worried honestly. There won't be a guide since my its my friend with the shotguns property. Sorry to rant when your trying to be helpfull I think but thats not really what I was asking.
    Mossberg Maverick 88, Saiga 12, FN FNAR, SKS, SKS Paratrooper, AK-74, Marlin 60, Mosin Nagant 91/30, Browning A bolt II, Kahr PM9, Hi Point C9, Glock 20 (29 chop), Walther P22, Tauras PT92AF, Colt LE6920, Marlin 60SN, Mak-90

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