Black Powder Revolvers

Black Powder Revolvers

This is a discussion on Black Powder Revolvers within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I recently got an issue of Cabellas in the mail and was going through it and noticed they had some black powder revolvers (remakes, of ...

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Thread: Black Powder Revolvers

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array blitzburgh's Avatar
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    Black Powder Revolvers

    I recently got an issue of Cabellas in the mail and was going through it and noticed they had some black powder revolvers (remakes, of course). I've always been a fan of Civil War era handguns but have absolutely no experience with black powder loading or even reloading modern rounds.

    Basically, I'm just curious about how expensive it would be to shoot somewhat regularly and also how difficult it is to do so (far as loading and I'm also curious about the accuracy of them? Is this something a novice should stray from or dive into?

    Thanks in advance!
    "Rebellion against tyrants is obedience to God." - Benjamin Franklin
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  2. #2
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    Hi blitzburgh;

    I gave the black powder revolver a try many years ago. I love old guns so it seemed like it'd be a natural. I had previously shot friends' and relatives' replicas so acquired a .44 cailber rendition of a 1851 Colt Navy. It was usefully accurate for me out to 15 yards. I decided though that it was an awfull lot of trouble for the amount of shooting that could be accomplished in an afternoon and the "new" wore off by the end of the second outing. I sold the revolver to my dentist who hung it over his fire place.

    I decided to stick with antique firearms taking self-contained metallic cartridge ammunition.

    One benefit of using the black powder revolvers is that a fellow who doens't already reload can learn many of the rudiments of handloading when loading up an old percussion revolver. In effect, the revolvers come with their own "reloading press." Only the cartridge case is missing.
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    Is this something a novice should stray from or dive into? <~~~ Dive into it.

    Also they can be extremely accurate.

    Go to YouTube and search Black Powder Revolver or even try searching the specific model that you're most interested in and you should find some instructional Vids and some shooting demonstrations.

    You are in for a fun time if you decide to buy one.

    If you don't care about being super authentic and just want to enjoy shooting black powder then opt for the Stainless Steel which is a bit easier w/ regard to the general maintainence.
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  4. #4
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    I used to carry a Remington 1858 .44 with me during muzzle loading season. I killed a bunch of squirrels with it and performed a coupe de gras on a few deer.
    As for accuracy, it would easily whack a squirrel out to around 50 yards, no problem.

    A story...

    Many moons ago, when the common sense was common and the world had manly men it, I shot an 8 point buck with my Thompson Center Renegade. Being a single shot rifle, I was about to re load it when another 10 point buck walked up right behind me. Not wanting to spook it, I very slowly removed my pistol from its holster, and brought it to bear on that deer which was only about 10 yards out.

    That deer knew something was up but couldn't figure it out. When it finally dropped its head to the ground, I cocked that Remington and the click,click,click... sounded about like a Confederate 12 pound Howitzer going off in those quiet woods. The deer threw its head up and I more or less instinctively shot and hit it right between the eyes. That deer dropped like a sack of potatoes and piled up right there.

    Big mistake. I had walked about 1/2 mile or so from the 4 wheeler. I drug that deer over to the other, and then walked off to get the 4 wheeler. When I came back, both of the deer were big enough that I could barely load them up. I wished often that I had a video of me trying to get both deer on the back of that thing because it would have been comical. I wound up using the winch I had on it, pulling the cable over the handlebars, wrapping the cable around the rack and using the which to drag it up and on to the wheeler. The first one wasn't that bad. Doing that to the second one resulted in it falling off several times. I finally got it to stay by wedging part of its antler in rear rack and using a couple of tie down straps to keep them both there.

    A mans got to do what a mans got to do.

    In my humble opinion, any one that is into firearms needs to experience the black powder realm, just for history's sake if nothing else. They are fun to shoot and can be amazingly accurate. In many states, a black powder season for deer and bear will give you some extra time out in the woods when they aren't so full of hunters. I love it.
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  5. #5
    Ex Member Array barstoolguru's Avatar
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    I have a lot of fun with mine, slow yes and not the most powerful but when you shoot this type if guns it is better to get into the period with dress. Re-enactors get to gather and have shootings and trade goods as they would have done back in 1851 or 1861 during the start of the civil war. My uncle made flint locks from scratch. Now he is in the NC brigade around 1778 and they play army when they were fighting the British

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    VIP Member Array mprp's Avatar
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    Black powder revolvers are a blast! I used to have a .44 and if I remember correctly my buddy had a .32 (?) Hmm it's been a while but all I can say is that I shot his more accurately than I could with my .44. I think we had them just to play with, enjoying every shot with that big grey smoke cloud. And man how those things get dirty! I say if it's something you'd nibble on, go for it. You never know, could become your favorite hobby.

    That .44 was actually my very first handgun and in a way I wish I hadn't sold it. I would like to suggest that you do talk to someone that is very familiar with them as they are a different animal. Not that complicated but just different. Maybe even take it in to a shop and show them and ask for their input after you get it. Chances are, if they sell the balls, caps, powder or other accessories, they probably should have someone there that can guide you in the right direction and give you some tips to be safe with it. Brings back some good memories thinking about it.

    Enjoy!
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    VIP Member Array blitzburgh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Hi blitzburgh;

    I gave the black powder revolver a try many years ago. I love old guns so it seemed like it'd be a natural. I had previously shot friends' and relatives' replicas so acquired a .44 cailber rendition of a 1851 Colt Navy. It was usefully accurate for me out to 15 yards. I decided though that it was an awfull lot of trouble for the amount of shooting that could be accomplished in an afternoon and the "new" wore off by the end of the second outing. I sold the revolver to my dentist who hung it over his fire place.

    I decided to stick with antique firearms taking self-contained metallic cartridge ammunition.

    One benefit of using the black powder revolvers is that a fellow who doens't already reload can learn many of the rudiments of handloading when loading up an old percussion revolver. In effect, the revolvers come with their own "reloading press." Only the cartridge case is missing.
    That's actually one of the two I was considering! There's just something about the era's style of handguns that nags at my attraction. After I put in a good bit of quality time with it, I'd probably turn it into a mantle piece down the road. Also, great point about the reloading as that's something I'd like to get into as well.

    I'm here to learn and I appreciate all the input from you guys!
    "Rebellion against tyrants is obedience to God." - Benjamin Franklin
    "Experience: that most brutal of teachers. But you learn, my God do you learn." - C.S. Lewis

  8. #8
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    Black powder revolvers can be a lot of fun to shoot. Word of advice though. Use Ox-Yoke Wonder Wads with it. Much easier and cleaner than using grease. The last thing you want to encounter is a chain fire!
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  9. #9
    VIP Member Array mprp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by archer51 View Post
    Black powder revolvers can be a lot of fun to shoot. Word of advice though. Use Ox-Yoke Wonder Wads with it. Much easier and cleaner than using grease. The last thing you want to encounter is a chain fire!
    Absolutely! A 1851 Navy Colt on instant full auto is NOT a good thing.
    bmcgilvray likes this.
    Vietnam Vets, WELCOME HOME

    Crossman 760 BB/Pellet, Daisy Red Ryder, Crossman Wrist Rocket, 14 Steak Knives, 3 Fillet Knives, Rolling Pin-14", Various Hunting Knives, 2 Baseball Bats, 3 Big Dogs and a big American Flag flying in the yard. I have no firearms; Try the next house.

  10. #10
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    Yes, I too used the Wonder Wads when I played with the old Colt replica. By comparison grease would be yuck. A chain-fire would be yuckier!
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society

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  11. #11
    VIP Member Array mprp's Avatar
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    Not sure what cool stuff they have now days. But back in the day I did use that pretty pink grease out of the squeeze bottle. It was messy but didn't take away from the fun. Did anyone else use just soap and water to clean theirs after disassembling? We were instructed to soak the parts in warm soapy water to clean. At first, we were in disbelief but after many times of cleaning this way it settled in as acceptable. Of course after drying off all of the parts, they'd get a nice, light rubdown with oil. Worked well and no rust. That used to be my main worry at first.
    Vietnam Vets, WELCOME HOME

    Crossman 760 BB/Pellet, Daisy Red Ryder, Crossman Wrist Rocket, 14 Steak Knives, 3 Fillet Knives, Rolling Pin-14", Various Hunting Knives, 2 Baseball Bats, 3 Big Dogs and a big American Flag flying in the yard. I have no firearms; Try the next house.

  12. #12
    Ex Member Array barstoolguru's Avatar
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    I started off with Crisco grease and needless to say I didn't have a rust problem and the range smelled like moms home cooking then someone turned me on to the felt pads

  13. #13
    Senior Member Array Zsnake's Avatar
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    The important thing to remember is ALWAYS clean the black powder residue completely out of the firearm before returning it to your vault (or whatever). The powder breaks down into a salt after firing and will do a job on your metal.

    I bought a .44 from a guy at a re-enactment meet and was commenting on the chore of cleaning same. He looked me in the eye and said "You're married, ain't ya?". I told him yes, I was. With a twinkle in his eye he told me "When I get off the range, I take off the barrel and cylinder and put the whole thing in the dishwasher. Does a great job of cleaning. 'Course it makes a mess in the washer."
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