38 special hurts - Page 2

38 special hurts

This is a discussion on 38 special hurts within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I have a steel frame and hogue mono grips and don't have a problem with recoil from .38 +P's, now Buffalo Bore 180 gr .357's ...

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 30 of 30
Like Tree15Likes

Thread: 38 special hurts

  1. #16
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,501
    I have a steel frame and hogue mono grips and don't have a problem with recoil from .38 +P's, now Buffalo Bore 180 gr .357's is another matter
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,


  2. #17
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    10,098
    Quote Originally Posted by pgrass101 View Post
    I have a steel frame and hogue mono grips and don't have a problem with recoil from .38 +P's, now Buffalo Bore 180 gr .357's is another matter
    Hi pgrass101;

    Do those 180 grain .357 loads rattle the fillings in one's teeth?


    I personally feel the J-Frame Airweight revolvers are oversold. They would seem to be better suited as a special-purpose back-up gun for professionals than as a popular general-purpose self-defense choice for the less experienced shooter. Sales of the things say otherwise though.
    glockman10mm and mcp1810 like this.
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society

    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  3. #18
    Member Array GunTrooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    173
    I had an inexpensive Bersa 5-shot snubby, with rubber grips that wrapped around the backstrap. The frame was actual steel (not aluminum or alloy). Not the most sophisticated or lightweight revolver, but very reliable as an on-duty back-up (just not to comfortable for ankle carry...). Good gun overall and not uncomfortable to shoot.

  4. #19
    VIP Member
    Array PEF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    3,820
    Quote Originally Posted by MLittle View Post

    I think she would like an all steel revolver such as a Ruger SP101 or a Smith and Wesson 686 with a 2-4inch barrel. Sure, they are going to weigh 25-27 oz instead of the 15 oz for a S&W J frame, but they will be a pleasure to shoot 38+p and they won't sting your hand.
    That's a bit light for a 686, the L frames run in the 40 oz range. A j-frame model 640 or model 60 is in the 24 oz range, and the added weight with the Spegel style rubber grip makes it tame with .38's. But yes, you are spot on that the airweights are often not well received by some shooters.

    To the OP - how does your wife carry? In a purse? If so, an all steel revolver may be the way to go. But before you drop 600 bucks on one, you might try the grips that come with the .357 j-frames:

    Product: J Synthetic Full Size Grip with S&W Logo

    They cover the back strap and engage the pinky. The stock boot grips on the .38 airweights are good for concealment, but you need a firm hand grip to sink the backstrap into the palm and keep that pinky on the bottom of the frame to tame the recoil. Some people have trouble managing light revolvers with boot grips.
    Last edited by PEF; July 26th, 2012 at 11:47 PM. Reason: horrible writing

  5. #20
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,501
    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Hi pgrass101;

    Do those 180 grain .357 loads rattle the fillings in one's teeth?
    .
    I got them to use in the snub while in bear country. I have discovered that if I shoot them in the snub, the second shot is going to be straight up. So if there is a second bear in a tree I've got him too.

    I too think that the air weights are for special purposes and BUG carry, not for general use.
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  6. #21
    Member Array JustinApple's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    71
    Any light weight revolver is going to be murder on your hands/wrist..

    +1 on the Hogue Grips this will help.

    My wife carries a Sig P238 and a LCR
    She had the problem of racking the slide, the P238 has given her no problems, was easier to manipulate.

    Although the LCR hurts her hands, she still puts 20 rounds down range for practice every week. She loves that gun enough to know its purpose far out weights a little pain once a week.

    Work on different grip styles, my wife finally found one she liked that helped with the bite, plus she can shoot 3" groups @ 15 yards now.

  7. #22
    VIP Member Array Crowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    West Allis WI
    Posts
    2,761
    Have her try this grip.... S&W J Synthetic Full Size Grip
    Product: J Synthetic Full Size Grip with S&W Logo
    "One of the greatest delusions in the world is the hope that the evils in this world are to be cured by legislation."
    --Thomas B. Reed, American Attorney

    Second Amendment -- Established December 15, 1791 and slowly eroded ever since What happened to "..... shall not be infringed."

  8. #23
    VIP Member Array Hiram25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wyoming, DE
    Posts
    11,113
    Houge rubber grip will tame it right down, also aid in holding on to it when fired.
    Hiram25
    You can educate ignorance, you can't fix stupid
    Retired DE Trooper, SA XD40 SC, S&W 2" Airweight
    dukalmighty & Pure Kustom Black Ops Pro "Trooper" Holsters, DE CCDW and LEOSA Permits, Vietnam Vet 68-69 Pleiku

  9. #24
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    8,957
    Another solution is to use full wadcutter target loads. They are usually downloaded and easy shooting.
    Ignorance is a long way from stupid, but left unchecked, can get there real fast.

  10. #25
    Distinguished Member Array Stubborn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Tampa Fl
    Posts
    1,530
    The Hogue grips will help...but be sure you're shooting light loads.
    Go to 110 gr bullets... and if you do your own reloading, you can load light on powder also.
    Just my $.02
    "The beauty of the Second Amendment is that it will not be needed until they try to take it".
    Thomas Jefferson

    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

  11. #26
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    10,098
    Another solution is a better configured snub.

    Two Colts and four Smith & Wessons. This old photo is also buried somewhere in Sixto's famous Superduper Snubby Thread.

    I still have these but have mostly gravitated away from the two J-Frame Smith & Wesson revolvers. I'd rather actually gun fight with one of the larger models. They offer superior ergonomics and recoil absorbing weight and they hide almost as easily as the stunted revolvers. It would be well worth it to seek out a Smith & Wesson 2-inch Model 10 in one's choice of square butt or round butt variant. Even the somewhat less common 2-inch Smith & Wesson Model 12 Airweight with its aluminum alloy frame, offers the K-Frame ergonomics with less weight for those who feel they absolutely can't abide weight. Alas, Smith & Wesson has discontinued Model 10 snubs, along with the Model 12 Airweight due to lack of popularity. These ought to be in current production and selling like hotcakes rather than the midget .38s. The undiscerning personal defense market seeks ever-smaller, ever-lighter though when it would be better off acquiring something it could actually shoot well and dealing with concealment options in order to appropriately carry it.

    Shown here in the 4 Smith & Wesson revolvers is (top) the original Chief's Special which later became the Model 36, an alloy-framed/stainless steel Model 642, a square-butt Military & Police which later became the Model 10, and (bottom) one of the last Model 10 2-inch revolvers produced before that variant was discontinued. This is the round-butt variant.

    The two Colt revolvers represented here are a Detective Special (top) and a Banker's Special, the Banker's Special being a pre-war Colt snub which is chambered for the now obsolescent .38 S&W cartridge, a round that's still better than a .380 ACP. All the other revolvers shown lying on the chair are chambered for .38 Special. They all handle +P loadings fine.

    Me, I've adopted the Detective Special as the best of the breed. It hides as readily as the J-Frame Smith & Wessons, holds 6 rounds rather than only 5, and shoots and behaves in as well-mannered fashion as the K-Frame Model 10 Smith & Wesson snubs. Both the Detective Special and the Model 10 snubs offer service revolver accuracy and handling characteristics. I can conceal a 4-inch Model 10 IWB as easily as a 2-inch so the 2-inch Smith & Wesson guns see less use. They only come out in cold weather for a jacket pocket if it's determined not to wear an IWB holster.

    If a fellow could track down one of the uncommon 3-inch Colt Detective Specials he'd probably have true perfection in a compact self-defense revolver. It would be superior to any 5-shot revolver model currently offered by any maker. For those who yearn for .357 Magnum power then Colt did make up a few Magnum Carry revolvers, a 6-shot stainless steel model variant which is a Detective Special on steroids. Should have been popular but Colt Manufacturing was floundering at the time and few were produced. The existing production are expensive collector's items among the savvy and well-heeled fans of concealed carry revolvers.

    At any rate, all-steel trumps lightweight plastic, aluminum or other -ium alloys in my view.
    Last edited by Rock and Glock; July 27th, 2012 at 03:18 PM.
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society

    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  12. #27
    Member Array rdpG19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    341
    Quote Originally Posted by spider7779 View Post
    S&W airweight 38 special. Gift for wife, so shoots a.25 berrata, .32 keltec, .380 bersa. This is her first revolver ,it hurts her hand when she shoots it, evan when she shoot it with 2 hands. Her grip seems to be ok. Very firm. it does not matter if she grips it hi or low, not using +p . It has a 1.825 +- barrel.

    any suggestions? She likes the gun,she does not like the bite
    Quote Originally Posted by sgb View Post
    Not an uncommon reaction. Two options. one - larger grips, Two - Heavier steel framed gun.
    Another option would be a Ruger SP101 357 she can shoot 38's, its a heaver gun and handles the recoil much better. Lightweight guns hurt the hands.
    US Navy Veteren
    Ruger SP101 357 3" Barrel
    Taurus 65 357 Mag
    Glock 19 Gen3
    Walther PK 380
    www.guntoters.com

  13. #28
    Ex Member Array oldrwizr's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Durham, N.C.
    Posts
    413
    Quote Originally Posted by spider7779 View Post
    S&W airweight 38 special. Gift for wife, so shoots a.25 berrata, .32 keltec, .380 bersa. This is her first revolver ,it hurts her hand when she shoots it, evan when she shoot it with 2 hands. Her grip seems to be ok. Very firm. it does not matter if she grips it hi or low, not using +p . It has a 1.825 +- barrel.

    any suggestions? She likes the gun,she does not like the bite
    I'm surprised because my son has one of those and my daughter loves it. She's more accurate with the .38 than she is with a semi-auto. She's not even strong enough to rack my G23 but loves shooting the Airweight. Surprising.

  14. #29
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,501
    I like the Ruger GP-100 with a 3 inch barrel in .357mag. Alas I don't have one.......yet
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  15. #30
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    27,085
    Quote Originally Posted by spider7779 View Post
    S&W airweight 38 special ... first revolver ... it hurts her hand when she shoots it
    Common. A S&W Airweight is a nice gun, but that lack of weight hugely contributes to the simple physics involved. For every reaction, there's an equal and opposite reaction, as we all know. And with something so very light, the reaction can result in being taken up mostly by the hands. Of course, with a heavier gun a bit more of the energy can get sucked before it strikes the hands.

    Alternatives:
    • Recoil management in which the hands/wrist/elbow/shoulder are all solidly immobile while firing ensures nearly all the force is going to be taken up by the hands. Some work at keeping their shoulder and elbow looser, to allow a person to "go with the flow" during firing, accepting the energy and redirecting it, instead of daring to withstand all of it in the hands. An experienced revolver shooter at the range can probably help you through the minor difference, here, that can make all the difference.

    • Acquire some fatter, softer grips for range purposes: such as something from Pachmayr or Hogue. These can make a world of difference.

    • Consider moving from the Airweight to a heavier revolver, such as a 3in Ruger SP-101 .38/.357. At 14oz, the Airweight can sting. At 25oz, the SP-101 can feel much more reasonable. Of course, it's a bit larger package, so it won't conceal quite as neatly as the Airweight line.

    • A wider grip area (against the web of the hand) distributes the load of the recoil across the hand far better than puny "boot" grips. Most any semi-auto pistol is going to do this better, IMO, with the exception of the super-narrow KelTec P3AT, Kahr P380 and other similarly "skinny" mouseguns. Something to consider, if debating whether to leave revolvers for semi-autos.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

.38 military and police round butt

,
colt detective special and s&w m10 snubs
,

colt detective special vs. smith and wesson chiefs special

,

colt revolver models

,
colts revolvers imagenes
,
j synthetic full size grip
,
ladies shooting gloves
,
my 38 special hurts my hand
,
revolver hurts hand
,
s&w model 10 2
,

s&w pre model 10 2in.

,
smith and wesson revolver snubby
Click on a term to search for related topics.