Dry Firing - Page 2

Dry Firing

This is a discussion on Dry Firing within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I just avoid the issue all together and just use snap caps. Good to have for the range, have someone load a mag with one ...

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Thread: Dry Firing

  1. #16
    Member Array fullmetal1911's Avatar
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    I just avoid the issue all together and just use snap caps. Good to have for the range, have someone load a mag with one mixed in randomly so I can catch myself if I am having issues. Plus they are relatively inexpensive, only need one or two and you can pick them up at gun shows usually wherever they are selling cleaning supplies for 3 bucks each or buy a pack of 5 in the store for $12-15. The only guns I don't dry fire are rimfires but I never really found a reason to dry fire any rimfire I own.


  2. #17
    VIP Member Array multistage's Avatar
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    While most modern centerfire handguns can handle all the dry firing you want, snap caps are a good investment if you are worried.

  3. #18
    Member Array pfries's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dustinhicks1 View Post
    Here is an easy answer. Never pull the trigger on a gun unless you know there is a bullet in there and you are trying to fire the round. It is a good habit that will help prevent you from fire a weapon that you THOUGHT was unloaded
    Quote Originally Posted by buckeye .45 View Post
    Dry fire is a very valuable training tool and technique that can teach a shooter a lot.

    Proper safety precautions, i.e. chamber checks and no ammo in the room, will prevent negligent discharges.
    Not to mention I would not be able to field strip a number of my side arms if I could not pull the trigger on an empty chamber.
    Be safe, be smart, practice regularly.
    Mors est libertas


    MALAD JUSTED

  4. #19
    Member Array fullmetal1911's Avatar
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    When in doubt check the owners manual. If it's not recommended to dry fire the gun it will be mentioned. All my old Kel Tec pistols had it in the manual to not dry fire due to risk of damage, although it doesn't take much to cause a problem with a Kel Tec.
    Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster at your side, kid. - Han Solo
    NRA Member

  5. #20
    Distinguished Member Array Jason Storm's Avatar
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    Depends on the make of the gun. Certain models are tolerant of dryfiring than others. Just to be safe, buy snapcaps (inert rounds) to protect its firing pin from wear and tear.

  6. #21
    Member Array MBRIDER's Avatar
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    Dummy rounds or snap caps are the way to go. You can then also practice clearing malfunctions so if they ever occur while under duress it is second nature to rectify.

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