Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun?

This is a discussion on Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Originally Posted by GlassWolf Don't ever, ever buy a pair of speakers. They take a couple hundred hours to break in and loosen up the ...

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Thread: Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlassWolf View Post
    Don't ever, ever buy a pair of speakers.
    They take a couple hundred hours to break in and loosen up the spiders and moving parts of the drivers, and during that period, can drastically change in sound.
    I am so tone deaf I can't tell the difference between $10 speakers and $1000 speakers. Look at all the money my impairment has saved me! If music comes out, I'm a happy listener.
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    Member Array Cook74's Avatar
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    According to my dealer, a 1911 Kimber requires about 1000 rounds through it to be smooth and functioning. I personally think it is crazy to pay a premium for a Kimber and have to shoot 1000 rounds of ammo... just stooopid to me...
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  4. #18
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    Yes.
    I also have a break in procedure for them. I know several people in the firearms manufacturing industry and I see what they have to deal with in the warranty departments and how to avoid an issue.

    Even my revolvers seem to work better after a few hundred rounds thru them.

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    When I first purchased my sr40c the slide was very difficult to rack, the more I shoot it the easier it is. Is this not a break in time?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ksgunner View Post
    When I first purchased my sr40c the slide was very difficult to rack, the more I shoot it the easier it is. Is this not a break in time?
    Maybe more like the recoil spring weakening through use. The slide "functioned" correctly from the getgo, right? I think the thread is referring to guns that fail to feed, eject, etc., when new.
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    I don't know. Maybe it's just me, but I never realized much difference from the first time I shot my guns to after 1000's of rounds.My Semi auto hand guns shot the same then and now after 1000's of rounds. Same with my rifles too. All were accurate right out from the box. First time I took my savage 93R17 17 hmr to the range, i shot dime size groups at 100 yards (after having her sighted in). After so many years, it still shoots the same. I'm just lucky? haha.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cook74 View Post
    According to my dealer, a 1911 Kimber requires about 1000 rounds through it to be smooth and functioning. I personally think it is crazy to pay a premium for a Kimber and have to shoot 1000 rounds of ammo... just stooopid to me...
    Let's see: 1000 rounds, 20 boxes at, say, $20 a box, additional $400. Yeah, I'd have bought a RIA and enjoyed a lot more shooting.
    Last edited by OldVet; October 22nd, 2012 at 10:24 PM.
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  9. #23
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    Originally Posted by _Hawkeye_
    But I believe a quality weapon fucntions day one.
    The generally do. However most of us cannot or choose not to pay the extra money required to make one of those quality firearms. Just think of the extra money it costs the company to hand fit and polish each part to ensure that high quality.
    I have one hand finished firearm. Its so much better quality than an off the rack model that its hard to describe. It also cost me three times what the off the shelf mass produced model did.

    Michael

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Let's see: 1000 rounds, 20 boxes at, say, $20 a box, additional $400. Yeah, I'd have bought a RIA and enjoyed a lot more shooting.
    Breaking in is shooting. That's all it means. You take your guns to the range and shoot them regularly, don't you? What's the difference? Whether you can call it "breaking in" or just range time, it's still just shooting. Regardless of what certain people or manufacturers say, the majority of a maker's line will run fine from the beginning. So, go to the range, practice and have fun. You can call it breaking it in if you like.

  11. #25
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    No. None of the brands I own needed any. They work perfectly out of the box.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cook74 View Post
    According to my dealer, a 1911 Kimber requires about 1000 rounds through it to be smooth and functioning. I personally think it is crazy to pay a premium for a Kimber and have to shoot 1000 rounds of ammo... just stooopid to me...
    A local dealer told exactly the same thing, unbelievable. I never looked at another Kimber. He explained that I should expect failures during this period.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyDTrigger View Post
    No. None of the brands I own needed any. They work perfectly out of the box.
    Same here.
    Utah Concealed Firearms Certified Instructor

  14. #28
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    Sig Sauer recommends a 'breakin', but I suspect that is the lawyers talking in case of a malfunction. I fired over 300 rounds through my wife's P238 using various brands and types of ammo without a single malfunction of any kind.

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    I have bought two guns new. A Taurus PT845, and my current Springfield XDM. Both of them I expected to perform out of the box and I believe in a 'break-in' period for guns. Some of it being me getting use to the new weapon and its features and how it handles. And secondly all the moving parts. I believe both my Taurus and I know my Springfield manual calls for a break in period.

    -jared

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    Like others when I buy something I expect it to work the way it is supposed to right out of the box. With that being said I have no problem with taking a new gun to the range and dumping 50 or so rounds through it to make sure all is right with the world but if someone tells me I have to shoot 1000 rounds and expect malfunctions during that time I will simply purchase something else.

    Now I fully understand and accept that a particular gun may not like a certain load or magazine but to purchase a new gun and immediately have to go out and buy a new mag or aftermarket part to make it work is unacceptable. If one manufacture can make something that works why can't they.
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