Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun?

This is a discussion on Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I had a kahr that had it's first 500 rounds worth of malfunctions constantly blamed on being part of break-in, but outside of it, glocks, ...

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Thread: Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun?

  1. #46
    Member Array msc8127's Avatar
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    I had a kahr that had it's first 500 rounds worth of malfunctions constantly blamed on being part of break-in, but outside of it, glocks, m&p's, and sig have been as reliable from the first round through the tube as they are now.

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  3. #47
    VIP Member Array tkruf's Avatar
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    Re: Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun?

    For revolvers, Glocks, and Springfield XD's, no. Everything else, yes.

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  4. #48
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IAm_Not_Lost View Post
    Many other things in life that cost lots of money need a break in period, stands to reason guns would too.
    But a defensive firearm is one of few things we're betting our lives on. Sad, that the makers of such tools believe them to be tantamount to a normal, everyday "stuff" people buy every day.

    On such tools, I'd much prefer that the standard sought by the manufacturer be Failure Is Not An Option, typical in some industries (ie, telecomm satellite production, in which 15+ yrs flawless operation is a min. standard). One would think life-saving tools would be afforded some element of that care and concern, given the gravity of failure.
    Last edited by ccw9mm; October 24th, 2012 at 09:35 AM.
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  5. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cook74 View Post
    According to my dealer, a 1911 Kimber requires about 1000 rounds through it to be smooth and functioning. I personally think it is crazy to pay a premium for a Kimber and have to shoot 1000 rounds of ammo... just stooopid to me...
    I bet your dealer sells a lot of ammo, eh?
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  6. #50
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    New guns and friends, the break-in period is called 'trust building'.
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  7. #51
    Distinguished Member Array lchamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retsupt99 View Post
    New guns and friends, the break-in period is called 'trust building'.
    And it keeps the legal department happy. I may be just lucky, but I have not had any problems with any of my guns during the 'break-in period'.

    I certainly agree with the 'trust building' comment.

  8. #52
    Member Array nazshooter's Avatar
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    Re: Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun?

    Considering how long most guns I'd say we already get amazing reliability for the price. If you want telecom satellite level quality control then what you'll get is a gun few can afford.

    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post

    On such tools, I'd much prefer that the standard sought by the manufacturer be Failure Is Not An Option, typical in some industries (ie, telecomm satellite production, in which 15+ yrs flawless operation is a min. standard). One would think life-saving tools would be afforded some element of that care and concern, given the gravity of failure.


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  9. #53
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nazshooter View Post
    Considering how long most guns I'd say we already get amazing reliability for the price. If you want telecom satellite level quality control then what you'll get is a gun few can afford.
    Some element of that care and concern could go a long way. It needn't be telecomm satellite grade quality and reliability. But the hit-and-miss approach many firearms makers take doesn't cut it, IMO, not with a life saving tool. There's just no excuse for that.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
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  10. #54
    VIP Member Array First Sgt's Avatar
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    OK OK OK...perhaps MY definition of "running" a weapon vs "breaking in" a weapon is very similar...

    When I purchase a weapon, before I "run" it, I do several things:
    1. Read the Manual
    2. Inspect the weapon
    3. Clean the weapon
    4. Try all movable parts (slide, trigger, mag ejection, etc)
    5. Dry fire in the privacy of my home
    6. Now I'm ready to go to the range and "run" 50 - 200 rounds of various and sundry ammo
    7. Rule out the ammo that wasn't weapon compatible
    8. If semi-automatic, remove any mags with feed problems, refire weapon
    9. Gauge weapon reliability on this initial range trip.
    10. Home, clean my weapon and prepare for next range trip
    11. If my EDC, load n lock. (Note: if this is a new weapon, and I'm planning to make it either my EDC, BUG, or put in some type of rotation for carry, I will NOT enter it into that mode until I am confident in it's functioning properly and flawlessly.)

    Now, if you want to call that "breaking in" a weapon, the so be it. I call it a performance test and nothing else. JMO
    Sometimes in life you have to stand your ground. It's a hard lesson to learn and even most adults don't get it, but in the end only I can be responsible for my life. If faced with any type of adversity, only I can overcome it. Waiting for someone else to take responsibility is a long fruitless wait.

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    I don't define breaking-in of firearms as merely trying it out to see how it works. I define it as a new gun that "requires" "X" number of rounds to make it work properly, a reliability or functional issue, not one of building faith in a particular round, etc. While I can agree that certain makes don't like a particular brand or bullet shape (Some I don't either), I do expect a new gun to function otherwise. If down the road gun "X" desides Brand C ammo isn't so bad after all, that's fine. Some guns will never function properly with Brand C ammo regardless of number of rounds fired.
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    Distinguished Member Array hardluk1's Avatar
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    Some owners simple don't have the basic skill sets to make some small heavier recoiling pistols function well enough. And then you have a old school hand fit pistols that you also have to be shot in to make it work at it best. If a person buys any of these firearms today with out reviewing them on these forums or simple searchs first and knowing going in any problems they might have going in and then whine about it maybe should not own a firearm. They don't have the common sence to work thew the problems to find if the issues are ammo, shooter or firearm. At that point it can make for a good deal on a firearm for some of us.

  13. #57
    Senior Member Array Spidey2011's Avatar
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    I'll be tolerant of a couple minor malfunctions in the first 100 rounds or so, but some of what I see attributed to a "break-in period" is just ridiculous. I've had one gun that malfunctioned in the first magazine, and never had an issue after that. I also had one gun that started malfunctioning around the 500 round mark. Sold that piece of crap after the second trip back to the factory.

    If it don't work right, I won't use it. Constant FTF's or FTE's will result in a gun being returned.

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