Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun?

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Thread: Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun?

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    Member Array ponchsox's Avatar
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    Do you believe in a "break in period" for a new gun?

    And what exactly does this mean? I have yet to find a new pistol that isn't great out of the box magically smooth itself out after 500 rounds.

    Or does this mean a period where the shooter gets more comfortable with the pistol, experiments with ammo, etc.?

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    VIP Member Array rammerjammer's Avatar
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    For revolvers no.

    Some semi autos do require a break in period.
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    Revolvers, “more elegant weapons for a more civilized age.”

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    I've seen 1911 pistols that didn't feed well until they'd been through a couple hundred rounds. Outside of that I think it is just people talking about all pistols as if they were 1911s.
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    Distinguished Member Array bigmacque's Avatar
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    I think it takes some time to get things working together, including the shooter holding the gun.
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    I'm in favor of gun control -- I think every citizen should have control of a gun.
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Believe in a break-in? Absolutely.

    I've had far too many semi-auto pistols fail to perfectly cycle various rounds to believe in any magic related to the acronym "NIB." Untried = untested = uncertain. No real way around that, except to test it until fairly certain. That's about what it means to me.

    Different guns will perform differently in any break-in testing. Only a couple of pistols have eaten practically everything I've given them, with only early rounds having the occasional bobble. The most-reliable of these is the H&K P2000SK 9mm; the CZ P-01 9mm; and, once it broke in, the Browning BDM 9mm. Everything else has performed far less reliably and basically required an extended break-in period, to loosen up sufficiently to eat everything it was fed.
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    Distinguished Member Array bigmacque's Avatar
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    ccw9 brings up an excellent point: spending some time to make sure the gun handles the ammo you like is a good idea. That can easily be defined as a break-in period / test.
    I'm in favor of gun control -- I think every citizen should have control of a gun.
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    Member Array _Hawkeye_'s Avatar
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    I believe in breaking me in, not the weapon. I think I require time with a new gun to become intimately familiar with it and its operation. But I believe a quality weapon fucntions day one.
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by _Hawkeye_ View Post
    But I believe a quality weapon fucntions day one.
    I certainly believe a quality weapon should function Day One. Sadly, that's not been my experience four times out of five. Hence, the testing regimen.
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    VIP Member Array peckman28's Avatar
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    Unless it's a fairly tight target pistol or many of the super-tight 1911s out there, the weapon shouldn't need a break in period at all. That's a load of nonsense, and if I had a semi-auto that actually needed to be "broken in" to be reliable, I would not trust it with my life. Matter of fact, even my 1911s (a Springfield, a Colt, and a SIG) haven't really needed to be broken in. They're all working just fine right now, like they did the day I got them. As far as you getting used to the gun, or verifying that your chosen ammo works well, that's a different story. I wouldn't classify an "acquaintance" period with a break-in period, though the former will be needed with any unfamiliar weapon you add to your collection.

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    Distinguished Member Array GlassWolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ponchsox View Post
    And what exactly does this mean? I have yet to find a new pistol that isn't great out of the box magically smooth itself out after 500 rounds.

    Or does this mean a period where the shooter gets more comfortable with the pistol, experiments with ammo, etc.?
    Both time to get used to the gun, and time for the springs to wear in a bit.. New springs can be a little stiffer than after they've been used a thousand times or so. How much different will depend on a lot of factors in metals, use, spring weight, etc.. If you want the gun to be smoother, give it to a gun smith to fit and polish out the contact surfaces for you instead.

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    When I get a new acquisition, I immediately run about two hundred rounds through it. The break-in period is thus completed.
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Ponchsox, here's an interesting discussion thread from awhile back, on one aspect of a testing/break-in period: Initial Range Reports / Low Round-Count Reports.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
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    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

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    I think any product I pay hundreds of dollars for should work right "out of the box." Period. I wouldn't accept a Mr. Coffee that needed 12 pots brewed thru it before it made coffee right.

    But the fact remains, and it seems with the higher the price, some makes do require a break-in. Blame some of it on the lack of skilled machinists or the expense to use them, but surfaces can be rough, things may catch, and sometimes a little wear makes things better.

    I find it irritating when things don't work, especially new things, regardless of price. I wouldn't expect a Glock to need breaking in; I would with a 1911. If I were buying a 1911, I'd expect a few issues at first. I'd also expect it to live up to the 1911 reputation at some point.
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    Ex Member Array Yoda's Avatar
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    Just to wear off the high spots and decrease friction, that is the reason for break in.

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    Distinguished Member Array GlassWolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    I think any product I pay hundreds of dollars for should work right "out of the box." Period. I wouldn't accept a Mr. Coffee that needed 12 pots brewed thru it before it made coffee right.

    But the fact remains, and it seems with the higher the price, some makes do require a break-in. Blame some of it on the lack of skilled machinists or the expense to use them, but surfaces can be rough, things may catch, and sometimes a little wear makes things better.

    I find it irritating when things don't work, especially new things, regardless of price. I wouldn't expect a Glock to need breaking in; I would with a 1911. If I were buying a 1911, I'd expect a few issues at first. I'd also expect it to live up to the 1911 reputation at some point.
    Don't ever, ever buy a pair of speakers.
    They take a couple hundred hours to break in and loosen up the spiders and moving parts of the drivers, and during that period, can drastically change in sound.

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