Dog's fear or firearm? - Page 2

Dog's fear or firearm?

This is a discussion on Dog's fear or firearm? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; You could try a "Thunder Shirt" Thundershirt | The Best Dog Anxiety Treatment I've heard they really work but haven't tried it on my dog....

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Thread: Dog's fear or firearm?

  1. #16
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    Array Jeanlouise's Avatar
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    You could try a "Thunder Shirt" Thundershirt | The Best Dog Anxiety Treatment
    I've heard they really work but haven't tried it on my dog.
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  2. #17
    Senior Member Array mulle46's Avatar
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    Seen those, have wondered about the effectiveness. May give them a shot. Thanks
    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along." . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Eleanor Roosevelt

  3. #18
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    Since I was a small boy a couple of my relatives told me to never point a gun or hold a knife close to a dog's face. I found out the hard way that this was true at the time. They claimed a dog knew what it was? An old wive's tale maybe but I when i show a knife or a gun to either of my dogs they give me the "feeling" that it would be unwise to move any closer. BTW, none of my dogs have ever been exposed to the sound of gunfire, they stay in the house mostly, but seem to stay very alert until the weapon is out of sight. Had a Rott that loved fireworks though, he'd run and grab them and enjoyed them exploding in his mouth. This only happened a couple of times by accident. Seems he loved the smell and taste of gunpowder and sulpher. Our cats couldn't care less about guns or knives though. Anyone care to explain this?

  4. #19
    Distinguished Member Array Diddle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanlouise View Post
    You can probably train him by making the gun a "happy experience". Every time you get it out...he gets a treat. Leave it laying around where he can see it and smell it in his own good time. Put a treat near it too. You have to get him to think of the gun as his friend, not something to be afraid of. It might take awhile but I bet he comes around. I love Boxers.
    Excellent post!

    Spend some private time with your scared pet. Let him/her lounge around you when you have have the firearm out in the open. When you hold the firearm, pet the dog to the extent he/she gets tired and want no more attention. When he/she comes back to you, make sure you have the firearm displayed or perhaps in your hand. Again pet your animal and make over him/her and this time have a treat near by. Repeat this over and over until you can give the animal a treat and when he/she is eating it, pet the animal and fire a dry round. This tkes a lot of time but eventually the animal will associate the treat with affection and mostly ignire the sound. Cats for example are normally scared to death of the sound of a paper sack however if one is left open and laying on the floor they eventually get in it and play. With enough peat and repeat your dog will associate the clicking and racking of the slide as something that is relates to bonding and friendship. This takes time but it eventually works out fine. If you happen to show a bit more affection to one animal more than the other, this can be a good thing. You see, if dog A is unaffected and dog B is scared, dog A will want to acquire the attention and affection that dog B is getting. This in turn makes dog B want to associate enought in the process to take on the traits of dog A. I have worked with animals for over 40 years and no two are even remotely similar but you can use one animal to edicate and train another. They watch closely what the other one does and how it reacts to things in its enviroment.

    Regards,
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  5. #20
    VIP Member Array blitzburgh's Avatar
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    Re: Dog's fear or firearm?

    My two pitbulls have no problem with the sound of gunshots. I have a range on my property and they pretty much just sit and watch me shoot or go about their business (of course, never in the line of fire) but they do not like the sight of a gun INSIDE the house. Its to the point where they have to to outside if my son plays with his nerf gun. On more than one occasion one of them had snapped at my hand in attempts to remove the gun.

    I'm personally okay with that.

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  6. #21
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    My retriever never could stand the sight of a gun. She usually just walked away when she saw one.
    As we used to teach in the spook business, carry a 25 if it makes you feel good, but do not ever load it. If you load it you may shoot it. If you shoot it you may hit somebody, and if you hit somebody - and he finds out about it - he may be very angry with you. -- Jeff Cooper

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    Member Array ws76133's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kublid View Post
    Lol. Thx guys. I'm gonna try the ideas mentioned to get him acquainted with it. Boy, if he's around when I shoot it, he may just fall over and die in a pool of his own urine. Lol.
    Or you can follow the urine stream to locate the panicked pooch.

  8. #23
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    ive also noticed that my 2yr old parson jack russell terrier is afraid of loud noises, there are alot of firecrackers around my neighborhood going off all year long. if my dog is outside he starts to scratch at the door to come in the house,I always thought he would be able to handle loud bangs since he is bred as a hunting dog by instinct, even though he is just our family pet. he also hides and goes in his crate whenever I have a firearm in view. I want to take him with me when I go shooting on private land so he can run around in 200+ acres of open space but I dont think he could handle the gunfire. So unfortunately he gets left at home alot.I wondered about the thundershirts too, When I did internet review searches on them it was 50/50. some say it worked only temporarily and then the dogs went back to being scared after they got used to wearing them.
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  9. #24
    Senior Member Array mulle46's Avatar
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    That was my thought about those shirts, that they would get used to the compression. That's why I just run my dog to engage his mind elsewhere.
    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along." . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Eleanor Roosevelt

  10. #25
    VIP Member Array Eagleks's Avatar
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    Mine jump up , go on alert, and get ready to jump on someone ...... they associate my having a gun in my hand with someone or something that shouldn't be there, and their chance to locate, bark at, run at, chase, or bite something. They also know if I put my holster and gun on, it's time we're going somewhere and they want to go along.

    When they see me with my gun .... and then I pull out my cleaning stuff..... they look me with utter disappointment and then go back and lay down.

    I've worked with them .... different commands, etc. to 'locate', check a room/yard , one is a tracking dog as well, and to alert me to the presence of someone (esp in the dark & outside) , and that it's a "fun" thing..... kind of like playing "hide and seeK" for the dogs. If we find someone ... or something.... or track it down when told.... they get treats, loves, rubs, etc.
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  11. #26
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blitzburgh View Post
    My two pitbulls have no problem with the sound of gunshots. I have a range on my property and they pretty much just sit and watch me shoot or go about their business (of course, never in the line of fire) but they do not like the sight of a gun INSIDE the house.
    Smart dogs, I'd say, fully realizing what such an outdoor noise would be like inside the house. Which is just another indicator that dogs can be shown what's acceptable and tolerable, if they're introduced to it effectively.

    Had a terrier years ago that didn't mind loud/sharp/crackly noises. Wouldn't shy away from much. With all the July 4th noises, he'd typically go like gangbusters to the source of the noise to check it out / take it out. Did that a couple of times and disliked the result, bless his little heart. Never did fire guns around him, but I wouldn't be surprise if he'd have taken to it like a duck to water.
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  12. #27
    RAL
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    The Thunder Shirt is not magic. It takes the edge off so you can perhaps work with the dog and do a bit of desensitization training. When there is a thunder storm coming, my dog goes to the place where we keep his shirt and waits for me to put it on. If you put one on a cat, and stand the cat on it's feet and let go, the cat falls over and starts purring. They don't work for all dogs but are worth a try!
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  13. #28
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    My lab couldn't even be around sparklers. Think it might have been the smell. She didn't want the kids around them either. When I let the kids have them I would have to keep her in the house. She would try to get them out of their hands and then drag them away from the sparklers.
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  14. #29
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    I have two labs close to the same age. Not related at all but came from the same breeder. One is a social butterfly and will just look at you in confusion but not fear after shooting, the other is horrified of strangers, the dark, and hides when she hears me shooting even a 22lr.

    Goose

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