Glock 19 - Low & Left - Suggestions?

This is a discussion on Glock 19 - Low & Left - Suggestions? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Originally Posted by OldVet A recent gun rag article suggested balancing a penny on the front sight while dry firing until you can keep the ...

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Thread: Glock 19 - Low & Left - Suggestions?

  1. #31
    Member Array pilgrimshooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    A recent gun rag article suggested balancing a penny on the front sight while dry firing until you can keep the penny from falling off. Like I can get the penny to stay on without pulling the trigger.
    Yeah, my instructor did the same thing with an empty shell.
    Don't bring a knife to a gun fight...unless it's strapped to a gun.

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcclarke View Post
    OP, you say that the problem is less if you shoot one-handed. That suggests to me that it is your left hand causing the difficulty. How do you position your left hand? Do you have your left index finger on the front of the trigger guard by any chance?
    No, I don't. It sits over my other fingers, both thumbs forward.
    Don't bring a knife to a gun fight...unless it's strapped to a gun.

  4. #33
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    Okay, try this (I had the same problem):
    Low left means you may be slapping the trigger. The trigger of the Glock takes some getting used to. I had this problem and still do to some extent, but not anywhere near as bad.
    Because of the trigger, your support hand (left hand if you're right handed), is not holding the pistol enough to compensate for how much your middle and ring finger on your dominant are pulling down on your Glock. Mixed in with the angle of the grip, and you'll end up shooting low/left.
    I used the Ayoob Wedge, and it changed everything. Do a Google search for it.
    In addition, I shot AR-15's and 1911's a lot throughout my life, and ALWAYS put the meaty portion of my trigger finger before the first knuckle on the trigger. Don't do that with a Glock. Use the actual joint indention itself.
    So, try these two things and report back:
    1. Ayoob Wedge
    2. Use first joint, not meaty portion of index finger.

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by pilgrimshooter View Post
    Yeah, my instructor did the same thing with an empty shell.
    Both the penny and spent brass methods work well. It does help to have some one balance the object for you while you just concentrate on holding the platform steady. Now, if you can regularly dry-fire with something balanced on the front sight without dislodging it, you will have dealt with your trigger jerk.
    "Mind own business"
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  6. #35
    Member Array Simonsay's Avatar
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    Find a shooter that teaches... and take a class. The front sight will tell you everything you need to know while dry firing. Penny not needed.

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simonsay View Post
    Find a shooter that teaches... and take a class. The front sight will tell you everything you need to know while dry firing. Penny not needed.
    Absolutely true. The penny or brass is not needed and the sight will tell you all you need to know.

    However...

    I have noticed that some folks tend to deceive themselves without it. Something falling to the floor makes it far more difficult to do this.
    "Mind own business"
    "Always cut cards"

  8. #37
    Member Array MLittle's Avatar
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    I know you've already gotten a lot of suggestions..... My recommendation differs from many posters here. If you are shooting right handed and your shots are going to the left I think you don't have ENOUGH finger on the trigger. In other words, you are pushing the muzzle to the left. Are you shooting using your fingertip? If so, try shooting from the first joint on your trigger finger. Also, what helps me is if I increase my grip with my weak hand....this also will provide more support and counteract the tendency of the muzzle to go left.

    Also, try some dryfiring at a mirror....say in a bathroom. Watch the muzzle very closely and see what it does when you press the trigger. You will probably see a small movement of the muzzle to the left. Try moving your finger further onto the trigger and see what happens. You want the muzzle to stay stationary when you fire....using a mirror can help you find out what you're doing wrong.

  9. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by pscipio03 View Post
    Okay, try this (I had the same problem):
    Low left means you may be slapping the trigger. The trigger of the Glock takes some getting used to. I had this problem and still do to some extent, but not anywhere near as bad.
    Because of the trigger, your support hand (left hand if you're right handed), is not holding the pistol enough to compensate for how much your middle and ring finger on your dominant are pulling down on your Glock. Mixed in with the angle of the grip, and you'll end up shooting low/left.
    I used the Ayoob Wedge, and it changed everything. Do a Google search for it.
    In addition, I shot AR-15's and 1911's a lot throughout my life, and ALWAYS put the meaty portion of my trigger finger before the first knuckle on the trigger. Don't do that with a Glock. Use the actual joint indention itself.
    So, try these two things and report back:
    1. Ayoob Wedge
    2. Use first joint, not meaty portion of index finger.
    Quote Originally Posted by MLittle View Post
    I know you've already gotten a lot of suggestions..... My recommendation differs from many posters here. If you are shooting right handed and your shots are going to the left I think you don't have ENOUGH finger on the trigger. In other words, you are pushing the muzzle to the left. Are you shooting using your fingertip? If so, try shooting from the first joint on your trigger finger. Also, what helps me is if I increase my grip with my weak hand....this also will provide more support and counteract the tendency of the muzzle to go left.

    Also, try some dryfiring at a mirror....say in a bathroom. Watch the muzzle very closely and see what it does when you press the trigger. You will probably see a small movement of the muzzle to the left. Try moving your finger further onto the trigger and see what happens. You want the muzzle to stay stationary when you fire....using a mirror can help you find out what you're doing wrong.
    That's two votes for trying the joint on the trigger. I will try that too! Thanks!
    Don't bring a knife to a gun fight...unless it's strapped to a gun.

  10. #39
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    You might be jerking the trigger:

    Ben

    Cogito, ergo armatum sum. I think, therefore I am armed. (Don Mann, The Modern Day Gunslinger; the ultimate handgun training manual)


  11. #40
    Distinguished Member Array lchamp's Avatar
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    I solved that problem with lots of dry fire with a laser. I could see the way i was pulling the trigger. It took changing where on my finger pad I was engaging the trigger.

  12. #41
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    Glock 19 - Low & Left - Suggestions?

    Larry Vickers talked about this on an episode of tac tv recently.

  13. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdC View Post
    I had the same problem (low and left) no matter what pistol I was shooting. Here is what solved it for me:

    1. Not enough finger on the trigger,so now my trigger finger is on almost to the joint;

    2. I was moving or clenching my three other fingers when pressing the trigger. Practiced moving the trigger finger (empty handed)while keeping the other three fingers perfectly still; and

    3. Tighter grip on the support hand and less tight on the firing hand.

    I think the overall effect was to improve the straight back trigger pull, while keeping everything else as stationary as possible.
    The above worked for me also.
    pilgrimshooter likes this.
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  14. #43
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    There are drills (DF) to help isolate the trigger finger and will expose what might be going on during live fire that may not be noticable during slow deliberate dry fire.

    Slack out...press

    If you can't do this deliberately without disturbing the sight, there is no use in going on to the drill.

  15. #44
    Ex Member Array pir8fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pilgrimshooter View Post
    I'd love to get some thoughts on why I am shooting my Glock 19 (Gen4) low and left (7pm).

    My instructor suggests it is recoil anticipation, and I believe that could be the case. However, I'd love to hear from those with experience as to what else it might be. I've read a lot of posts on this, so here are some variables to consider in your reply:
    1. I am right handed. I shoot with my dominant eye (left) closed.
    2. I have tried different ammo (grains, JHP, FMJ) and get the same general issue.
    3. If I shoot with just my dominant hand (one handed) I am much more dead center than two handed. Strange.
    4. I use the Weaver stance when shooting two-handed.
    5. Another strange anomaly. When aiming at a target straight on, I shoot low and left. When I actually aim at a target that is to the left of my stance, I tend to hit the target.
    6. Shooting my Bodyguard 380--with a much longer trigger pull--I do not have this issue.
    I'm going to continue range practice (about 400 rounds at this point) but wondered if it could be something else other than anticipation or getting used to the trigger.

    Thanks for your help!
    Low and left for a right handed shooter is usually a sign of jerking the trigger rather than squeezing it. It could also be a little bit of breaking your wrist down.

  16. #45
    Member Array pilgrimshooter's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone! I am hoping to get to the range tomorrow and will report back.
    Don't bring a knife to a gun fight...unless it's strapped to a gun.

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