Is it just me, or does decocking a chambered gun make you nervous?

This is a discussion on Is it just me, or does decocking a chambered gun make you nervous? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I'm always extremely focused when I'm manipulating the firearm in that situation. Depending on your gun, make sure you don't hold the trigger back the ...

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Thread: Is it just me, or does decocking a chambered gun make you nervous?

  1. #16
    Member Array Spovik's Avatar
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    I'm always extremely focused when I'm manipulating the firearm in that situation. Depending on your gun, make sure you don't hold the trigger back the whole time. That way if you do slip, your transfer bar will hopefully work as designed.

    As for actual decocking mechanisms, I've had good luck with them, but keep pointed in a safe direction.

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  3. #17
    Senior Member Array sensei2's Avatar
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    i have NEVER heard of a modern designed gun (50 years old or less), discharging when the decocking lever was used.

    most modern DA/SA handguns with hammers use some type of construction so that the hammer CANNOT contact the firing pin UNLESS the trigger is pulled. the default setting is 'hammer blocked'. this makes the gun safe in it were ever dropped on the hammer. using a decocker leaves this block or whatever, in place.

    on my Sig DA/SA handguns, the hammer literally CANNOT be pushed up against the firing pin if the trigger has not been pressed to the rear.

    IMO, pulling the trigger while trying to lower the hammer manually, is FAR more likely to result in a non-intentional discharge.

    nevertheless, like many others have stated, i always try to have my weapon pointed in a safe direction at all times, including when using the decocking lever on my Sigs.
    aus71383 and Snub44 like this.

  4. #18
    VIP Member Array rammerjammer's Avatar
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    The decocker on my Ruger P90 has never given me concern.
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  5. #19
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    I have never had an issue with any of my handguns that had a decocker. I've also never had an issue manually decocking. Always point the muzzle in a safe direction.

    I checked out an old CZ-52 once and tried the pencil test* with it, and it failed. They're supposed to be pretty notorious with that issue.

    * Place a pencil, eraser first, down the barrel of the unloaded handgun and press the trigger. If the pencil flies out the end, the decocker is not working.
    "Americans have the will to resist because you have weapons. If you don't have a gun, freedom of speech has no power." - Yoshimi Ishikawa

  6. #20
    Member Array tony1990's Avatar
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    No. Do it all the time.

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  7. #21
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    With the SIG firearms. Point the muzzle away from the cat and hit the decocker.

    Let the firearm decock using just the decocker. Do not ease the hammer down while you are using the decocker. Just let the decock do its job as intended. It does not need any help.
    I have decocked SIG pistols for many years and have never had an unintentional discharge.
    They work perfectly and if they didn't SIG would be long sued out of business by now.
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  8. #22
    Ex Member Array drinknshoot's Avatar
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    Just dont decock it pointed at anybody or yourself just for safety precautions Anyways..
    But without it being able to hit the firing spring theres no way..
    But It doesnt worry me..That is Until

    ONe day It all went wrong

    jk

  9. #23
    VIP Member Array sixgun's Avatar
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    If it has the decocking lever on it. It dosent bother me decockers were made to do just that.

  10. #24
    Ex Member Array hartlathers's Avatar
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    All my guns that have a decocker have a hammer block and are quite safe. When I am decocking one of my revolvers, that's a different issue altogether. I do pay special attention when that's going on.

  11. #25
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    Same as above.

    With a decocker, no. Keep it pointed in a safe direction though.

    With a revolver, m'little bit. Focus focus focus.

  12. #26
    Member Array billstaf's Avatar
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    After one very loud and messy in-house experience some years ago, I now make sure to decock very gently and always with the barrel pointed someplace safe. My wife still hasn't completely forgiven me for destroying her bathroom. At least nothing but some glass, some sheetrock, and a shower curtain got hurt.
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  13. #27
    Member Array JaySkiBum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    My one and only negligent discharge was while uncocking my .30-30. I will still uncock a hammer, I'm a lot more cautious while doing so. Decockers are no issue.
    This is my only experience with uncocking as well, but I haven't had a ND. I did get to hear the story of how my Dad almost put a hole in his Uncle's truck door one cold morning, though. I use the same gun, a somewhat vintage 1894. (~1964-65 model) Of course it doesn't have a decocker, so it requires special attention.

  14. #28
    Member Array nwbackpacker's Avatar
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    I am only NORMALLY concerned about decocking a chambered modern weapon with a dedicated decocking mechanism. My Sig P226 has a decocking lever for this reason and I do it using the same concern that I have in holding the gun prior to decocking. Safe direction, finger off the trigger, etc.

  15. #29
    Senior Member Array SCXDm9's Avatar
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    Re: Is it just me, or does decocking a chambered gun make you nervous?

    YES... and thats why I don't have one of those anymore.

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  16. #30
    Member Array Mjr_Fail's Avatar
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    I always point the gun in a safe direction when using the decocker. I believe most modern DA/SA guns still have a firing pin or hammer block that would require the trigger be pulled to disengage the block making the decocker completely safe. My Sig and CZ both leave the hammer in a half-cocked position. My P99 is striker fired and I have no worries about the decocking mechanism on it either. That's what the firing pin blocks are for.
    "Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." --Benjamin Franklin

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