Is it just me, or does decocking a chambered gun make you nervous?

This is a discussion on Is it just me, or does decocking a chambered gun make you nervous? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; My decocker instead of something blocking it.. It rotates completely out of the way....

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Thread: Is it just me, or does decocking a chambered gun make you nervous?

  1. #31
    Ex Member Array drinknshoot's Avatar
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    My decocker instead of something blocking it..
    It rotates completely out of the way.

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  3. #32
    VIP Member Array Ghost1958's Avatar
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    Always use a docker if the firearm has one. I trust them but always make sure its pointed in a safe direction like the ground or floor anyway. I dont think is possible for one to go off that way but being mechanical things can malfunction I suppose. Doesnt make me nervous though

  4. #33
    Distinguished Member Array BurgerBoy's Avatar
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    I use the decocker on my Bersa and have never had any problems with it.
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  5. #34
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    I don't have anything with a decocker. My wheel gun is DA only, and my 1911 of course doesn't have one. If I need to "decock", I do it on an empty chamber. Always carry it condition 1.
    I shoot with a pistol and a Canon. We must all hang together amigos, or we will all hang separately. NRA life member.

  6. #35
    Member Array WyoShooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdBro View Post
    Is it just me, or does decocking a chambered gun make you nervous?

    like it's going to accidentally go off.

    ever hear of this happening?
    Wow, does this bring back memories!

    Back around 1950, when I was about 9 or 10 years old and a big fan of cowboy movies, I took my dad's Winchester 1894, lever action 30-30 deer rifle and started playing with it in the kitchen. I loaded it up with ammo, I think it held 7 rounds, and rapidly worked the lever like a cowboy in a gunfight, ejecting all 7 rounds while aiming at the kitchen clock. When I thought the gun was empty, I put my thumb on the hammer and pulled the trigger intending to slowly and gently lower the hammer to an uncocked position. The hammer slipped and hit the firing pin with the loudest snap I ever heard.

    Fortunately, I had counted correctly and the chamber was empty, but I still remember the chill I felt as I stood there imagining how I would have explained the hole in the kitchen floor if there had been a round in the chamber.

    To this day the only way I decock my 1911 or any firearm with an exposed hammer, is by placing my left thumb between the hammer and the firing pin while I start to lower the hammer with my right thumb. I'd rather risk a blood blister on my thumb rather than have to explain a hole where one didn't belong.

    Ed
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  7. #36
    VIP Member Array 10thmtn's Avatar
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    I'm more concerned about folks forgetting to de-cock when they go to holster the pistol, especially when under stress. One reason I do not like DA/SA pistols.
    The more good folks carry guns, the fewer shots the crazies can get off.
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  8. #37
    New Member Array johnab's Avatar
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    I always point my gun in a safe direction...

  9. #38
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    Is it just me, or does decocking a chambered gun make you nervous?

    Never uncock my 1911 on a chambered round, my S910 S&W in the other hand has a decocker... I have no qualms using it...
    "The world is filled with violence. Because criminals carry guns, we decent law-abiding citizens should also have guns. Otherwise they will win and the decent people will lose."

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  10. #39
    Senior Member Array theskunk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mano3 View Post
    I keep the weapon pointed in a safe direction when de-cocking.
    Thats the key to everything with a gun

  11. #40
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    I know not everyone agree's with this logic, but it's always good to understand how your particular guns function internally. How the gun locks up, trigger linkage, sear, hammer blocks, etc. There are many good animated function videos available on YouTube for a variety of weapons.

    I don't think it's necessary to know how to completely disassemble every single part of your guns. Not everyone wants to be a gunsmith or mess with their guns in such detail, however understanding how it functions internally is important.

    If you have taken the time to learn about how your gun (which has a decocker) functions inside, you'll understand it's likely not even physically possible to fire the chambered round when using the decocker (unless you are simultaneously pulling the trigger). That should relieve most people's apprehension.

    The other major factor is abiding by the 4 Cardinal Rules of Gun Safety at all times. Which means that your finger is going to be off the trigger until you are bringing your gun on target and are prepared to fire... Always keeping the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, as well as, know what your backstop is when pointing the weapon in any direction.
    -Bark'n
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  12. #41
    VIP Member Array nedrgr21's Avatar
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    depends on who's doing it - I'm assuming you're talking about a gun without a decocker.


    If JMB didn't put it on his 1911, then by God. you don't need it .
    Last edited by nedrgr21; January 23rd, 2013 at 09:16 AM.

  13. #42
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    If the gun has a de-cocker it doesn't bother me. If no de-cocker, it doesn't make me nervous, just ultra careful. If I have to do it, I keep a finger between the hammer and firing pin, plus, as soon as the hammer starts forward I remove my finger from the trigger. Is it fool proof? NO But few things in life are.
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  14. #43
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    Ditto for MIKE1956.

  15. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdBro View Post
    Is it just me, or does decocking a chambered gun make you nervous?
    Sure, it keeps me on my toes, helping me to always realize the four basic safety guidelines have their place. I've generally preferred DA/SA with decockers, or DAO. My first pistol was a DA/SA/decocker. Never had an issue with the decocking failing. Also practice decocking manually (without the decocker mechanism). Have heard of some instances of decocking failing, though uncertain how much of this is simply legend.

    Have since done manual decocking on hammered revolvers, other hammered semi-auto pistols, my 1894-style rifles. No errors, yet. But because of the risk, I always try to do it while observing the guns safety/handling guidelines, 'cause you never know if the hammer will slip or the mechanical decocker mechanism will fail. I'd prefer to never find out the hard way.
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  16. #45
    Distinguished Member Array bigmacque's Avatar
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    I'd be a liar if I said that decocking did not make me nervous, it always does, even after practicing / testing it at the range. My HK .45 has a decocker and I use it all the time, because the gun is DA/SA and once a round is in the chamber is hot anytime -- just takes a longer trigger pull with the hammer decocked.

    I do decock my Springfield .45, the Micro Compact GI.45, and I noticed that someone earlier in this thread stated that doing so with grip safety handgun is a bit nerve-wracking. That step also makes me nervous, but again with testing and practice - and careful pointing of the muzzle while doing so - I'm comfortable and very careful with doing it. But it does take a heightened awareness of safety and thus the nerves are at prime state.
    I'm in favor of gun control -- I think every citizen should have control of a gun.
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