Colorado Bill to allow felons to have firearms??

This is a discussion on Colorado Bill to allow felons to have firearms?? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Originally Posted by Rcher Terrific, now they are trying to claim there's a difference between bad criminals and good criminals. A felon is a felon. ...

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 67
Like Tree84Likes

Thread: Colorado Bill to allow felons to have firearms??

  1. #16
    Member Array Daddydon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    395
    Quote Originally Posted by Rcher View Post
    Terrific, now they are trying to claim there's a difference between bad criminals and good criminals. A felon is a felon. You can put lipstick on a pig but at the end of the day it's still a pig.
    A polished turd is still a turd

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #17
    Ex Member Array drinknshoot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Bggest Little City in the World
    Posts
    303
    Ur all perfect angels
    and never slipt up in your life..at all..
    Your perfectly mentally balanced and practice mindfulness,and treat others and situations perfectly as they should.
    You're just one that was'nt caught in the mix.

    and EVERY felon is a no good and should never have rights again.
    no
    It couldve been something stupid and minor or one small mistake..It could easily be you
    And in our legislation whatever itmay be is "labeled" a Felony.Which some people just decided.Just like the 10 round mag n over being high
    You could've yelled at someone after a big verbal argument..I could list a hundred things,and it could work out to your disadvantage..
    Just saying
    you'll probaly never understand
    n very judgemental..You go off of what you hear n dont look at it all around, or see things from the other side..And you dont know what really happened with Every person
    anyways up up n away

    Not defending all felons..
    Cause Im for protecting our children and family.And hardworking people who work either their own business or any job we can find and not taking the easy way out..Sticking it out like grown ups, not cheatin the system and screwing everyone else whos worked so hard..
    Plus just obnoxious,ignorant,stupid,no good people...
    Which the majority are..
    Im not looking into this but if the stipulations were right,and under the right circumstances it could be ok..For Some people...
    Im sure there not just gonna let loose n give all felons gun rights..thats not very practical..especially if they have previous violent charges or something..

  4. #18
    Member Array discoboxer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    315
    I agree that some exceptions should be made, especially in the circumstance of "young and dumb" crimes and non-violent crimes.......after a reasonable duration that the individual has proved not to continue such crimes.

    Good people make mistakes too. It's unfortunate that in today's society, often one cannot enter the court innocent until proven otherwise and cannot leave clear after serving their time.
    kerberos likes this.
    “There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.”
    ― Albert Einstein

  5. #19
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    texas
    Posts
    15,095
    Sometimes the only difference between a felony and a misdemeanor is the amount,up to certain amounts of Marijuana in most states is a misdemeanor,you go one gram over that amount it's a felony,lets say you shoplifted an item being a dipstick kid if it was under X amount it's a misdemeanor,over a certain amount it's a felony.I know a lot of people that took the wrong path years ago and were either alcoholics or addicts,today after getting clean and sober no longer break the law and work on changing their lives around.
    If It was up to the Anti-gunners they would try to get you revoked from having a gun for a traffic ticket.
    Doghandler, msgt/ret and kerberos like this.
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
    --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington , DC .

  6. #20
    Senior Member Array stanislaskasava's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    U.S.
    Posts
    1,104
    I think this is a good idea and here's the reason why: We need to keep criminals in prison until they can be trusted amongst society. If we think that they shouldn't have a gun, THAT'S A PRETTY GOOD CLUE that they should still be in prison.

    Society has tried to have it both ways for far too long. Wishy-washy, namby-pamby isn't working. Allowing felons to have their gun rights forces us to be honest with ourselves when we decide to release them back into the public. This will benefit everyone.

  7. #21
    VIP Member Array pittypat21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,485
    Quote Originally Posted by Crashoften View Post
    I may be mistaken but I thought there already was a way for past felons to petition the courts to regain they're rights including they're voting and firearms rights?
    I think that depends on the state. I could be wrong. I do know that some states allow felons to purchase/after X number of years have passed from their release date (or other stipulations such as parole).
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everyone you meet."
    -General James Mattis, USMC

  8. #22
    Member Array Daddydon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    395
    The law is the law, plain and simple...if there is no consequence for our actions, what motive is there to be a law abiding citizen. If you can't do the time, don't do the crime

  9. #23
    Member Array Rivers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    434
    I very much agree with the concept of what this legislator is trying to do. Actually knowing a few felons who did their crimes decades ago, did the time and have completely reformed and become very decent parents and taxpayers, there are a few good reasons why that idea has merit. For example, in this wonderful state of CA where carrying a handgun without a permit can be charged as a felony (even if you have a spotless record before), it's all to easy to become a felon. Or what about that marijuana possession bust in 1966, charged as a felony then but now less than a misdemeanor. By allowing CERTAIN felonies to be reduced or erased, here are some potential benefits:
    1) more motivation in prison to rehabilitate, thereby reducing the occupancy, likelihood of trouble while incarcerated, and drain on public resources.
    2) without a felony record, higher income professions are possible, thus more income tax to the state. (Doctor, nurse, engineer, pharmacist, etc. cannot have felonies and practice those professions. If a medical doctor got a felony gun bust, say for an AR15 without a bullet button, he can kiss off 12 years of medical school and be no longer able to practice medicine. And we need more MD's in the immediate future.)
    3) like a parole board, have qualifying felons petition a state board of retired judges, etc. for relief, and require the felon to prove that full rehabilitation has happened.
    4) wait a period of at least three years or the term of sentence, after release, before any petition is allowed.
    5) having a clean record reduces the likelihood of repeating criminal activity.

    There are valid reasons why the old system doesn't work like intended. We really should take a fresh look at how the system actually undermines its own goal of rehabilitating. When someone screws up, they do the time. But when that's done, in CERTAIN cases, that crime should not haunt them the rest of their lives. The people this would affect are not only harmless but they would have proven they are assets to their communities.

    FWIW, I'm very conservative politically.

  10. #24
    Member Array Daddydon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    395
    Quote Originally Posted by Rivers View Post
    I very much agree with the concept of what this legislator is trying to do. Actually knowing a few felons who did their crimes decades ago, did the time and have completely reformed and become very decent parents and taxpayers, there are a few good reasons why that idea has merit. For example, in this wonderful state of CA where carrying a handgun without a permit can be charged as a felony (even if you have a spotless record before), it's all to easy to become a felon. Or what about that marijuana possession bust in 1966, charged as a felony then but now less than a misdemeanor. By allowing CERTAIN felonies to be reduced or erased, here are some potential benefits:
    1) more motivation in prison to rehabilitate, thereby reducing the occupancy, likelihood of trouble while incarcerated, and drain on public resources.
    2) without a felony record, higher income professions are possible, thus more income tax to the state. (Doctor, nurse, engineer, pharmacist, etc. cannot have felonies and practice those professions. If a medical doctor got a felony gun bust, say for an AR15 without a bullet button, he can kiss off 12 years of medical school and be no longer able to practice medicine. And we need more MD's in the immediate future.)
    3) like a parole board, have qualifying felons petition a state board of retired judges, etc. for relief, and require the felon to prove that full rehabilitation has happened.
    4) wait a period of at least three years or the term of sentence, after release, before any petition is allowed.
    5) having a clean record reduces the likelihood of repeating criminal activity.

    There are valid reasons why the old system doesn't work like intended. We really should take a fresh look at how the system actually undermines its own goal of rehabilitating. When someone screws up, they do the time. But when that's done, in CERTAIN cases, that crime should not haunt them the rest of their lives. The people this would affect are not only harmless but they would have proven they are assets to their communities.

    FWIW, I'm very conservative politically.
    Okay, yeah, perhaps. But that's the problem, your thinking about limitations. If they do this, there won't be a limit. I agree with you but unless there is proof in more recoveries than repeat offenses, I don't think it's too wise

  11. #25
    Member Array Daddydon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    395
    Besides, if you lax the laws, why bother worrying about whether something is wrong or not...you will get your way eventually

  12. #26
    Distinguished Member Array GlassWolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    1,747
    I don't actually have a problem with some felons being able to have firearms again. I had a friend who was a convicted felon from the age of 16, because he used someone else's credit card once, and they reported him not to the police, but the secret service, so it was a federal charge. He eventually had it expunged, but my point is not all felonies are violent acts, and not all felons are the same. Should every person caught for one mistake in their life, perhaps decades ago, be kept from their Constitutional Rights till the day they die, without any due consideration? This is exactly the problem with one-size-fits-all laws, and zero tolerance policies.
    Last edited by GlassWolf; January 24th, 2013 at 01:58 AM.
    kerberos likes this.
    I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  13. #27
    Distinguished Member Array Exacto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,489
    That's just great. A liar will steal and a thief will kill. Congratulations idiots, youv'e found a new level of stupid.
    dukalmighty likes this.
    Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunder bolt...... Sun Tzu.

    The supreme art of war is to defeat the enemy without fighting........ Sun Tzu.

  14. #28
    Member Array Rivers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    434
    Quote Originally Posted by Daddydon View Post
    Besides, if you lax the laws, why bother worrying about whether something is wrong or not...you will get your way eventually
    Not laxing the laws, just opening an avenue to become a full member of society again. Whatever sentence was decided, the person had to complete that term, then wait for a set period before applying for relief.

    What I didn't note in my earlier post was the example of a quality worker, say a machinist, whose employer gains a defense dept. contract that requires security clearance for the employees. That old felony for marijuana, etc. will cost that machinist his job. So now you have an ex-felon who is unemployed. Not the goal.

    Another point is that with the possibility of restoring one's record and building a good life, a felon doing time will be less interested in gangs, either inside or once released. Gangs prey on their members not being accepted into society. That felony record plays right into the gang's hand.

    We're not talking about murderers being whitewashed into angels. Not even close. And getting relief from certain felony convictions would require exceptional efforts by the felon to demonstrate to the state that he/she is an asset to the community, not just harmless, but an asset.

  15. #29
    Member Array Rivers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    434
    Quote Originally Posted by Daddydon View Post
    Besides, if you lax the laws, why bother worrying about whether something is wrong or not...you will get your way eventually
    Not laxing the laws, just opening an avenue to become a full member of society again. Whatever sentence was decided, the person had to complete that term, then wait for a set period before applying for relief.

    What I didn't note in my earlier post was the example of a quality worker, say a machinist, whose employer gains a defense dept. contract that requires security clearance for the employees. That old felony for marijuana, etc. will cost that machinist his job. So now you have an ex-felon who is unemployed. Not the goal.

    Another point is that with the possibility of restoring one's record and building a good life, a felon doing time will be less interested in gangs, either inside or once released. Gangs prey on their members not being accepted into society. That felony record plays right into the gang's hand.

    We're not talking about murderers being whitewashed into angels. Not even close. And getting relief from certain felony convictions would require exceptional efforts by the felon to demonstrate to the state that he/she is an asset to the community, not just harmless, but an asset.

  16. #30
    Senior Member Array kerberos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    742
    Friend of mine worked for a tow service when he was younger...

    Some golf clubs came up missing from the trunk of the vehicle when the owner picked it up...

    He's now a felon.

    This was 12 years ago and he has since married and has a newborn son...

    He (according to some) should not have the right to defend himself, his wife, or newborn son because of some missing golf clubs.

    Gimme a break.

    Consider some of the stupid crap you did when you were 16 to 25...

    tcox4freedom likes this.
    "Death is lighter than a feather, but Duty is heavier than a mountain" Robert Jordan
    USMC veteran
    Glock 19 Gen 4
    Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

colorado civil rights restoration

,
colorado congress woman and felony gun rights
,

colorado felon gun bill

,

colorado felon gun rights

,
colorado nonviolent felons restored gun rights
,

colorado restoration of gun rights

,
gun rights restored in colorado
,

how to get gun rights restored in colorado

,
oklahoma bill for felons to get gun rights back
,

restoration of gun rights colorado

,

restoration of gun rights in colorado

,

restore gun rights colorado

Click on a term to search for related topics.