Colorado Bill to allow felons to have firearms?? - Page 4

Colorado Bill to allow felons to have firearms??

This is a discussion on Colorado Bill to allow felons to have firearms?? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; What about this? Haynes v. United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia...

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Thread: Colorado Bill to allow felons to have firearms??

  1. #46
    Member Array pacman's Avatar
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  2. #47
    New Member Array Sera63's Avatar
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    Originally posted by pacman
    What about this? Haynes v. United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    While the Supreme Court's decision may have been correct per the 5th Amendment; the individual did break the law. As such, he should have done time for illegally possessing a firearm...technicalities notwithstanding. just my .02

  3. #48
    VIP Member Array SmokinFool's Avatar
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    My take on it is that if you've proven you can't follow the law, especially to the point of committing a felony, then you have no business owning a firearm. No difference to me if it's a white collar crime or a violent crime. A felony is a felony.

  4. #49
    Member Array scorpion12's Avatar
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    I'm not opposed to this

    I personally feel that, once a person has served their debt to society, if they're to be trusted in civilized society again, they should most likely have their rights restored. Otherwose, what's the point of releasing them from prison? If they cannot be trusted, then do not release them.

    We are all seeing the erosion of rights, the ratcheting up of laws, and how much easier it is to become a felon now than it was 20 or 30 years ago... so anyone that's been accused and convicted of a felony, whether dead to rights or falsely accused, should be subject to the loss of their rights forever?

    If someone that's been released form prison has shown that they're once again a productive member of society and is continually working towards bettering their selves, then we as a society should be lenient and forgive them. Grant them their rights back... otherwise, don't release them from incarceration.

  5. #50
    Distinguished Member Array GlassWolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbguy29577 View Post
    Illegal activity, no matter how "white collar" is still done by untrustworthy, dishonest people. You go to prison, you loose your rights. Too bad. You had a choice. You gambled and lost. Having a gun and the permit to conceal is an important indicator or your character.
    So you've never downloaded a song, or a movie, or driven over the speed limit? I've seen those charges amount to a felony before. The point is that once a felon has served his time, he's served his time. His basic human and civil rights should not be stripped for life once he's released from his penal term. If that's your goal, then just sentene the person to LW/oP, or have him executed. Once the sentence is served, that should be the end of it. Considering our penal system is based on rehabilitation and not punishment, it still seems odd that we don't treat the rehabilitated as exactly that.

    It's yet another example of government hypocrisy, just like gun-control laws. Tyranny by any other name.
    ccw9mm, msgt/ret and kerberos like this.
    I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  6. #51
    VIP Member Array Ghost1958's Avatar
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    After thinking on this just a bit we all missed the glaring truth including me because I concentrated on the question specifially.

    It wont make a difference one way or the other. A violent felon if released before he is to old and crippled will simply get a gun as all criminals do regardless if the law says he can or not and likely do the same violent crimes as before until he is killed by a would be victim, the state or jailed for life.
    In any practical terms this whole legislation and discussion is a moot point.
    91wm6 likes this.

  7. #52
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    My opinion is that if a person is too dangerous to own a firearm then they should still be locked up. If you did the crime, paid with the time and are now free, you should have all the rights under the Constitution that the rest of us enjoy.
    I haven’t heard any of the journalists who volunteered to be waterboarded asking to have their fingernails wrenched out with pliers, or electrodes attached to their genitals.

  8. #53
    Member Array BobbyLee's Avatar
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    I would not be opposed to this after they have served their sentence and after parole. I believe that our prison system is not in the business of rehabilitation but just keeping the bad guys locked away. But I do know there are some that are changed by their prison/jail experience.

  9. #54
    Senior Member Array Jemsaal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlassWolf View Post
    It's yet another example of government hypocrisy, just like gun-control laws. Tyranny by any other name.
    It is not tyranny however, because the rights have been removed by due process in accordance with established laws before the crime was committed. In the same way that the right to bear arms is no longer available to the felon, in many states the right to vote is no longer available to the felon either. Some here are saying, "But if he has paid his debt . . ." I understand that, but part of paying the debt, is losing the right to vote or bear arms.

    I'm also for the process of restoring rights in the future. If a felon who has served his time has shown over a number of years that he is rehabbed, then let him submit to the court a petition to restore rights.

    But losing rights to due process is not tyranny.

  10. #55
    Senior Member Array GeorgiaDawg's Avatar
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    Why are we picking on the 2nd Amendment when it comes to rights that you can take away from a convicted felon? Why not take away their right to free speech, religion, or exempt them from needing a warrant to search or seize their property?

    I repeat - if justice has been satisfied and the convict is released from prison, they should be given back their basic rights. If we are still worried about them exercising their rights appropriately, then perhaps we either have to live with it, or justice wasn't really served and we need to revamp the justice system.
    kerberos likes this.
    "For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast." - Ephesians 2:8-9

    “The purpose of the law is not to prevent a future offense, but to punish the one actually committed” - Ayn Rand

  11. #56
    Senior Member Array CanuckQue's Avatar
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    I think that after stealing millions of dollars from hundreds of people, you might have a greater need for self-defense than the average shmuck!
    The only acceptable long-term outcome is to find a cure. It's an actual solution, requiring forward-thinking efforts.

    Until then, we're just arguing about who's pushing who.


  12. #57
    Distinguished Member Array tcox4freedom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerberos View Post
    Friend of mine worked for a tow service when he was younger...

    Some golf clubs came up missing from the trunk of the vehicle when the owner picked it up...

    He's now a felon.

    This was 12 years ago and he has since married and has a newborn son...

    He (according to some) should not have the right to defend himself, his wife, or newborn son because of some missing golf clubs.

    Gimme a break.

    Consider some of the stupid crap you did when you were 16 to 25...

    AND---

    Consider how some people in our gooberment want to increase some misdemeanors such as (not noticing a "gun free zone" sign) into a felony.


    Possible scenario-
    You go to a shopping mall and enter a store not seeing a gun buster sign, then you have to protect yourself against a BG. You are now a "felon" and lose all gun rights for the rest of your life because you protected yourself. But, you committed a felony in the process. (You are a felon so do you still agree that all felons should lose their gun rights?)

    My view is, "If you do the crime, you do the time". BUT!!!!

    Once the government feels it is safe for yu to walk the streets again, your rights should be restored.


    -

  13. #58
    Member Array 91wm6's Avatar
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    I would be willing to bet my left uh kidney, that 9/10 of the members on this forum have been guilty of some sort of felony, at some time in their life. Any one of us AR 15 owners are just one trigger group malfunction away from committing a felony every time we go to the range. It's about time to inject some common sense back into the judicial system...
    GlassWolf and tcox4freedom like this.

  14. #59
    Distinguished Member Array GlassWolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jemsaal View Post
    It is not tyranny however, because the rights have been removed by due process in accordance with established laws before the crime was committed. In the same way that the right to bear arms is no longer available to the felon, in many states the right to vote is no longer available to the felon either. Some here are saying, "But if he has paid his debt . . ." I understand that, but part of paying the debt, is losing the right to vote or bear arms.

    I'm also for the process of restoring rights in the future. If a felon who has served his time has shown over a number of years that he is rehabbed, then let him submit to the court a petition to restore rights.

    But losing rights to due process is not tyranny.
    It is tyranny in that a person's basic rights are being taken away after having served their sentence and returned to society, not to mention that if a member of the government committed the same crime, they would most likely get a slap on the wrist and let off the hook.
    ccw9mm likes this.
    I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  15. #60
    Member Array co9mil's Avatar
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    I thought prison was a time for law breakers to be rehabilitated, if they haven't been rehabilitated and can't be trusted to obey they law they shouldn't be let out. If they have been rehabilitated and they aren't a violent offender why shouldn't their rights be restored?
    tcox4freedom likes this.

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