When do you ask someone to leave the range?

When do you ask someone to leave the range?

This is a discussion on When do you ask someone to leave the range? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I wasn't sure where to post this and it is admittedly not a "defensive carry" issue per se. But since we all spend time at ...

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Thread: When do you ask someone to leave the range?

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    Senior Member Array KoriBustard's Avatar
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    When do you ask someone to leave the range?

    I wasn't sure where to post this and it is admittedly not a "defensive carry" issue per se. But since we all spend time at the shooting range I thought I'd offer this. I had a situation where a young man who seemed rather serious and intense committed a number of range violations, each time I spoke very politely to him pointing out the infraction. In order of infraction he a) began to step away from the firing line with a loaded round, b) loaded his firearm before moving to the firing line, c) held his firearm in the safe zone with the action closed, d) and muzzled the safe area with his firearm while locked and loaded. Each offense was simply not paying attention. At the last infraction I gave him a rather stern rebuke, but now I think I should have removed him from the range at "b" if not "a."

    Opinions? Yeah, I know, I screwed up trying to be too nice a guy.
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    Ex Member Array SayVandelay's Avatar
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    I started taking my brother in law shooting. Talked to him about safety before we left. At the range he did a couple of little stupid things. But then he turned around to sit on the bench and reload his magazines, he walked to the bench holding the gun, bad enough, but he was holding it with his pinky finger, which was inside the trigger guard. I suggested we leave, and then told him how stupid the things he was doing are

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    VIP Member Array nedrgr21's Avatar
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    First, what are/are there official range rules or are those your rules
    Second, if those are the official range rules, do you have that authority? If those are your rules, it's your choice to stay and politely express your concern or leave.
    After b I would explain all the rules, including the why's of the rules. I've found when you explain it as "we have numerous redundant safety rules so that a person would have to break at least 2 or 3 before anyone was in real danger of being hurt". That line has been a good attention getter for me in the past.
    If you do have the authority, up to a point, the "line" depends on the person's attitude.
    At d, it's definitely time to have a serious chat with the person and just say, hey, your head really isn't in the game today, we'd appreciate it if you would come back another time when you're not so distracted.

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    VIP Member Array xXxplosive's Avatar
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    A bullet has no conscience.............you were too nice........remove him for everyone's safety.


    PS...It was so cold today, I actually saw a Democrat with his hands in his own pockets.....

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    Range safety falls into the "priesthood of all believers" category. Range officers can't be everywhere at every moment seeing every unsafe action, so it's up to all of us to look out for everyone's safety. If your range has ROs, then alert one ASAP to this guy's unsafe behaviors. If no ROs, then either politely ask Mr. Unsafe to stand down, or leave, or you leave after alerting others.
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    Ex Member Array gregnsc's Avatar
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    The range i go to,if he had stepped away from the firing line with a loaded round,they would say something to him.I don't think,they would ask him two times.I don't blame them.

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    You guys lost me on the loaded round. What are you talking about?
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    VIP Member Array goldshellback's Avatar
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    After politly, but sternly, discussing with him what he's doing wrong then it's time to involve the RSO. Together you might be able to teach him the err of his ways &/or ask him to leave. If not that, I'd go. Stupid hurts.
    "Just getting a concealed carry permit means you haven't commited a crime yet. CCP holders commit crimes." Daniel Vice, senior attorney for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, quoted on Fox & Friends, 8 Jul, 2008

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    Senior Member Array KoriBustard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nedrgr21 View Post
    First, what are/are there official range rules or are those your rules
    Second, if those are the official range rules, do you have that authority? If those are your rules, it's your choice to stay and politely express your concern or leave.
    After b I would explain all the rules, including the why's of the rules. I've found when you explain it as "we have numerous redundant safety rules so that a person would have to break at least 2 or 3 before anyone was in real danger of being hurt". That line has been a good attention getter for me in the past.
    If you do have the authority, up to a point, the "line" depends on the person's attitude.
    At d, it's definitely time to have a serious chat with the person and just say, hey, your head really isn't in the game today, we'd appreciate it if you would come back another time when you're not so distracted.
    What makes this worse, is that I am an NRA certified Range Safety Officer (RSO) and I serve in that capacity at this range (not paid, just a member). Every violation was against the generally accepted rules of range safety. However, you're right, "rules" vary from range to range. However, I can't imagine any range that would tolerated loaded firearms in a safe area (that's why it's called the "safe" area). All members are allowed to (and in fact encouraged to) politely point out violations and if needed report those violations to the club leadership. In my case, I am fully authorized by the club to remove someone from the range. My issue here was that until the last violation, I felt that a polite correction was needed...I'm just second guessing myself that I had a person commit at least 4 (there were others more minor) infractions. For my safety and others, I believe I should have instructed him to unload his firearm, make safe, store his firearms, leave the range and welcome him to come back another day. On a good note, he shot with us on Sunday and was perfectly safe and conscientious of his firearm (I watched him like a hawk). Maybe this is a case of "no harm no foul" but it I was responsible for range safety on that day.
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    Distinguished Member Array Tally XD's Avatar
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    Unless you are a range officer it might be better not to try to make someone leave the range, but rather, alert a range or safety officer. If you feel that unsafe it might be best you yourself leave instead of making someone you don't know, that is holding a loaded weapon, mad at you.

    EDIT: Sorry, I posted this as you were posting above.
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    Senior Member Array KoriBustard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldshellback View Post
    After politly, but sternly, discussing with him what he's doing wrong then it's time to involve the RSO. Together you might be able to teach him the err of his ways &/or ask him to leave. If not that, I'd go. Stupid hurts.
    The point is...I am the RSO.
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    Member Array keboostman's Avatar
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    My view is that there should be zero tolerance for safety issues at the range. Imagine how you would feel if "being polite" resulted in an accident. I can see one strike for a minor violation, but after that it's out.

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    Distinguished Member Array Exacto's Avatar
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    I'm not sure where your coming from. You say "I think I should have removed him" which leads me to think it is your range,your rules?
    If it was, I believe that once you are briefed on the rules,there is a zero tolerance for serious safety violations. Sweeping the safe area with a loaded gun would be grounds for removal. Handling the gun in the safe zone,grounds for removal. Loadind and or handling the gun away from the firing line, outa here.If you are both at a range open to the public,your options are limited. You can tell the RO if their is one. Report it to the manager. and if no one does anything, you would be wise to leave yourself. Trying to remove him yourself from a public range is too risky. He could be a nut job ready to go off.
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    VIP Member Array Snub44's Avatar
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    ...mercy's a difficult thing...everybody appreciates it when it's extended to them...yet some resent it when it's extended to others...
    ...hard part is when you're in authority and have to dispense it...or not...it's your decision and you bear the responsibility for the outcome...based on his return trip...I'd say the mercy was appreciated...and justified...

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    Senior Member Array KoriBustard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exacto View Post
    I'm not sure where your coming from. You say "I think I should have removed him" which leads me to think it is your range,your rules?
    If it was, I believe that once you are briefed on the rules,there is a zero tolerance for serious safety violations. Sweeping the safe area with a loaded gun would be grounds for removal. Handling the gun in the safe zone,grounds for removal. Loadind and or handling the gun away from the firing line, outa here.If you are both at a range open to the public,your options are limited. You can tell the RO if their is one. Report it to the manager. and if no one does anything, you would be wise to leave yourself. Trying to remove him yourself from a public range is too risky. He could be a nut job ready to go off.
    I agree. Like I said earlier, I am the RSO. The first infraction was when he "began" but did not step off the range. I caught him, made the correction before he left the firing line. The problem I faced was that until the last infraction (sweeping the safe area), I'd stopped him. But all of your points are well-taken and I should have removed him immediately. I guess I knew the right answer all along...maybe this is just a public mea culpa.
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