Pop and no kick with reloads today

Pop and no kick with reloads today

This is a discussion on Pop and no kick with reloads today within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; A coworker of mine offered me 100 reloaded 9mm rounds for $15. Considering ammo prices, this is a pretty good deal. First 30 rounds through ...

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  1. #1
    Member Array stevenshizzle's Avatar
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    Pop and no kick with reloads today

    A coworker of mine offered me 100 reloaded 9mm rounds for $15. Considering ammo prices, this is a pretty good deal.

    First 30 rounds through my Glock 19 fired with what I thought was a failure to extract. I am not too much of an experienced shooter, so I was not aware that a pop and no kick occured. If I noticed it, I chalked it up to simply inconsistency in powder loads. Now here's the problem and here's why I'm upset with myself. After this, I went through tigger pull, no fire, rack slide, burnt casing. Then, trigger pull followed by enormous recoil. So at this point I thought this was a pretty high powered load. However, I also noticed the slide did not return to battery. Cycled the slide and another failure to return to battery.

    I field stripped the handgun and found a piece of lead was lodged in the barrel. After seeking assistance, turns out that big kick was probably the recoil that occurred once I tried to fire again. I am upset because I am embarrassed at my failure to identify such a potentially dangerous situation.

    My new rules are: field strip after any notable malfunction or inconsistency; no more reloads. The barrel appears to be in good condition. The range stated no warping or apparent damage - I was lucky. I'm still upset and embarrassed and hope to get smart enough to keep this from ever happening again.

    Thoughts, comments, questions?


  2. #2
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    Personally I'd be tempted to get the pistol checked out by Glock or someone else that can really verify that you have no stress fractures that you just can't see. A squib can cause major damage and lead to a seriously dangerous condition (if it doesn't blow everything apart on the follow up round). I don't think that it would be safe to just assume that everything is fine simply because it looks OK to the naked eye.

    Also, yes, avoid reloads unless you are the one doing them.
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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Yeah, don't use anyone else's handloads...alot of people think they know what their doing, when they don't have a clue.
    Ignorance is a long way from stupid, but left unchecked, can get there real fast.

  4. #4
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    Expensive lesson to learn. Hope you find out your gun is sound and doesn't need expensive parts/replacement.
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  5. #5
    Member Array stevenshizzle's Avatar
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    I guess the right thing to do is to put in a call to Glock to see if they can inspect the bore of my barrel? Is this something that gunsmiths can do?

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    Not sure. I'd be careful with Glock though. They void warranties for shooting reloads so you'd need to tread carefully there.
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  7. #7
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    Your friend needs to learn more about handloading. You are very lucky your gun didn't explode. That could have been bad for you and those standing close. You learned a valuable lesson. Hopefully your gun is okay, but I wouldn't be surprised if you didn't put a bulge in your barrel. Let's hope not. Good luck

  8. #8
    Member Array stevenshizzle's Avatar
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    @Str8upguy -- the barrel looks fine when held up to a light.

    @ TX expat -- you've got me a bit worried. I don't want to void my warranty, but I'm not sure about the condition of my barrel at a "microscopic" level. I'm wondering if it's an "all or nothing" type thing where if it was going to blow up it would have done it in the first place. Or, is this a situation where every time I send a round through the barrel, it will get weaker and weaker because of what's happened.

    I'm tempted to just say screw it and buy a new barrel. This whole thing has got me sick to my stomach

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenshizzle View Post
    @Str8upguy -- the barrel looks fine when held up to a light.

    @ TX expat -- you've got me a bit worried. I don't want to void my warranty, but I'm not sure about the condition of my barrel at a "microscopic" level. I'm wondering if it's an "all or nothing" type thing where if it was going to blow up it would have done it in the first place. Or, is this a situation where every time I send a round through the barrel, it will get weaker and weaker because of what's happened.

    I'm tempted to just say screw it and buy a new barrel. This whole thing has got me sick to my stomach
    I'm sorry, I wish I knew more about this to give you some solid advice. I do know that Glock frowns on reloads and I've heard that you just don't want to tell them that you ever shoot anything other than factory ammo. Obviously Glocks are at no more risk from reloads than any firearm; and I shoot nothing but reloads in my Glocks!

    Maybe someone will come along in here that's actually dealt with this firsthand, because I can only make educated guesses. If you google squib rounds, you'll see all sorts of pictures of barrels with various levels of damage. I would assume that a barrel could suffer just enough damage to weaken it, which could cause a failure at a later time, after it's had the stress of additional firings. Sorry I can't give you any better directions on what you should do. It may be perfectly OK, but I know I would want to know that; not just think I know.

    Also, were you shooting lead bullets? There are a lot of folks that say never to shoot lead through the Glocks because of the polygonal rifling. It can cause issues because the leading builds up faster in that rifling
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  10. #10
    Member Array stevenshizzle's Avatar
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    You're a good man, thanks for your honesty. I'll stand in a holding pattern to see what general consensus is. I know I want to be able to trust my handgun to save my life, not to take it ;)

    If $135 for a new barrel is the cost of this lesson, then so be it. This is also my home SD weapon. The money is worth the peace of mind if that's what it takes.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenshizzle View Post
    You're a good man, thanks for your honesty. I'll stand in a holding pattern to see what general consensus is. I know I want to be able to trust my handgun to save my life, not to take it ;)

    If $135 for a new barrel is the cost of this lesson, then so be it. This is also my home SD weapon. The money is worth the peace of mind if that's what it takes.
    One other thing you might want to consider is heading over to GlockTalk and asking everyone there. You'll get a lot of Glock specific folks that might be able to at least give you some advice on dealing with Glock after a situation like this.
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  12. #12
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    If you can find the specs/outside dimensions of the barrel, measure your barrel with a pair of good calibers from the crown all the way down. If you do it right, you will find if there is any bulge, Clean the barrel inside and out, completely, and under a bright light and high power magnifying glass look carefully for what may look like stretch marks, scratches (that could be a crack), etc. If you see ANYTHING that is questionable, time to retire that barrel.

    Your barrel is not the only concern. The heavy recoil may have also damaged the slide from the hard slam backward. I have seen a slide (not a Glock slide) crack from a similar situation. Also, check your internals, look for shaved metal, burrs, or anything that may be slightly bent out of shape.

    Or, you can get a new barrel and save the concern and sweat. There are two things I have learned 1) Never shoot someone else's reload. 2) when shooting my own reloads, if anything doesn't feel right, clear the gun (and clear it again), field strip and check. It only takes a couple of seconds to field strip a Glock, and the the extra time is worth it.
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  13. #13
    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    I can only echo the previous posts. Check your barrel and slide very carefully. As far as inspecting, any good gunsmith should be able to perform the necessary inspections without having to refer the issue to Glock. If you purchased your Glock from a Local Gun Shop, they would be a good place to start for a gunsmith referral.

    I had my first squib load in over 10 years just last week. Fortunately the round did not have enough energy to operate the slide. When the slide failed to cycle, I knew there was a problem. 10 minutes of inspection, dis-assembly, driving the round back out, re-inspection and re-assembly, and I was back on the line.

    Good luck.
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  14. #14
    Distinguished Member Array Rcher's Avatar
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    You sir are a victim of a "squib" load. Some cracks may not be visible to the naked eye. Even a trained eye may not find anything with a microscope. There is a series of tests that need to be performed on that barrel. It needs to be checked with an inside bore micrometer and checked on the outside with a dial caliper or micrometer. Only the manufacturer knows the exact spec's for this. Then I would suggest having the barrel either x-ray'd or magnafluxed. I doubt the gun manufacturer would go through the hassle of these tests unless absolutely necessary, they will most likely want to replace the barrel with one that has been QC'd by their manufacturing process.

    Technically, the only person qualified to guarantee your barrel 100% is a metallurgist. I personally would save the expense and just purchase a new barrel and chalk this one up to experience.
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    Yeah, don't use anyone else's handloads...alot of people think they know what their doing, when they don't have a clue.
    Golden Rule : Never shoot someone else's hand-loads !

    I mentioned to Sig Customer Service when I sent my P220C in that I was shooting hand-loads and
    they reminded me that doing so could void the warranty. So saying that I think most manufacturers
    say the same about reloads.
    To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target.

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