dry firing..newb question..

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    Member Array Yarg28's Avatar
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    dry firing..newb question..

    When I was a kid....long time ago...every gun i ever touched; shotgun, rifle, pistol, whatever, I was always told, never dry fire.
    Now when I'm at shops people are dry firing all the time and I see people discuss dry firing as a training technique.

    I guess designs have changed that much that its no longer a big deal? Is it really ok for me to dry fire my striker fired pistol repeatedly? Or is it a sacrifice people manage to practice?

    I have an M&P and have read comments about the trigger changing/improving with use so i like the idea of dry firing if its ok.

    thanks

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    It's probably bad form to quote oneself, but I'll risk it. Here's something I posted just a few days ago in response to a question about dry-firing a Glack:

    Just a general note or two on dry firing. With the general shift to rebounding firing pin mechanisms, and with improved metallurgy since slightly before WWII, dry-firing centerfire guns is generally no longer a problem. I would avoid dry-firing break-action long guns (especially those that sell for more than a week's pay), but repeating guns of all sorts can safely be dry-fired without fear of hurting the gun. The most common problem with dry firing appears to be broken firing pins, but that situation has been improved with better metallurgy.

    Rimfires are a different story. Unless the gun has been designed for safe dry-firing, it's probably best to err on the side of caution and not dry-fire rimfire guns indiscriminately. I can say without equivocation that every Ruger rimfire made is safe to dry fire, due to foresight in design of both firing pin and chamber. By inspection, if the breech face of the gun has a cutout in line with the firing pin on the bolt, then you can be reasonably certain that dry firing won't hurt it.
    You can dry-fire your M&P safely. If you want to do it thousands upon thousands of times, snap caps might be advisable.
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    Distinguished Member Array phreddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    It's probably bad form to quote oneself, but I'll risk it. Here's something I posted just a few days ago in response to a question about dry-firing a Glack:
    Also, after reading the above post, if you are still concerned, snap caps are an inexpensive extra measure of care.

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    Member Array Yarg28's Avatar
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    The quote helps clarify it a lot.

    Snap caps sound good.

    Thanks guys

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    Distinguished Member Array OhioCatter's Avatar
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    I use snap caps when I practice my dry fire drills.
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    Will it harm your firearm? Probably not, but the possibility exists under repeated dryfiring. One thing for sure, a snapcap definitely won't harm your firearm.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Will it harm your firearm? Probably not, but the possibility exists under repeated dryfiring. One thing for sure, a snapcap definitely won't harm your firearm.
    I concur. Even though many are safe to dry fire on an empty chamber, the engineer in me still knows that the machine was designed to operate with a round in the chamber.
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    Member Array AlDente67's Avatar
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    I have snapcaps for most of my guns, but I never really understood the concept. If I want to practice pulling the weapon, I just don't pull the trigger because I know what would happen with live rounds. Sort of like a 98% test concept, where the extra 2% is a known entity.

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    Always worth a reminder. When you DO dry fire practice. Remove all live ammunition from the area and check and recheck to make certain that your firearm is clear and all magazines are only stoked with Snap Caps.

    Allow yourself some time to make absolutely certain that you are being 100% safe before you begin a practice session.

    And...get in the habit of re-holstering slowly. There is never any real need to do a lightning fast re-holster.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlDente67 View Post
    I have snap caps for most of my guns, but I never really understood the concept. If I want to practice pulling the weapon, I just don't pull the trigger because I know what would happen with live rounds. Sort of like a 98% test concept, where the extra 2% is a known entity.
    Actually if a person is practicing a draw and presentation against a known immediate deadly threat then the shooter should be practicing with an actual trigger pull on the way out to extended.

    Feel free to Fast Forward to about 1:16 to miss the preamble on this Video.

    Yes, I know that it's an extremely basic entry level Vid but, we have a ton of new members that may find it helpful.

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    Senior Member Array 031131's Avatar
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    I would think it would say in the manual if you could or not. I know for two (well I sold one) of my guns it says no dry firing. They happened to be .22 pistols. Perhaps that is true of all .22 pistols. Anyway newer guns will say if you can or not in the manual. Snap caps are safe bets though.

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    Member Array MJClark's Avatar
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    I have been told that the M&P's can be dry fired... but snap caps are never a bad idea. I totally agree with the whole safety thing. Check, recheck, and recheck again.

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    Member Array Yarg28's Avatar
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    thanks for the video!

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    Distinguished Member Array phreddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 031131 View Post
    I would think it would say in the manual if you could or not. I know for two (well I sold one) of my guns it says no dry firing. They happened to be .22 pistols. Perhaps that is true of all .22 pistols. Anyway newer guns will say if you can or not in the manual. Snap caps are safe bets though.
    Rimfire guns are more subject to damage due the the arrangement of the firing pin. If the gun is not manufactured for it, the firing pin can hit the chamber wall if there is no casing in the chamber. Ruger manufactures its rimfires with a notch so that this cannot happen. I do not know about other .22 manufactueres. This is what gasmitty was referring to in his post.

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    After a few decades I have yet to ruin a gun by dry firing it however that is with guns that the manual says are OK to dry fire. I would not worry about it unless the manufacturer says not to dry fire it. Snap caps are OK but really not needed. They end up indented anyway and a spent shell casing would do the same. If you are concerned about safety in using shell casings just paint them. One lesson I learned the hard way about how our minds can sometimes fool us, is to buy a $40 ballistic clipboard on the internet and dry fire into that. That way if somehow (and it does happen to even the professionals) a live round is fired, it will be absorbed by the ballistic clipboard. A bucket of sand works just as well. Before anyone says that our brains are the best safety I will remind them that if they were we would not need traffic laws, enforced seat belt and smoke detector laws, etc.. We are human and we make mistakes. The only difference is when and how many times we have the opportunity to make them. If you rarely drive you will likely have no car negligence's. If you drive a lot you are more like to have the occasional car negligence. :) It is amazing how a small interruption in your thought process can lead to an accident in any activity so always use a back stop when you dry fire. One nationally known instructor tells the story of the hotel near his facility where his students stay refusing to house any more students because of too many TV's shot while dry firing and many of the shooters were the best and brightest from law enforcement agencies around the nation. Stuff happens so just be careful.

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