3-D printed guns; can someone explain to me...

3-D printed guns; can someone explain to me...

This is a discussion on 3-D printed guns; can someone explain to me... within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Can anyone here explain to me, in common terms, exactly what a "3-D printed gun" is. Why is everyone getting so excited about it?...

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    Senior Member Array deafdave3's Avatar
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    3-D printed guns; can someone explain to me...

    Can anyone here explain to me, in common terms, exactly what a "3-D printed gun" is. Why is everyone getting so excited about it?
    A CCW is like a parachute; if you need one, and don't have one, you'll probably never need one again.


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    Look up youtube videos on 3D printing. It's basically a printer that makes actual objects. Or use the fastest, easiest source for answers in the world - Google
    The stupidity of some people NEVER ceases to amaze me.

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    3-D printers are just exactly what it sounds like. They "Print" in 3 dimensions. Some with polymers, some with metal. Basically a powder is sprayed and solidified in a 3 dimensional matrix. I'm not conversant with the exact methods. I assume that heat and or solvents are involved. This gun was produced almost entirely in one of these printers with the exception the firing pin and a chunk of metal to make it "detectable" to meet the ATF requirements of a licensed manufacturer.

    This is a big deal really only to the techno geeks. It has always been legal for an individual to make their own guns(at least as far as the ATF is concerned, consult your local and state laws), this is simply a bit cheaper way of doing it, though that may be arguable right now. I have a feeling that the printer capable of this is extremely expensive as of yet. Though the bench top CNC mills are quite capable of producing a serviceable pistol or rifle except for the rifled barrels.

    I haven't looked into this too deeply yet. Does anyone know if this pistol is rifled? Has it been tested for longevity/durability at all?
    Last edited by luvmy40; May 8th, 2013 at 11:01 PM. Reason: typo
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    they got 10 .380 rounds out of it before the barrel cracked, no rifling that I know of.

    It is printed with a plastic polymer that comes in cassettes it is basically a spool of plastic wire that is fed into a heated chamber (200 degrees or so) and melted and placed based on a cad file. the printers are currently $2300 and up but next month staples will be releasing a $1300 model. The material cassettes are in the $50 range. The printer they used cost them $8000 off of ebay and was a more industrial printer that probably cost $20,000 to begin with. I have had the opportunity to set up one of these printers and watch how they worked.

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    The MSM is making a big deal out of it because it potentially puts untrackable firearms in the hands of individuals with NO background check whatsoever. It's frightening to them that no matter what gun control legislation they attempt to pass, this technology could actually put a firearm in the hands of every person in the world in a few minutes.

    There's also a fear that people will finally have a firearm that cannot be detected by metal detectors. Never mind the fact that they still have to sneak bullets through a detector somehow.
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    So, basically a rigid conduit zipper with a spring steel/finish nail FCG is superior?
    Quote Originally Posted by Lightweb View Post
    they got 10 .380 rounds out of it before the barrel cracked, no rifling that I know of.

    It is printed with a plastic polymer that comes in cassettes it is basically a spool of plastic wire that is fed into a heated chamber (200 degrees or so) and melted and placed based on a cad file. the printers are currently $2300 and up but next month staples will be releasing a $1300 model. The material cassettes are in the $50 range. The printer they used cost them $8000 off of ebay and was a more industrial printer that probably cost $20,000 to begin with. I have had the opportunity to set up one of these printers and watch how they worked.
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    Distinguished Member Array squid86's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by luvmy40 View Post
    3-D printers are just exactly what it sounds like. They "Print" in 3 dimensions. Some with polymers, some with metal. Basically a powder is sprayed and solidified in a 3 dimensional matrix. I'm not conversant with the exact methods. I assume that heat and or solvents are involved. This gun was produced almost entirely in one of these printers with the exception the firing pin and a chunk of metal to make it "detectable" to meet the ATF requirements of a licensed manufacturer.

    This is a big deal really only to the techno geeks. It has always been legal for an individual to make their own guns(at least as far as the ATF is concerned, consult your local and state laws), this is simply a bit cheaper way of doing it, though that may be arguable right now. I have a feeling that the printer capable of this is extremely expensive as of yet. Though the bench top CNC mills are quite capable of producing a serviceable pistol or rifle except for the rifled barrels.

    I haven't looked into this too deeply yet. Does anyone know if this pistol is rifled? Has it been tested for longevity/durability at all?
    This pretty much hits the nail on the head. I really don't see why people are making such a big deal of this. Its always been legal for one to make their own gun...and this is plastic yeah, but the ammo is metal, they have a metal firing pin, and they have a chunk of metal to make it legal too. Just people are scared of what theybdont understand. I personally wouldn't trust an all plastic gun.
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    Quote Originally Posted by squid86 View Post
    I personally wouldn't trust an all plastic gun.
    And I don't think Cody Wilson would either. The point is the implications of what's to come. Take a look at their website, DEFCAD

    Using logic, we can readily assume that it won't be long before the traditional slam fire 12 gauge zip gun becomes a striker 12. Pepperbox revolvers made with pipes will also be very simple to make with a printer and a few very readily available parts.

    No longer will it be necessary to have the know how and expensive tools (beyond the printer) to build a devastating firearm, and no longer is it the case that it's even remotely possible to ban magazines. At any level, gun laws are going to be challenged by this. Even ammo restrictions I am confident will be countered with electronic arc detonation for home brewed black powder. This could have been a good thing, for example, for 11 million holocaust victims in WWII.

    I am not sure if the good outweighs the bad, or the other way around, but either way, things in the gun world are changing, especially on the political side.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michigander View Post
    No longer will it be necessary to have the know how and expensive tools (beyond the printer) to build a devastating firearm, and no longer is it the case that it's even remotely possible to ban magazines. At any level, gun laws are going to be challenged by this.
    - IMO, printing magazines would be be an even bigger challenge to existing laws. While it's easy to buy "high capacity" magazines out of state if you live in a restricted state, all you would need is to have metal springs on hand to create the magazines you would need. I would hope that this fact alone would start to break down restrictive magazine laws.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the outcome of the vote." ~ Benjamin Franklin

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    And even the metal springs in magazines are'nt really necessary. Plastic ones that have been fabricated have worked quite well.
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    While a 3D gun is undetectable with metal detectors the ammunition is detectable.........

    It is something the anti gun folks can use to further their cause........ "OMG a gun that is undetectable.....OMG!!!!!!!!"
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    Well following the lead of an empty gun can still shoot someone by some female senator a while back. And the latest discovery that a pencil is a weapon when pointed at someone and gun noises are made, I tried printing up a Glock with old Hewlet Packard printer. Used that heavy gloss paper too.

    Darn thing dont shoot worth a hoot. Wont put a hole in nothing no matter if I make RPG noises.

    I guess I can give it my grandaughter so she can get a few days off school with it though
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    Quote Originally Posted by tokerblue View Post
    Never mind the fact that they still have to sneak bullets through a detector somehow.
    Ceramics? The functional "printed gun" is a milestone in a new tchnology. Not practicle, but an acheivement none the less. The time will come when most any product currently made by machinists can be duplicated on a "printer", but current technology creates a replica in weak plastics or crumbly metal powders, best suited for casting patterns. That method can be used to make a metal gun parts at home that will work with a little filing. Metals can be smelted in a microwave in small batches.
    Microwave melting of metals
    For those luddites who feel the need to create laws restricting the use of 3D printers, you can still whack someone with a rock a lot easier.
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