Can a semi-auto be immune to limp wristing?

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Thread: Can a semi-auto be immune to limp wristing?

  1. #1
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    Can a semi-auto be immune to limp wristing?

    Can a semi-auto be immune to limp wristing?

    This seems to be one of the top 3 reasons I see handguns malfunction, isn't their a way to get around this issue by design?

    From my experience, these are the top 3 reasons guns jam.

    1) Bad ammo
    2) Mag magazine
    3 Limp Wristing
    Last edited by Jamie Young; November 15th, 2006 at 10:41 AM.

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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    I've got a CZ P-01 that seems immune. I've sent a couple thousand rounds through it, including several hundred purposely limp-wristing it. Across nearly 500 rounds of limping it, there has only been one jam ... and it's not certain the limping along caused it, as it's still relatively new (> 3000 rounds so far).
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    VIP Member Array Redneck Repairs's Avatar
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    I have seen many commander and full sized 1911s that were totaly immune to limp wristing in fact many if not most duty sized pistols are immune to it . Limp wristing comes into play IMHO when you start downsizing a design , or in smaller pistols . It seems to me to be a function of lack of slide mass more than anything .
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    Heavy slide of steel and light recoil spring?

    When a semiauto handgun is fired, the force of the high pressure propellant gas acting against the ammunition casing pushes the slide backwards. The frame of the gun must be held in place fairly firmly, so the slide can move completely back relative to the frame, ejecting the spent casing and loading a new round from the magazine. If the frame is not held firmly, as in "limp wristing", the friction between slide and frame, as well as the compression of the recoil spring, can cause the frame to move backwards along with the slide, so the ejection cycle is not completed and the gun jams.

    Normally the shooter's hand or hands on the frame, with a firm grip, provides the opposing force so the slide can cycle completely. But a heavy frame with plenty of inertia can provide an opposing force as well. Lightweight polymer frames having less inertia are known for their tendency to exacerbate "limp wristing". So a heavy frame made entirely of steel would be the best defense against limp wristing by providing adequate inertia to cycle the gun in spite of a possible weak grip by the shooter.

    I'd say something like a full size steel 1911 with a light recoil spring shooting moderate ammo loads would be the least likely handgun to suffer "limp wristing".

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    RR and Pogo - agree with you.

    From my own experience, large and heavy guns suffer least, like probably not at all. I think I could fire my 226 ST with the lightest of grips and yet due to its intertial mass it will cycle fully.

    The mass is such that the rest of the gun cannot accelerate fast enough as the slide moves to deprive said slide of much resistance, and so it will be probably fully back and recovering forward before the rest has ''woken up''!

    Another way to think of it is re recoil. Heavy guns ''soak up'' recoil - again inertial mass - the event (firing) is over so fast the mass has barely started to accelerate toward the shooter.

    Yep - small semi's are the limp wrist culprits in my book - small KT's, the R9 etc. So little mass in themselves that if the frame is not properly restrained as slide starts travel - then that energy gets dissipated and an incomplete cycle can result.
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    Senior Member Array AirForceShooter's Avatar
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    I have never been a believer in the theory that "limp wristing" causes jams. A properly tuned gun should never jam because of how you hold it.

    Just my .02

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    Distinguished Member Array RSSZ's Avatar
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    Unless with abnormally light return spring,and/or abnormally hot ammo,which would speed up the slide,I feel that I could get ANY pistol to FTF or FTE by limp wristin' it. (This, although the weapon might fall from my hand.)

    From a 1911 point of view I would have to say/speculate that the 3 things(in order) that would stop a 1911 would be..........1. mag used.....2.overall preventive maintance(dirt,lube,springs,etc.)......3.limp wristing/ammo(tie for third)

    The two weapons that I own that I feel are the MOST prone to FTF's and FTE's due to limp wristing are my .44Mag Desert Eagle and my KelTec P-3AT. Interesting pair of weapons on the opposite side of the power curve,huh.

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    Member Array katmandoo122's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AirForceShooter View Post
    I have never been a believer in the theory that "limp wristing" causes jams. A properly tuned gun should never jam because of how you hold it.

    Just my .02

    AFS
    Tuning does not overcome physics. Fact is that if the frame moves in concert with the slide, you may have a ftf. I'm willing to bet (but not spend the time to set it up) that if you took any of your semis and set them up on a rig that, when fired, allowed the firearm to move freely backward upon firing, you would have FTFs.

    However, in reality, it should be rare.

    In my experience, Glocks have the most FTFs due to limping them. Not sure why though.

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    My 5" 1911 seems immune, as well as my PPK, P2000sk and G26. My full size P99 will malf if I severely limpwrist.
    I haven't tried with others...

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    I'd say something like a full size steel 1911 with a light recoil spring shooting moderate ammo loads would be the least likely handgun to suffer "limp wristing".

    Well, I heard the exact opposite from a 1911 gunsmith. He said the heavier recoil springs slow down the slide return and make a 1911 more susceptable to limp wristing.

    I believe it was 1911Tuner from THR that told me this.

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    Never had a problem with limp wristing any semi. I think I is either uncommon , or maybe just a beginners affliction.
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    Learn to shoot without a limp wrist is the best idea.

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    Senior Member Array razorblade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocky View Post
    maybe just a beginners affliction.
    Beginner's affliction. Not being familiar with the recoil. Eventually you outgrow it, I think. Either that, or you get really good at Tap, Rack, Bang.

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    Member Array katmandoo122's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocky View Post
    Never had a problem with limp wristing any semi. I think I is either uncommon , or maybe just a beginners affliction.
    I'd say it is largely a beginner's affiliction and I would also say that women TEND to have it happen more

    Also, as I stated earlier, I've seen it happen a number of times with Glocks, but again I am not sure why.

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