Glock's Grip Angle

Glock's Grip Angle

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Thread: Glock's Grip Angle

  1. #1
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Glock's Grip Angle



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    Only one opinion but after watching the clip it would seem that, instead of illustrating a natural grasp of the Glock, the finger appears to be artificially adjusting itself in order to promote the angle that shows the Glock to best advantage. The last time the three pistols were grasped in profile to the camera (beginning at 1:52), it was apparent that the Glock also pointed just as low as the other two did until the grasp/finger adjustment was made.

    I'm known to be thick-headed but don't understand the positive advantages of "breaking the wrist" as an aid to pointing the handgun as is suggested in the clip.

    I'm not at all a fan of Glock handguns however it has nothing to do with the gun's point-ability. A handgun's point-ability is subjective and while point-ability is a desirable feature it isn't nearly as crucial as it's made out to be. One can easily master a handgun having perhaps less "point-ability" but being balanced by other desirable features. A whole lot of the "pistol switcheroo" we sometimes see in Forum thread discussion is the result of uninitiated folks making a gun shop selection based on the fact that "it felt good" when handled over the counter of the pistol case but didn't work out so well once they lived with the gun and became more familiar with shooting it and with shooting in general.

    Humans are adaptable and can easily learn to accommodate handgun handling differences with a familiarity bred through practice.

    To me the Glock points a bit high to suit my own tastes. The Glock points much like a Luger which has much the same grip angle and I could happily live with that characteristic.
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  3. #3
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Thank you for your comment!!!

    Glocks point high if you do not grip them as you would properly point with your index finger. To properly point a Glock, one has to "break" ones wrist, exactly as one would point. For ME, it is the perfect grip because of its angle and similarity to something I have done all my life...which is pointing. If I "break" my wrist all the way, my Glock 17 does take a very minimal nose dive but nothing like a 1911, Sig or Beretta. HOWEVER, one does not break ones wrist ALL THE WAY when pointing.

    Also, one can not discount the lock-up one gets from breaking ones wrist as it creates a more stable and strong platform.

    This video is not intended to bash any other handgun and is a very subjective account. It also takes into account how one points in conjunction with Glock's grip angle.

    Again, as I mention in the video, this is what I think and a feature that works for me.

    BTW, I am a HUGE fan of 1911s.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Only one opinion but after watching the clip it would seem that, instead of illustrating a natural grasp of the Glock, the finger appears to be artificially adjusting itself in order to promote the angle that shows the Glock to best advantage. The last time the three pistols were grasped in profile to the camera (beginning at 1:52), it was apparent that the Glock also pointed just as low as the other two did until the grasp/finger adjustment was made.

    I'm known to be thick-headed but don't understand the positive advantages of "breaking the wrist" as an aid to pointing the handgun as is suggested in the clip.

    I'm not at all a fan of Glock handguns however it has nothing to do with the gun's point-ability. A handgun's point-ability is subjective and while point-ability is a desirable feature it isn't nearly as crucial as it's made out to be. One can easily master a handgun having perhaps less "point-ability" but being balanced by other desirable features. A whole lot of the "pistol switcheroo" we sometimes see in Forum thread discussion is the result of uninitiated folks making a gun shop selection based on the fact that "it felt good" when handled over the counter of the pistol case but didn't work out so well once they lived with the gun and became more familiar with shooting it and with shooting in general.

    Humans are adaptable and can easily learn to accommodate handgun handling differences with a familiarity bred through practice.

    To me the Glock points a bit high to suit my own tastes. The Glock points much like a Luger which has much the same grip angle and I could happily live with that characteristic.
    Last edited by PhoenixTS; May 29th, 2013 at 11:12 PM.
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    At least you made a video. I'm way too self-conscious to be eloquent enough to state my case, all while illustrating it in front of a camera.

    It's funny about this subjective "point-ibility" thing. The two guns which seem to possess that trait in largest measure for me are the full-sized 1911 guns with short triggers/arched mainspring housings and ... wait for it... the Colt Single Action Army.

    Having said that, I've spent far more time behind 1911s with flat mainspring housings and long triggers so they feel comfortingly familiar. Not sure my old Smith & Wesson Model 10 really possesses any special pointing characteristics for me but the familiarity bred of long usage makes it surest "pointer" of them all in my hands.

    Apparently I don't break my wrist when pointing. I've been sitting here talking to a relative on the phone while pointing at objects in the room. Maybe I just don't know what constitutes breaking one's wrist when pointing a finger or a handgun.
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    Pretend you see something and with conviction say "I want that one" while you point at it! I can't do it without having my forearm in line with my index finger.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    At least you made a video. I'm way too self-conscious to be eloquent enough to state my case, all while illustrating it in front of a camera.

    It's funny about this subjective "point-ibility" thing. The two guns which seem to possess that trait in largest measure for me are the full-sized 1911 guns with short triggers/arched mainspring housings and ... wait for it... the Colt Single Action Army.

    Having said that, I've spent far more time behind 1911s with flat mainspring housings and long triggers so they feel comfortingly familiar. Not sure my old Smith & Wesson Model 10 really possesses any special pointing characteristics for me but the familiarity bred of long usage makes it surest "pointer" of them all in my hands.

    Apparently I don't break my wrist when pointing. I've been sitting here talking to a relative on the phone while pointing at objects in the room. Maybe I just don't know what constitutes breaking one's wrist when pointing a finger or a handgun.

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    Interesting comparison, and I'm one that truly appreciates the engineering that went into the Glock grip angle.
    Gaston did not make the Glock grip angle that way by accident. By "breaking your wrist" slightly, it forces the shooter to lean into the gun a bit, and aids in recoil management and faster follow up shots. Non-Glock owners complain that the Glock grip angle sucks and doesn't fit them. Too bad they don't "get it".

    A Glock in rapid fire is a thing of beauty.....with a lot of that owed to the grip angle.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    To me the Glock points a bit high to suit my own tastes.
    Similar to my experience with them. But when I "lean into it" ('athletic' stance), it's just about right. Without that, just lobbing off a couple rounds toward the target, I'm generally high and left (lefty, here); but, "leaning into it," everything's spot-on. In a very real sense, I find its angle and pointability promoting a better stance, better form, resulting in overall better POI and follow-up consistency. Funny how Gaston saw all of this, during the design phase. Kudos.
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    Distinguished Member Array Exacto's Avatar
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    I have heard this about Glocks and I gotta tell ya, I don't get it. I have owned 1911s, Rugers ,S&W M&Ps ,Glocks ,to mention a few ,and I have never had any problem switching from any other gun to a Glock and ever noticed this grip angle thing, and never had any problem shooting any of them. I think you have to be looking for a reason not to like a Glock to make this argument. They all have sights on them and if you get a good sight picture with any of them, and a good target picture with any of them, your likely to hit what your aiming at. Maybe a Glock doesn't fit everyone's hand, or doesn't "feel good" in everyone's hand, but you could say that about any gun. I think some of this stuff can be over analyzed. Grip angle?, really.
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    I agree. There are MANY who for whatever reason hate Glocks, especially the "grip angle". I happen to think it's the most natural grip...for ME. Ultimately you are correct, if you can shoot, you should be able to shoot any handgun.

    Thanks for your comment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Exacto View Post
    I have heard this about Glocks and I gotta tell ya, I don't get it. I have owned 1911s, Rugers ,S&W M&Ps ,Glocks ,to mention a few ,and I have never had any problem switching from any other gun to a Glock and ever noticed this grip angle thing, and never had any problem shooting any of them. I think you have to be looking for a reason not to like a Glock to make this argument. They all have sights on them and if you get a good sight picture with any of them, and a good target picture with any of them, your likely to hit what your aiming at. Maybe a Glock doesn't fit everyone's hand, or doesn't "feel good" in everyone's hand, but you could say that about any gun. I think some of this stuff can be over analyzed. Grip angle?, really.

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    Senior Member Array Jemsaal's Avatar
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    What I don't get is all the arguing about this stuff. It seems completely subjective. The way I grip a handgun is different than how anyone else grips it, even if we are using the exact same hand placement, because no two people have the exact same hands. So, isn't the proper answer, "the best handgun is the one that fits best in your hand and you can shoot the best?"
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    I love the angle of the Glock grip. It feels more natural to me.

    Now, if I could only get a Glock with the same Glock grip angle, but the shape of an XDm grip.... That would be my perfect pistol. Love the feel of the XDm grip.

    By the way, I like your videos.

  12. #12
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Thank you for your comment!

    The reason I posted this is that many complain about the Glock grip angle specifically. You are correct, it is important for a handgun to fit the shooter's hand. If you can shoot, you should be able to shoot any handgun...of course so long as it properly fits your hand (some have very small or very large hands). I was just trying to show that the Glock, in fact, has one of the most natural grip angles out there.

    Now if they'd go back to the Gen 2 finger grooveless front strap.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jemsaal View Post
    What I don't get is all the arguing about this stuff. It seems completely subjective. The way I grip a handgun is different than how anyone else grips it, even if we are using the exact same hand placement, because no two people have the exact same hands. So, isn't the proper answer, "the best handgun is the one that fits best in your hand and you can shoot the best?"
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  13. #13
    Member Array PhoenixTS's Avatar
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    Thank you for your comment!

    XDs are great handguns. Is it the Glock finger grooves that you dislike?

    I appreciate your kind words...thanks again.

    Quote Originally Posted by blake716 View Post
    I love the angle of the Glock grip. It feels more natural to me.

    Now, if I could only get a Glock with the same Glock grip angle, but the shape of an XDm grip.... That would be my perfect pistol. Love the feel of the XDm grip.

    By the way, I like your videos.

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    Ex Member Array DetChris's Avatar
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    I'm fairly new to Glocks myself but I love them. I did notice during my range sessions that I did a lot better when I leaned forward and rested more weight on my left leg (I shoot from a modified weaver stance - strong side arm locked at the elbow, support elbow and support knee bent) effectively shifting my weight forward. The grip actually forces me into that position and I feel a lot more stable and ready for the next shot compared to when I used to shoot XD's. Very interesting. This may make training time with Glocks a whole different deal than when I train with my other guns.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhoenixTS View Post
    Pretend you see something and with conviction say "I want that one" while you point at it! I can't do it without having my forearm in line with my index finger.
    I did exactly that, and wouldn't you know it, I was pointing at another 1911!
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