Outstanding article (LINK) on proper pistol grip MUST HAVE

This is a discussion on Outstanding article (LINK) on proper pistol grip MUST HAVE within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I am simply passing on an article written by one of the best shooters I've seen around our area and a master firearms instructor. The ...

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Thread: Outstanding article (LINK) on proper pistol grip MUST HAVE

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    Member Array GeorgiaShooter's Avatar
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    Outstanding article (LINK) on proper pistol grip MUST HAVE

    I am simply passing on an article written by one of the best shooters I've seen around our area and a master firearms instructor. The way he outlines his ideas with clear steps and crystal clear photos makes this process of learning the proper grip much easier than even watching a video. I can say from my own experience this vastly improves your speed, accuracy and how the gun presents perfectly on target even before full arm extension. And your recoil management graduates to a whole other level. Here is the information he posted on the georgiapacking.org site and forum. He has other videos and articles on the web under Claude Werner. I highly recommend. He is also a master shooter in several divisions of IDPA and a long list of credentials and accolades. He has an almost cyborg perfection to his draw stroke and shooting abilities for self defense. ENJOY the pass along. You have also seen Claude on NRA, Personal Defense Network and other publications and I believe he participates in the shot show every year in some manner. I follow his youtube channel and other activities from a learning standpoint.


    Quote Originally Posted by HeadHunter
    I finally put my thoughts about gripping the pistol into an article.

    The proper grip for any handgun should accomplish several objectives:

    1. Maximize our hand friction on the handgun. The way we prevent the handgun from moving around in our hand(s) is simply via friction. Therefore, the more hand surface we have in contact with the gun, the more friction we can achieve.
    2. Minimize the gun’s motion during recoil by stabilizing the supporting joints, principally the wrists, when the gun fires.
    3. Reduce the distance between the line of the handgun’s bore and our hands to the smallest amount possible. This diminishes the rotational torque generated by the handgun upon firing.


    After establishing the appropriate grip, a series of index points can be used to feel when the grip has been properly achieved. Especially in defensive encounters, there is no time for visually checking whether the proper grip is in place. Having a set of index points allows a shooter to establish a proper firing grip in the holster and during the drawstroke, knowing by feel that the grip is as it should be.
    Link to full article.

    BadgerJ and Hobo_Hunter like this.

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    Senior Member Array NH_Esau's Avatar
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    Great article - really interesting would be an article about the evolution of the firing grips.

    I'm not old enough to have been taught 1-hand as a primary combat (not target) grip. But for combat shooting, I started being taught isoscelese thumb over thumb stance (revolver), then they said to go to a Weaver stance (still thumb-over-thumb for revolvers, not so for pistols... and my left thumb has scars to prove it) to blade your profile and make it more rifle-like. I still remember the first time I was taught that. Guy said "start in the interview stance, then point at the target with your finger. Freeze. That's your strong hand position."

    Then we got instructors arguing over Weaver vs. Chapman (BTW, since I wasn't following shooting competitions, I honestly had no idea who these guys were, or that this argument had been going along for about a decade) and I started shooting a bastardized version between the two that seemed to work. Then, Weaver was bad because it exposed your body armor holes and restricted your support-side turret movement, so back to isoscelese it was. Then it was "sort of isoscelese" - keep square to the target, but less rigid on where the feet go.

    Then a few years back, the instructors started telling me to point with my thumbs with my support hand in front of the guard and my wrist locked out. That one really worked for me... in fact I was pretty amazed at how much better I shot from both stationary and on the move.

    And now, they're telling me to keep pointing with my thumbs, but as above. It works fine for me, and I think I'm seeing a small improvement on rapid strings, so I'm trying to make that grip natural. But during draw drills my hand still tends to go to the front of the trigger guard. Older dogs are harder to teach new tricks.

    I still know a lot of guys greyer than me who continue to put me to shame using some pretty "outdated" stances and grips.

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    Senior Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    I like point circled 4, stabilizing the wrist. Great OP!

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    Member Array GeorgiaShooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NH_Esau View Post
    Great article - really interesting would be an article about the evolution of the firing grips.
    .
    Have you ever seen this video on the evolution of the grip from the 70/80s?

    Evolution of Combat Pistol Technique by D.R. Middlebrooks - YouTube

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    Distinguished Member Array Exacto's Avatar
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    That support hand thumb IMHO, is too high up on the slide. Under stress you react differently that when shooting paper, and if you interfere with the slide just a little ,by applying too much pressure, you may keep it from going into battery for that second shot. I have seen this happen in IDPA competition when the shooters are stressed.
    Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunder bolt...... Sun Tzu.

    The supreme art of war is to defeat the enemy without fighting........ Sun Tzu.

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    Member Array dwyermw's Avatar
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    Superb! TY for posting!

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    Member Array GeorgiaShooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exacto View Post
    That support hand thumb IMHO, is too high up on the slide. Under stress you react differently that when shooting paper, and if you interfere with the slide just a little ,by applying too much pressure, you may keep it from going into battery for that second shot. I have seen this happen in IDPA competition when the shooters are stressed.

    I think his grip is fine but has a longer thumb that's shaped like that. I think if his photo had been viewing downward we'd see how the thumb clears the slide a lot but I hear you. If you can get the thumb to point forward exactly like a finger and down the frame you're a little more failure proof. The key, as he says, I believe is learning the FEEL of those contact points. Just so happens this guy writing the article has one of the best grips and draws I've ever seen but I totally understand the valid point you make. I see a lot of odd hand and thumb sizes and shapes out there.

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