Pix of Rhino Arms Double V 5.56

This is a discussion on Pix of Rhino Arms Double V 5.56 within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I gave the impression that I wasn't an AR/M4 o'phile on some other threads, but that isn't the case. To me they are the most ...

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Thread: Pix of Rhino Arms Double V 5.56

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    Distinguished Member Array Jaeger's Avatar
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    Pix of Rhino Arms Double V 5.56

    I gave the impression that I wasn't an AR/M4 o'phile on some other threads, but that isn't the case. To me they are the most versatile firearms that exist.

    I prefer heavy AR uppers just because I like shooting long range as a hobby. They are certainly not as perfect for CQB as shorter and lighter carbine barrels, but it's a compromise I'm willing live with to have the option of engaging accurately at extreme ranges, and to make it more useful to me. I can always swap and make it into an M4.

    The following are pix of my Double V 5.56 new out of the box. Like all precision rifles it requires a bit of breaking in expanding the thermal envelope of the barrel very slowly. I'm actually not to the point where I want to rip off 30rnd mags with it yet, but in a couple of more trips to the range I'll be there.

    If you are into precision ARs this is a production 1/2 MOA rifle that probably exceeds most hand made ARs. The CNC machines that create these are just smaller versions of the ones making missile parts and F-35 control surfaces, and they machine to finer/higher tolerances than anything else out there of which I'm aware. The factory triggers squeeze like glass, and I doubt I'll have anything done to it. I also think the Magpul stock that comes on it is perfect and won't change it either. They mill their own rails, and aftermarket rails won't fit, so you have to buy them from Rhino, which is a drawback. If you want two or four you're paying them again. The muzzle break makes this louder than a normal AR, and without hearing protection it wouldn't be as pleasant.

    In any event I'm extremely happy with it, and it is certainly the best shooting AR I have by a pretty wide margin, and I have a few. If this is your thing, and you don't mind a semi-auto, I would consider investing. They haven't been around very long and are extremely back ordered. People who ordered them at last years Shot Show got them in about 8 months. It's down to three or four now, and they're making them night and day. I would expect by the Fall they'll start showing up in your higher end stores. There have been no less than three price bumps since they started production, but I would bet they'll come down when they catch up.

    photo.JPGimage.jpegimage (4).jpgimage (3).jpgimage (2).jpgimage (1).jpg

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    Array buckeye .45's Avatar
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    Looks like quite the nice shooter.

    What's the barrel twist rate? What ammo do you run in it? Optics or irons?

    I actually have grown quite fond of mock dissipator ARs, which most nobody seems to really appreciate the versatility of. Carbine length and weight, mid length gas system, and a full rifle length sight radius. They generally aren't precision rifles, but most will shoot them better than a M-4gery.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

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    Distinguished Member Array Jaeger's Avatar
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    16" barrel with a 1:9. The barrel is HEAVY. It would be a problem for the guys who prefer M4 for home defense, but its rock solid way beyond typical 5.56 ranges for me. My only problem is seeing the targets beyond 300yds. I should quit spending money on this stuff and invest in a pair of glasses!

    I've got a Trijicon ACOG, the fiber one in x4, two sets of Magpul fixed, and a set of Troy fixed. I think I like the Troy better for fixed, but only because there's a wide and a narrow aperture you can just flip to change. They're not spring loaded like the Magpuls which make you look kewl, but that's a very small minus. The ACOG is probably a little too powerful for close defensive use, and a simple reflex would probably be better, but I don't use it for that. I jump the sights across several ARs, which is one of the benefits of such a versatile platform.

    I'm looking at a .300 Blackout upper for it, but I know very little about it. I've heard some people say it has superiority over all M4s. If anyone has a 30 cal M4 post up about it, because I'm intrigued. I doubt it would be this year though, because I wouldn't invest unless I had everything to support its feeding habits, and that makes it considerably more expensive than just the upper.

    I've never been intrigued by the AR10s. I have a couple of .308s, and I don't need one with a 30 rnd. magazine. 5.65 has gotten expensive enough to shoot. I got a brass catcher, and I've started reloading them. Didn't see that comming! I've also never had 9mm dies, but I'm thinking about getting a set of them too!

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    That 1/9 twist wouldn't be ideal for the heavier primo match grade and defensive stuff, I am kind of surprised they would use that twist in a rifle like that.

    The ACOG is usable at "inside the house" distances. They are standard issue for Marine infantry (or were in 2011 which is the latest I can guarantee they were). Just use it with both eyes open. Its maybe a fraction slower than a no magnification optic, but the 4x makes it much more versatile over a wide range of applications.

    Shotguns is probably the .300 blackout expert round here, but I have been researching to build one. Basically the round is made from .223 cases, which means the only thing different on the rifle is the barrel. The same mags can be loaded to the same capacity (unlike with the 6.8s), and the same bolt is used.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

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    That 1/9 twist wouldn't be ideal for the heavier primo match grade and defensive stuff, I am kind of surprised they would use that twist in a rifle like that.
    I was puzzled too. I would think they would want them down at 1/7. I agree with the match grade, but why would you want or need a faster twist for defensive (which to me means close range)? I think the heavy barrel would be the main drawback rather than the standard twist.
    However, I can attest that from the bench it's preforming as advertised. I'm going out tomorrow, and will post some pix of targets at 100 to show you the groupings I'm getting (I'd show 'em further, but the state park range where I'm going is a shorty). All the ammo will be reloads (Hornady bullets I think), but I'll stick the specs up.

    The ACOG is usable at "inside the house" distances. They are standard issue for Marine infantry (or were in 2011 which is the latest I can guarantee they were). Just use it with both eyes open. Its maybe a fraction slower than a no magnification optic, but the 4x makes it much more versatile over a wide range of applications.
    I agree completely. I can use it fine, just sayin' I think there are probably better options, and guys who rig them specifically for this use probably wouldn't like a 4X. I think more than a fraction slower for me. My focus hardly comes back to the scope eye (except for seeing the aim-point) when moving and firing close. I don't really think about it, I just do it. I see what's in front of me, and see the horseshoe on the target. The rounds hit where I'm aiming, which is all that matters in the end. It's been a long time since I've done it with live rounds, but I'm pretty sure I could give a passable impression.

    Shotguns is probably the .300 blackout expert round here, but I have been researching to build one. Basically the round is made from .223 cases, which means the only thing different on the rifle is the barrel. The same mags can be loaded to the same capacity (unlike with the 6.8s), and the same bolt is used.
    Wow. That's fantastic. What's to build? What about the cost and availability of the rounds? How do they match up with a 5.65?

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    New Member Array Cheddar's Avatar
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    EJ is that you? I just got the Rhino 5.56 as well. Have not received my scope yet (Leupold AR W/firedot). This thing is sweet! Can't wait.

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