G36 slide coating

G36 slide coating

This is a discussion on G36 slide coating within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Been wanting to get it polish/coated, but I can figure out what I actually want to do with it. This is my daily carry so ...

Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: G36 slide coating

  1. #1
    Member Array Newman5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    62

    G36 slide coating

    Been wanting to get it polish/coated, but I can figure out what I actually want to do with it. This is my daily carry so I want something durable, but still looks great.

    Just seeing if anyone has some suggestion on which route to go.


  2. #2
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Hiding inside a bottle of Jim Beam Black.
    Posts
    17,672
    My understand is the Tennifer treatment is in the metal, not the coating on the surface, so it should remain durable. Beyond that, Ceracoat is supposed to be pretty good.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

  3. #3
    Member Array ConcealedinPA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    265
    +1 on the Cerakote. I've been investigating that process for my G20 and as soon as I decide on a color that's the route I'm taking.
    S&W M&P 9c
    S&W 1911
    Glock 20
    Kel-Tec P-11
    Stag Arms 2T
    Benelli m2

    "Your freedom to be you includes my freedom to be free from you"
    "CAPITALISM IS BOSS"  Andrew Wilkow

  4. #4
    Member Array Newman5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    62
    So I should rule out polishing or playing ?

  5. #5
    Distinguished Member Array 5lima30ret's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Mountains of Western North Carolina
    Posts
    1,411
    The Tennifer finish is VERY durable. When I attended the Glock Armorers class the instructors rubbed the finish of a Glock with a penny which initially looked liked scratches. He then buffed off the marks with steel wool. I worked and carried Glocks in humid coastal FL prior to my retirement. They never rusted or pitted. I would save your $$$ and put it towards ammo to feed your Glock!
    Retired Police Lieutenant, Retired USAF Reserve, Glock Armorer, NC CWP, HR-218 Qualified
    Second generation American, Third generation Legionnaire
    "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me" Phil 4:13

  6. #6
    Ex Member Array DetChris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2,625
    Stick with the Tennifer.

  7. #7
    Member Array Newman5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    62
    Actually looking at the KG Gunkote in brushed stainless . Any ideas on that stuff ?

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array zonker1986's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    3,833
    If I were going to re-finish any Glock, it would be with the Nickel Boron that these guys do. I've seen a few Glocks with Nickel Boron Slides and barrels, and they are well done. Nickel boron is a very, very durable process. I'm done with anythng Duracoated or Ceracoated.....they all eventually chip and look like crap.

    WMD Guns: Gun Coating and Firearm Coating
    Kimbers are the guns you show your friends....Glocks are the ones you show your enemies.

  9. #9
    Member Array Newman5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    62
    This looks pretty good too , and a decent price.

    http://www.ccrrefinishing.com/information.html

  10. #10
    Distinguished Member Array technomonster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Dayton Ohio
    Posts
    1,369
    Quote Originally Posted by Newman5 View Post
    Actually looking at the KG Gunkote in brushed stainless . Any ideas on that stuff ?
    a shiny slide could produce glare between the sights, a fighting gun is better off left in black IMO.

    like a few members have already pointed out the factory finish is not a coating but rather a treatment that goes a few microns deep into the metal and is very durable, perhaps more so then any coating. while it may get some scratches and holster wear around the edges it will not chip like the coatings do.

    Ferritic nitrocarburizing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    if it ain`t broke, don't fix it. unless the factory finish is already beat to hell i would leave it alone and spend the money on ammo and training, or a nice holster.
    “Show me a young Conservative and I'll show you someone with no heart. Show me an old Liberal and I'll show you someone with no brains.” Winston Churchill

  11. #11
    Moderator
    Array Rock and Glock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Colorado at 11,650'
    Posts
    13,153
    The Tenifer is an excellent, durable finish:

    To understand this method, we must first understand a few basic properties of iron and steel. Some materials, such as iron and steel, can exist with different crystalline structures. These different crystalline structures cause the same material to have different physical properties (e.g. different hardness, elasticity etc.). These different crystal structures are called "phases". Examples of such phases are: ferritic phase, austenitic phase, martensitic phase, ledeburite phase, pearlite phase etc. Both iron and steel can be switched from one phase to another by heating to different temperatures and adding other elements and cooling at different rates to change the crystalline structure of the product.

    The basic concept behind the Ferritic Nitrocarburizing method is to introduce nitrogen and carbon to the steel when its crystal structure is still in the Ferritic phase. The temperature when this is done ranges from between 525-650 degrees centigrade. The first Ferritic Nitrocarburizing treatment process was invented by UK chemical giant, Imperial Chemical Laboratories (ICL), who came up with a process of dropping the workpiece in a sulfur salt bath at 550 degrees centigrade. This process was called Sulfinuz treatment because of the sulfur salt content. It was mainly used for cutting tools and high speed spindle parts, but it had problems with cleaning the solution off.
    TENIFER (Trademark): Unique GLOCK hi-tech surface refinement for barrel and slide. Apart from optimum corrosion protection and anti-reflective finish, a degree of hardness of 64 HRC - close to that of a diamond - is achieved.
    Why would you do that?

    Save your money?
    Last edited by Rock and Glock; July 3rd, 2013 at 11:36 AM.


    The tyrant dies and his rule is over, the martyr dies and his rule begins. ― The Journals of Kierkegaard

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

g36 slide
,

high tech coating for handgun slide

,
slid coating
,
sulfinuz
,

sulfinuz coating

Click on a term to search for related topics.