10/22 Takedown vs regular 10/22

This is a discussion on 10/22 Takedown vs regular 10/22 within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; What are your thoughts in the 10/22 Takedown model vs the regular 10/22 models? What would you choose and why?...

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Thread: 10/22 Takedown vs regular 10/22

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    10/22 Takedown vs regular 10/22

    What are your thoughts in the 10/22 Takedown model vs the regular 10/22 models? What would you choose and why?

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    VIP Member Array tdave's Avatar
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    I've had my regular 10/22 for 30 years now give or take purchased it used. haven't had any problems with it. Getting a take down yes it would be fun but not a need.

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    I'm probably the wrong guy to answer this, as there are five 10/22s on hand here... but if I was buying one today, I would lean heavily toward the takedown model. It simply offers more flexibility for transport and storage. From the reviews I've read and the performance I've seen (enticed a friend to shoot Tac .22 matches, and he got a takedown 10/22), there's no downside beyond the initial higher price.
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    I would like the new take down with a thread barrel . I had a 10/22 but it was just not my thing right now . But having messed with the 10/22 take down it is great gun easy to take apart and get into action .

    Honestly if you just want somthing to plink with / teach someone to shoot etc just get the normal old wooden 10/22 it will serve you fine . But if you think you have a need to have something to throw in a car etc for a hiking/surival or easier to transport piece there you go. Also less stocks may fit the takedown as well . I have seen so much add on for the normal one I cant not even count

    Takedown or Regular 10/22 - Ruger Forum

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    I suppose if I did a lot of hiking and camping it would be ideal when I'm trekking about. Alternatively, if one believes that a cleaning brush muzzle first is sacrilege and will get a good Roman Catholic 10 years in purgatory for every stroke, then yeah, a takedown is the way to go. However, absent these scenario, I don't see much benefit in the utility of the takedown function.

    I'd stick with the two 10/22's I already have.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    I'm probably the wrong guy to answer this, as there are five 10/22s on hand here... but if I was buying one today, I would lean heavily toward the takedown model. It simply offers more flexibility for transport and storage. From the reviews I've read and the performance I've seen (enticed a friend to shoot Tac .22 matches, and he got a takedown 10/22), there's no downside beyond the initial higher price.
    I've owned a lot of 10/22's over the years. When the takedown with the threaded barrel became available, I scooped one up from one of our suppliers as I have a 22 can. I will keep the takedown over the other 10/22's all day long. The convenience of takedown and transport along with the threaded barrel make this one nice set up. I've got a dedicated bdc 22 rifle scope for it, that's calibrated to 150 yrds that's spot on once dialed in at 25 yrds. Perfect and quiet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PEF View Post
    I suppose if I did a lot of hiking and camping it would be ideal when I'm trekking about. Alternatively, if one believes that a cleaning brush muzzle first is sacrilege and will get a good Roman Catholic 10 years in purgatory for every stroke, then yeah, a takedown is the way to go. However, absent these scenario, I don't see much benefit in the utility of the takedown function.

    I'd stick with the two 10/22's I already have.

    Me personal I like the AR-7 as a back bush gun and someting like a sig 522 for 22 plinking as I like swiss guns . But everyone should own at least one 10/22

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    Easier to properly clean the barrel with the Takedown.

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    Thanks for the insights, keep them coming.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NickBurkhardt View Post
    Easier to properly clean the barrel with the Takedown.
    Well, rimfire barrels don't really need a lot of cleaning beyond what a bore snake will cover, but the takedown model will make that occasional event easier, for sure.
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    The 10/22 regular has a ton of aftermarket accessories and stocks. Not so much with the takedown.

    But the takedown is an awesome backpack gun.


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    I've done some pretty extensive testing with the take down model and I've built several custom guns using that platform.

    I never have been a real fan of takedown guns for one reason. Accuracy. They all start out accurate, but as parts wear they give up what makes them accurate. I've seen some old takedown .22 that were so wore out you couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with them.

    So, when the Ruger take down came out, I had several requests for custom builds. I got one and tested it by taking it apart and putting it back together, sometimes 40-50 times at a session. I even put quick detachable scope mounts on them and tested them.
    We put the scope on it, zeroed it it, shot it for groups out to 100 yards, took it off, put it back on and repeated the process dozens of times, too many to count.

    With that being said, I am impressed. Ruger got this one right. There is a knurled nut on the rifle that can be used for "take up" when parts start to wear due to metal rubbing on metal. A small turn of that nut tightens things right back up to where they need to be. As a result of that, the gun stays accurate.

    They are an excellent platform for either a backpacking gun or a "bug out" gun, something that you can stick underneath your truck seat and not have to worry about. You can strap the pack to a 4 wheeler, a horse, or throw it over your shoulder.

    I have SBR'ed some of them, cutting the barrel to where the forearm goes to put a suppressor on and those short barrels display some excellent accuracy even with a suppressor on them.

    They can be put together or taken apart in 15 seconds, using Leupold QD rings on a pictatinny rail holds a repeatable zero, they can take the 30 round magazines and they are light enough to carry all day. What's not to like?

    Here is a pic of one of my demo models. Pictatinny rail, Leupold QD mounts, Nikon Scope, Axiom Folding stock. Ruger B25 magazine. Huntertown Arms Guardian .22 can.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HotGuns View Post
    I've done some pretty extensive testing with the take down model and I've built several custom guns using that platform.

    I never have been a real fan of takedown guns for one reason. Accuracy. They all start out accurate, but as parts wear they give up what makes them accurate. I've seen some old takedown .22 that were so wore out you couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with them.

    So, when the Ruger take down came out, I had several requests for custom builds. I got one and tested it by taking it apart and putting it back together, sometimes 40-50 times at a session. I even put quick detachable scope mounts on them and tested them.
    We put the scope on it, zeroed it it, shot it for groups out to 100 yards, took it off, put it back on and repeated the process dozens of times, too many to count.

    With that being said, I am impressed. Ruger got this one right. There is a knurled nut on the rifle that can be used for "take up" when parts start to wear due to metal rubbing on metal. A small turn of that nut tightens things right back up to where they need to be. As a result of that, the gun stays accurate.

    They are an excellent platform for either a backpacking gun or a "bug out" gun, something that you can stick underneath your truck seat and not have to worry about. You can strap the back to a 4 wheeler, a horse, or throw it over your shoulder.

    I have SBR'ed some of them, cutting the barrel to where the forearm goes to put a suppressor on and those short barrels display some excellent accuracy even with a suppressor on them.

    They can be put together or taken apart in 15 seconds, using Leupold QD rings on a pictatinny rail holds a repeatable zero, they can take the 30 round magazines and they are light enough to carry all day. What's not to like?

    Here is a pic of one of my demo models. Pictatinny rail, Leupold QD mounts, Nikon Scope, Axiom Folding stock. Ruger B25 magazine. Huntertown Arms Guardian .22 can.

    Okay, I changed my mind. I want one. THAT ONE.
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    2. Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
    3. Keep your finger off the trigger until your sights are on the target.
    4. Be sure of your target and what is beyond it.

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    Does the takedown model reliably return to zero after being reassembled?

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