Calling All Cowboys

This is a discussion on Calling All Cowboys within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; A while back my grandfather handed down to me an Ithaca model 72 (.22lr lever-action) and I have really enjoyed it. I have decided it's ...

Results 1 to 13 of 13
Like Tree3Likes
  • 3 Post By bmcgilvray

Thread: Calling All Cowboys

  1. #1
    Member Array woodrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    90

    Calling All Cowboys

    A while back my grandfather handed down to me an Ithaca model 72 (.22lr lever-action) and I have really enjoyed it. I have decided it's time to purchase another lever-action, this time being a larger caliber and I am seeking opinions and input.

    First off, this gun will almost be exclusively for fun, so I'm thinking a .357/.38 special would be best as far as ammo price and availability is concerned. Secondly, as much as I'm attracted to the Winchester 1873, I don't think I'm willing to pay that much for a gun that will only see occasional use. I also want a rifle with a side-loading port as I'm not a fan of the alternative, like the Henry's.

    With those factors in mind, I have been looking at the Mossberg 464 and the Rossi 92. I have heard mixed reviews on these and was wondering if anyone owns one, has shot one, or has any information to pass along. I'm also open to suggestions on other lever-actions or calibers.
    Romans 12:21

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member Array multistage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NW Iowa
    Posts
    2,383
    My days of cowboying are long behind me, and about 1000 miles west of where I'm at.

    But if it's a lever gun, 45-70 for me and that's it.

    Unless I could find a Model 71 that didn't require a refinance of the house.

  4. #3
    VIP Member Array LimaCharlie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    3,127
    My current cowboy carry combo is a Marlin 336-44 Texan and one of my .44 magnum revolvers. I am looking for a Winchester 94 in .45 Colt to go with my Colt SAA in .45 Colt. I also have a Henry Golden Boy in .22 magnum to go with my Ruger Single-Six convertible in .22 LR/.22 magnum.
    I carry a gun, because a Cop is too heavy.

    U.S. Army, Retired
    NRA Patron Life Member.

  5. #4
    VIP Member
    Array PEF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    3,662
    I am a big fan of the Marlin 1894, if you can find one made in 2008 or earlier AND with a JM proof mark. I have had three, and have kept two - one in .44 Mag/.44 SPCL and the other in .357 Mag/.38 SPCL, both in stainless.

    Given that Remington has dropped the ball on the new production, the used ones are going at a premium - In my neck of the woods they are priced at $600-ish for the blued, and $700-ish for stainless.

    Whatever you get, I can verify that a lever action in .357/.38 is a hoot.
    -PEF, a Framer with a Steelie...
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    1. All guns are always loaded.
    2. Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
    3. Keep your finger off the trigger until your sights are on the target.
    4. Be sure of your target and what is beyond it.

  6. #5
    Senior Member Array royal barnes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Wendell, N.C.
    Posts
    567
    I would opt for the '92 Puma. Some of them are finicky on overall cartridge length with reloads. Factory spec ammo should be fine. In truth they are also a little clunky to operate but head and shoulders above the Mossberg. Most people who use them in CAS have them tuned and the action smoothed.

  7. #6
    Ex Member Array ANGLICO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    I'm the guy next door that is polite, but does not tell you crap.
    Posts
    3,570
    Quote Originally Posted by PEF View Post
    I am a big fan of the Marlin 1894, if you can find one made in 2008 or earlier AND with a JM proof mark. I have had three, and have kept two - one in .44 Mag/.44 SPCL and the other in .357 Mag/.38 SPCL, both in stainless.

    Given that Remington has dropped the ball on the new production, the used ones are going at a premium - In my neck of the woods they are priced at $600-ish for the blued, and $700-ish for stainless.

    Whatever you get, I can verify that a lever action in .357/.38 is a hoot.
    Agree, try to find one pre-1964. Check it out.

  8. #7
    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Georgia for now
    Posts
    4,533
    I have, and recommend, a Marlin 1894C, but I also agree that you should look for an older one. Mine is pre-1995 and it's great. The lever was a little stiff, but a couple hundred rounds smoothed it out just fine. Mine happens to be in .45LC, but I see a lot of guys at the Cowboy matches shooting the .357/.38 model. The only problem with the .357/.38 model is that sometimes the timer doesn't count all the rounds. In fact, we had to direct the scenario writers to always finish with shotguns, so the guys shooting the whisper quiet rifles could get times that counted.
    "If you make something idiot proof, someone will make a better idiot."

    - Anon

  9. #8
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    10,060
    The Rossi 92 is a clone of the original Browning-designed Winchester Model 1892. I have a Winchester Model 1892 and have used more than one Rossi 92 .357 Magnum that several different shooting acquaintances own. They give an "authentic" feel about shooting them and represent an acceptable and affordable clone of the original Winchester. That's to say that they are just pretty nice to use. By design, the action is very slick to cycle and operate.

    The Rossi 92 will mimic the old-west cowboy original Winchester "look" best of the choices mentioned. This one's from 1896.
    ANGLICO, sigs and Rock and Glock like this.
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society

    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  10. #9
    Ex Member Array ANGLICO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    I'm the guy next door that is polite, but does not tell you crap.
    Posts
    3,570
    HEY. OP. Love it. Great memories and some awesome gun porn!

  11. #10
    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Music City, USA
    Posts
    3,035
    I checked the prices of a marlin lever action in .357, and compared to the prices of a 30.30 marlin at walmart, they were sky high. Why?

  12. #11
    Member Array BobcatSig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    52
    My first rifle was a Marlin 336CS in .30-30 Win. I love that rifle. I'd be really careful with the Rossi though. I worked in a Sports Authority that sold guns and we had two Rossi 336 knockoffs come in, a blued and a stainless. The blued had an issue with the magazine loading port. It would catch on the bolt 7/10 times that you cycled it. The stainless didn't have the same problem, but it seemed like it would be humanly impossible to properly clean the packing oil. Which I'm fairly certain was extremely used motor oil mixed with rubber cement. I was severely unimpressed.

  13. #12
    Member Array BobcatSig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    52
    Quote Originally Posted by StormRhydr View Post
    I checked the prices of a marlin lever action in .357, and compared to the prices of a 30.30 marlin at walmart, they were sky high. Why?
    From what I understand, when Marlin was bought by Remington the Marlin factories were moved around some and production wasn't matching demand. Econ 101...

  14. #13
    Member Array woodrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by BobcatSig View Post
    My first rifle was a Marlin 336CS in .30-30 Win. I love that rifle.
    I went to the local sporting goods store and they had plenty of Marlin 336's in stock. Pretty good looking gun, and only $460. I was under the impression all Marlin's were twice that or more. It's something I'll consider, however, all the 30-30 ammo in stock was around $0.90 to $1.00 per round...insane!
    Romans 12:21

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

winchester model 1892 .45lc

Click on a term to search for related topics.