1911 Parts

This is a discussion on 1911 Parts within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; So I took a part my 1st true 1911. A few parts are different than the p938, of course, but similar enough to not have ...

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    1911 Parts

    So I took a part my 1st true 1911. A few parts are different than the p938, of course, but similar enough to not have too many issues. This 1911 is a WW1 Colt issued in 1915 I think. I was told by a collector/dealer that it would be okay to clean it up so long as I wasn't trying to refinish, use solvents, scrub with brushes, steel wool etc. until or unless it was properly appraised. So, I just wiped/rubbed it down with gun oil using cotton patches & microfiber. Some rust in the barrel but otherwise looks to be in very good shape with original parts, mag, & holster. My question is about the barrel. What is the "floppy, loop thing" at the end (opposite muzzle) & what's its purpose? Sorry I don't have the proper terminology or better descriptor . Thank you!

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    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
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    The link. It cams the barrel into & out of the locked-breached position. It must be locked to fire & unlocked to chamber a round.
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    Distinguished Member Array deadguy's Avatar
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    Can you give details on where this one came from? Family piece?
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    Floppy loop thing?! Yours moves?


    Yeah, it's the barrel link. When you put it back together the slide stop/release should have gone through the hole in that link.
    And you WILL have to post more pics of that fine piece.
    Also, It certainly won't hurt to run a brass brush through the barrel with whatever it takes to knock that rust out. You don't want to refinish the pistol, but it's OK to stop rust.
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    It came to me via estate. It was issued to my great, great uncle. Dr. J. B. Hill was a chaplain in the Army, so I'm thinking it didn't see as much fire as others on the front line. Thank you, PAcanis, for assuring me I can run a brush through the barrel. I'll pick one up. All mine are for 9mm/.38. The pistol did pass a function test after reassembly, BUT I'm not sure the stop went through the link?? Maybe that's why it's not sitting flush to the frame? Uh-oh. Thank you, ghost tracker, for a helpful, concise answer to my "floppy, loop."

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    TRX
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    Go over to 1911.org and look up the complete disassembly instructions. If nobody has yet marked your gun with the "idiot scratch" from the slide release, pay particular attention to that part.

    Getting the link to line up with the slide release on reassembly can require that you "hold your mouth right" as my wife says.

    A 1915 model in good shape is worth a fair amount to a collector, so you should think out any modifications or changes if you ever intend to sell it, as they will reduce its value. However, there's no reason not to shoot it, as far as I'm concerned. If it was "new in box" it would be one thing, otherwise, use it for what it was made for. I have rifles made in the 1890s, and shooting hasn't hurt them a bit...
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    Ditto that you can feel free to remove any rust out of the barrel bore and chamber even before you have it appraised.

    You can put a light coat of Renaissance Wax on the slide and the frame and that is a better surface protectant than oil and will not (in any way) diminish the value of your firearm.

    You can find it on Ebay. Buy the smallest container as you use so little that it lasts forever.

    Be very careful of those wood grips as they are worth 2 to 3 Hundred Dollars just by themselves.

    Do not do anything at all to those grips and be careful not to kill the grip screws overly tight.

    WHO USES RENAISSANCE WAX
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    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redbirddog5 View Post
    ...Thank you, ghost tracker, for a helpful, concise answer to my "floppy, loop."
    You're more than welcome. But, FYI, I'm best at answering the...SIMPLE questions. Complicated questions make my head hurt.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TRX View Post
    Go over to 1911.org and look up the complete disassembly instructions. If nobody has yet marked your gun with the "idiot scratch" from the slide release, pay particular attention to that part.

    Getting the link to line up with the slide release on reassembly can require that you "hold your mouth right" as my wife says.

    A 1915 model in good shape is worth a fair amount to a collector, so you should think out any modifications or changes if you ever intend to sell it, as they will reduce its value. However, there's no reason not to shoot it, as far as I'm concerned. If it was "new in box" it would be one thing, otherwise, use it for what it was made for. I have rifles made in the 1890s, and shooting hasn't hurt them a bit...
    I learned how to disassemble the p938 via YouTube w/ a warning about the idiot scratch. Have always been careful about that. Unfortunately, this 1911 has one. I guess in war who cares about scratches & what others may value nearly 100rd yrs later, eh?

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    It's like I told my youngest son when he wanted a tattoo. Scars are like tattoos, only with better...stories!
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    I learned something interesting when I went back to look at the slide stop (I'm fairly certain I did not reassemble correctly & the slide stop is not through the link). I am questioning if this Colt was my great, great uncles. I just assumed, because he was in the Army. When I was cleaning the pistol yesterday, I noted some deliberate looking scratches on top of the slide. I looked closer when examining my not-so-great reassemble, and it's clear. "Winiski" has been scratched, "engraved," on the slide. I got the holster out, and on the back, there is some crude engraving: "Corporal J.F. (I think) Winiski." There is also a number. Maybe an Army number? Your not kidding about those stories, Ghost Tracker! Very interesting......
    Off to look at ebay for Renaissance Wax. Thanks y'all!
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    I would think that it would be hard to find a military issue 1911 without the idiot scratch. It could only be issued to so many guys before someone does it. Plus, when it says "property of US government" on the side, well that is a license to abuse it.
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    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
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    There's no real reason why a previously "engraved" gun issued to Corporal Winiski couldn't have subsequently belonged to Dr. J.B. Hill. Heck, even chaplains...play poker!
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    redbird, you need to contact Scott Gahimer at M1911info.com > Home Talk to him about what you have. This man is the end all for info on USGI pistols.

    More importantly, don't screw around with this pistol, whether it has a name etched on top or not.
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    Also, take a look at this list of founding members of this American Legion Post in NJ. You may recognize a name or two....

    Stevenson - D'Alessio American Legion Post 12
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