Releasing the Slide

This is a discussion on Releasing the Slide within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Out of curiosity, I wonder how many people here know how to a one handed malfunction drill? Just use the edge of your shoe and ...

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Thread: Releasing the Slide

  1. #16
    New Member Array foob's Avatar
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    Out of curiosity, I wonder how many people here know how to a one handed malfunction drill?
    Just use the edge of your shoe and push with your rear sight.

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  3. #17
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    "One problem with the part wearing down is that the gun may stop staying open when the magazine is empty."

    Sorry but, that particular problem is NOT caused by using the Slide Stop to release the slide. Nope!


    Some small parts of some 1911 format pistols are of lesser quality than the identical part in another "make" of pistol.
    Concerning the Slide Stop;
    If the slide stop on a carry pistol ever shows any sign of metal deformation then it should be switched out for a higher quality properly hardened part.

    A properly machined and hardened Slide Stop should not deform.
    The part should be properly hardened to a degree that it will not wear or deform.

    The Slide Stop Notch on the slide will usually show a tiny bit of normal deformation in that you may at some point notice a small raised edge.
    That does NOT happen from using the Slide Stop as a Slide Release.
    THAT happens gradually as the slide is stopped by the Slide Stop (during the normal functioning of the handgun) and does not affect the operation or functioning of the pistol.

    As modern slides are now harder and tougher than the older slides it is not so common of an event anymore but, it means nothing regardless.

    There should be NO problems with using the slide stop as a slide release if the shooter wants to use it as a slide release.

    Sling shotting your slide as part of your training regimen (and to develop desired muscle memory) is fine and dandy.

    Do it for the correct reason though.

    Do not do it because you think you are "SAVING" your pistol from any sort of unnatural or undue wear or "STRESS" to either the Slide Stop or the slide by releasing the slide using the stop.
    That is just not so.

    If your Slide Stop is wearing or think it is being "Stressed" then you need to do some shopping at Brownell's for a higher quality hardened and tougher part.

    Some people will always want to baby a pistol & nurture it and Kiss its A$$ because they think it is beautiful and they paid a lot of money for it.
    That is their personality & That is fine with me but, what is NOT fine is that they invent things that "should and should not" be done...for the "good of the pistol" that have no real basis in historical or mechanical fact.
    Then the myth feeds on itself and finally it becomes so common that it's accepted as truth.
    If using your Slide Stop as a slide release damages or deforms parts on your pistol then you either have a sub-standard pistol or a pistol with sub-modern-standard parts.
    Last edited by QKShooter; January 21st, 2007 at 01:55 PM.

  4. #18
    Member Array pistola's Avatar
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    Lightbulb AGREE

    QKShooter, You said it well....Afterall this part is what holds the barrel in place, and what the barrel pivots on.

  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by foob View Post
    Just use the edge of your shoe and push with your rear sight.
    Yep thats one way.


    QK, good description on a 1911. What about other weapons where that is not the case, or the part is so easily replaced.

    I will stand on that a stop is for "stop", not release. Secondly, the slingshot method, IMO, is the more sound method. Anyone can raise their thumb up and pull down to release the slide. Many people think Bruce Willis looked really cool in Last Man Standing doing that. However just because anyone can, does not mean that it is the best method. Learning how to do sling shot (which it has to be learned) will uniformly be a much better method for reload and malfunction clearing.

    And I have seen weapons fail to lock in the open when they are empty because the slide stop is damaged, but I will admit that is probably not the common problem of that happening. Such things as the last round was a light load can cause it, limp wristing your last shot, or a dirty weapon can cause it to happen. Knowing how do to a proper tacticle reload/malfunction drill can be the difference in saving your life.
    I will support gun control when you can guarantee all guns are removed from this planet. That includes military and law enforcement. When you can accomplish that, then I will be the last person to lay down my gun. Then I will carry the weapon that replaces the gun.

  6. #20
    Member Array lightningstrike02's Avatar
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    I paractice a a SLAP RACK AND BANG drill .It clears alot of simple /common type of malfunctions.(induced malfuntions for training, not commonly a problem). When working this drill hard, with full magazines you can find the point of force that slapping in a magazine will release the slide consistently. Not a recommended drill for new shooters, but an option for one handed clearing or reload.Also not recommended for shooters who cant diagnos weapon malfunctions,parts replacement and discussion with others who watch and just think its cool.
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  7. #21
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    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by lightningstrike02 View Post
    I paractice a a SLAP RACK AND BANG drill .It clears alot of simple /common type of malfunctions.(induced malfuntions for training, not commonly a problem). When working this drill hard, with full magazines you can find the point of force that slapping in a magazine will release the slide consistently. Not a recommended drill for new shooters, but an option for one handed clearing or reload.Also not recommended for shooters who cant diagnos weapon malfunctions,parts replacement and discussion with others who watch and just think its cool.
    The method of "SLAMMING" in the mag into the gun in order to get the slide to drop is fine WHEN and IF it works...

    I've seen many shooters try to do it in matches and it has failed them (slide didn't fall when they needed it to).

    I have a saying:

    "If it WORKS in a match it may or not work on the street. But if it FAILS in a match it will FAIL on the street."

    Been there, done it, seen it fail even with me doing it.

    Something to think about...

    As far as whether or not to rack the slide or use the slide lock/lever/release goes, I have seen a BUNCH of guns not lock open on the last shot.

    Bottom Line:
    Racking the slide ALWAYS works, but it's slower than using the slide release. Using the release is ALWAYS faster, but hard to use with gloves. It's also harder to use on stock Glock levers with slippery hands. So, I train BOTH WAYS, just in case.

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  8. #22
    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRM View Post
    Bottom Line: Racking the slide ALWAYS works, but it's slower than using the slide release. Using the release is ALWAYS faster, but hard to use with gloves. It's also harder to use on stock Glock levers with slippery hands. So, I train BOTH WAYS, just in case.
    I really disagree with this. I think it is far better to pick one way, and do it that way all the time. The goal of self defense training should be to reach a state of unconscious competence, where the proper response is as close to automatic as possible. A big part of this is developing muscle memory to the point where performing the purely mechanical actions associated with gunfighting (shooting, reloads, stoppage reduction, etc.) can be done without conscious thought. Going with two different methods of releasing the slide is going to double the number of repetitions required to ingrain this technique in muscle memory.

    More importantly, it's going to force an unnecessary decision on me in a gunfight. No matter how many times I practice the two techniques, every time I need to send the slide forward I will have to decide which one to use. If I'm in a gunfight, I need to be thinking about important things like, "What's the BG doing? Does he have a friend sneaking up behind me? Am I still justified in using lethal force against him?" A few tenths of a second just isn't worth interrupting my train of thought to think about how to release the slide.

    Decisionmaking in a gunfight should be concentrated on the big picture: Who do I need to shoot and where do I need to move to survive? Everything else should be as close to autopilot as possible.

  9. #23
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    I agree with Blackeagle's reply above. I always have used the slide release on 1911's and it is completely natural to me. Also after many thousands of rounds through my carry gun, no wear observed from this practice.

    It's worth mentioning that the practice of letting the slide slam home on an empty chamber whether slingshot or slide release is not a good idea. Watch the old-timers at a bullseye match. They will not only ease the slide forward on an empty chamber but will hold the trigger back at the same time - Protects the sear on a nice trigger job.

    ....Skye....

  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackeagle View Post
    I really disagree with this. I think it is far better to pick one way, and do it that way all the time....
    If you wish to stay with ONLY one way, then you should be racking the slide everytime. Think about this:

    How do you load the gun? You rack it...

    How do you clear a jam? You rack it...

    How do you unload the gun? You rack it...

    On the other side of the coin, AWLAYS using the slide stop is not practical for the above mentioned reasons.

    Respectfully,

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  11. #25
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    And who's calling them slide locks, are you sure all firearm designers designed that part to be only used for locking the slide?
    Can't speak for all designers, but John Browning called his a slide stop, not a slide release.
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  12. #26
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    My only point is that using the Slide Stop to release the slide should never physically cause damage to either the Slide Stop or the slide.

    If it does....then shop for a better quality firearm that does not have Made In Pakistan roll marked on it.
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  13. #27
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    Hate to add more fuel to the fire.. but I was taught a different way than using the slide stop, or slingshotting. I was told not to slingshot (thumb and pointer) I was told to grab the slide with palm on one side, fingers on the other, stay out of the ejection port or it'll hurt, pull back swiftly, and release. I was also told as part of practice to slap my shoulder after I released.

    The reason I was told this is better, is that you have less motion in your hand that is holding the weapon. If you slingshot slowly, and pay attention the weapon has to angle off your target or wherever it is currently pointing to slingshot.

    IE: If you are right handed, begin your slingshot technique with your (unloaded) weapon pointing straight in front of you. You will notice that you almost have to point the weapon to the right even more, to properly grab the slide from the back using the slingshot technique. (lefties go left with it)With palm on one side, and fingers on the other, you can keep your weapon pointed straight, instead of veering off to one side.

    This was taught to me in a Randy Cain handgun 101 class, and it makes sense to me, so I try to remember to do it as much as possible. Before I was taught that, I was also guilty of releasing using the slide stop lever.

    To each his own, just thought I would add something additional.
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  14. #28
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    I have been playing with this lately and the only method that is consistent from one gun to another or with gloved hands is the over the top slide manipulation.

    I think DR pretty much nailed it here. It is a commonality of robust pistol manipulation. Slamming a magazine in hard enough to make the slide go forward is not good practice. I have seen it fail many times. If your slide goes forward when you insert the magazine run it any way just to make sure.

    Running the slide works on a great variety of guns, slide locks are in different positions on a great variety of different guns.

    I will stick to running the slide.
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