Stopping Recoil Anticipation

This is a discussion on Stopping Recoil Anticipation within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Scenario (All too common for myself): I'm at the range with my XD and I notice that every single time I'm ready to fire I ...

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Thread: Stopping Recoil Anticipation

  1. #1
    New Member Array questionallthings's Avatar
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    Stopping Recoil Anticipation

    Scenario (All too common for myself):

    I'm at the range with my XD and I notice that every single time I'm ready to fire I always anticipate the recoil and my shot goes roughly 3-6" above where I wanted it to go.

    *****

    I was wondering if any of you have any advice on how I can train myself to stop anticipating the recoil so I can get a more accurate shot off at the range (or really in any situation).

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    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
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    Ive heard of having somone else load your gun for you. They either put in a round or a snap cap and you don't know. I'd have them put in a lot of snap caps (or just set you up to dry fire) and after a bunch of that Sneak in a live round. Never go lax on safety discipline.

    **edit to add:

    Just realized you are shooting a big gun. If the recoil is affecting your accuracy and ability to follow up quickly, maybe you should consider downsizing. Nothin wrong with big calibers, but putting where they need to be quickly is priority number 1.
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    Snap caps loaded in the mags then inserted W/O looking should work fine.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


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    jmc
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    I have a similar problem. It was suggested to me to practice more often with a revolver, only load 2 or 3 rounds, see my reaction when I hit an empty chamber and start making adjustments.
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    In addition to the above posts, dry fire helps a lot. Get a hold of a 22 and go shooting.
    Every time I develop the flinch, I go shoot a light weight 357 or 44.
    Then when I go shoot a 45, it seems as if its a 22 and the flinch is gone.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  7. #6
    New Member Array questionallthings's Avatar
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    Well I will have no problem getting a hold of smaller caliber semis/revolvers. So I'll give those a shot. Do you know of good snap cap products I should look into (I hate to say it but I really love the feel of my XD)?

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    Member Array bobernet's Avatar
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    Dry practice. A lot. In fact, dry practice more than you live fire.

    Watch a cigarette smoker after they finish a meal, or reach for a cup of coffee, or any number of other situations where there's an automatic reach for a smoke.

    If the majority of the time you pull the trigger it goes bang, you will almost definitely eventually develop a reaction of some type.

    If most of the time you squeeze the trigger it goes "click," it's easy to get your body not to anticipate.

    The snap cap in a magazine is a good diagnosis for the flinch, but loads of dry practice is a much better "cure."

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    JD
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    I agree mainly with Sixto, get a .22 shoot a few hundred rounds.

    I haven't tried the snap caps in the mag while at the range, mainly affraid that the cap will go forward of the firing line and I won't be ale to get it back (those buggers are expensive)

    If you know anyone with a .357, borrow it, have them load it with a mixed batch of .38s and .357s.

    Dry firing at home with the snap caps works wonders for allmost all issues you are trying to correct.

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    I'll add a small caveat to the good suggestions ......... if you can reach the point of achieving a release thru good trigger action and overall control - and say to yourself - ''oh - it went'', almost surprised - I'll all but guarantee you'll see better hits.

    Don't ''make'' the shot happen - ''let'' it happen, while concentrating on sights and good grip. A few better results will soon have your habit broken.
    Chris - P95
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    New Member Array questionallthings's Avatar
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    Thanks for all your suggestions. I'll try some of this out at the range over time and give you guys a heads up on how it 's working.

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    BAC
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    I had that problem when I first started shooting dad's Glock 17; after the third mag (17 rounds each), I stared anticipating recoil, and it drove down accuracy. We don't have snap caps, mind you, so the way we solved this problem is to shoot the hell out of the gun. Keep putting lead downrange and see if weapon familiarity won't clear it up.

    Oddly enough, I never had this problem shooting the .44 mag revolver or .45 ACP in the Glock 36. I did, however, have a horrible problem with recoil management with a Kahr K40.

    Good luck and I hope you solve your dilemma, however you do it.


    -B

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    Senior Member Array glock21guy's Avatar
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    Dry fire as well as concentrating on the front sight has worked for me.
    Aaron

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    New Member Array nhwedge's Avatar
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    maybe you might want to watch one of these, go to this link http://www.downrange.tv/player.htm and go to bump drill. having learned from these guys ill tell you it helps a lot.

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    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    Another vote for drop what ever you're shooting and go back to basics with a .22.
    Train the anticipation/flinch/error out of your muscle memory with a .22 pistol.
    The great thing about a .22 is that if you make the tiniest of error with that then it shows up big time on paper and the training is cheap by the brick as opposed to throwing nickels & dimes at trial and error effort.

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    Senior Member Array stanislaskasava's Avatar
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    One more thing that might help a bit to reduce anticipation: double ear protection. It can't hurt anyway...

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